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IN REMEMBRANCE 



By Rev. Alex C. D. Noe 
On this your anniversary, 
The things we'd like to say, 
Cannot be framed in human words, 
And phrases of a day, 
Nor can the years produce the means, 
To really, truly show, 
Our high esteem and love for you — 
The tribute that we owe, 
No tongue can ever shape the sounds, 
To tell you how we feel, 
But God will know, beloved Friend, 
As through the years we. kneel, 
And thank him for your shepherding, 
Unselfish, brave and true; 
And ask for all that life can give, 
In fair return to you. 

(To our beloved Bishop Thomas Campbell Darst, D. D. 
on the 25th anniversary of his consecration.) 



JANUARY 




1940 




THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Editor 

REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 

Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 

ADDRESS OF MR. GEORGE B. ELLIOTT AT 
ANNIVERSARY SERVICE 



I am to speak to you on Bishop Darst — his 
relation to his Laymen, and I am allotted five 
minutes in which to do it. Of course it cannot 
adequately be done in that time, but I shall try 
to give you at least an outline. 

I have been privileged to know our Bishop both 
officially, as his Chancellor, and personally as his 
friend. During the past twenty-five years I 
have watched him grow in grace, in power and 
in the affection of his people. My five minutes 
would not suffice to tell you what this association 
has meant to me, as one of his laymen. But I 
am speaking for all of us. Therefore, that I 
might do so with authority, I wrote twenty odd 
letters to laymen throughout the Diocese. I asked 
them each to give me his impression of our Bish- 
op, and his relation to his laymen, in five or ten 
words. I received twenty-four replies. I wish I 
might read them all to you, but that may not be 
done in five minutes. There was a common note 
running through all of them — affection, respect, 
and admiration. "HE FITS THE NEW HOUR 
PERFECTLY", says one. "SYMPATHETIC 
AND UNDERSTANDING, THE MOST COM- 
FORTING PERSON I KNOW", says another. 
"HIS IS A SPIRIT THAT IS FELT THROUGH- 
OUT THE CHURCH" and "HE LEAVES ME 
WITH A KEEN DESIRE, AT LEAST, TO GET 
NEARER THE THINGS THAT REALLY 



COUNT", and this from one of our Colored Lay- 
men: I CONSIDER HIM A TRUE BISHOP AND 
SHEPHERD OF SOULS, AND LEADER AND 
COUNSELLOR OF MEN. I HAVE BEEN IM- 
PRESSED WITH HIS SINCERE AND GENU- 
INE INTEREST IN US LAYMEN, AND ES- 
PECIALLY OF MY OWN PEOPLE." But I 
cannot quote further. 

In my own view, and it is substantiated by 
these twenty-four letters, our Bishop more nearly 
exemplifies St. Paul's definition of Charity, than 
any man I know. He has Charity — Love — for 
his fellow man, and has it so truly that it domi- 
nates his personality, and his every act in the 
service of the Master he represents. 

"Though I speak with the tongues of men and 
angels, and have not Charity, I am become as 
sounding brass and tinkling cymbals." 

"CHARITY SUFFERETH LONG AND IS 
KIND." Our Bishop is probably the kindest man 
I know. "CHARITY ENVIETH NOT." He has 
no envy, rather he thinks how he may give of him- 
self to others in need. "CHARITY VAUNTETH 
NOT ITSELF, IS NOT PUFFED UP." There 
is no false pride about the man. He is as humble 
as the least man in his charge. Though, in the 
estimation of a Christian, he holds the highest 
office in the gift of man, he meets us on terms 
of equality, "vaunteth not himself", and could 
not be "puffed up" if he tried. Charity "DOTH 
NOT BEHAVE ITSELF UNSEEMLY, SEEK- 
ETH NOT HER OWN, IS NOT EASILY PRO- 
VOKED, THINKETH NO EVIL"— all descriptive 
of the character of our Bishop as we Laymen know 
him. But continue the comparison for yourself. 
You will agree with us, I know. To me, with my 
knowledge and affection for the man, he fills the 
definition most remarkably. Instead of seeking 
his own, he goes about his Diocese intent on help- 
ing where he can. He thinks not of his own wants, 
nor of his needs, but rather, how he can add to 
the wellbeing, material and spiritual, of his peo- 
ple. He loves us with a solicitous love that 
does not let him think of his high office as a 
matter of personal pride, but rather as a com- 
mission of his Master to "Feed my sheep". And 
we, his laymen, all of us watch him as he goes 
about among us, always with a cheerful word, 
always with a comforting assurance, and love 
him for what he is, and for what, in his Master's 
name, he does. 

That, I think, is a rather sketchy picture of 
what we think of our Bishop, and his relation to 
us. I wish I might say that the other side of the 
picture — the relation of the laymen to their Bish- 
op was half so perfect. But it is not. We take 
(Continued on Page 14) 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C,, JANUARY, 1940 



NUMBER 1 



BISHOP'S ANNUAL ADDRESS 



Brethren of the Clergy and Laity 
of the Diocese of East Carolina. 

"Grace be unto you and peace from God our 
Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ." 

For twenty-five years it has been my blessed 
privilege to extend that greeting to you as we 
have met, in love and fellowship, to take counsel 
together concerning the King's business, and it 
is from a humble and grateful heart that I give 
you that greeting today as we enter upon our 
second quarter century as fellow laborers with 
Him whose loving presence has made of our Dio- 
cese a family of God. 

During all of our years together, it has been 
seldom that the ranks of our Clergy have been 
broken by death, but today it becomes my sad 
duty to report to you that five of our number 
have left our earthly company during the past 
year. May we stand as I read their names. 

Rev. George Seddon Gresham 
Rev. James Elliott Holder 
Rev. Arthur Harley Marshall 
Rev. Robert Brent Drane, D. D. 
Rev. William Osmond Cone 

"Remember Thy servants, Lord, according 
to the favor which Thou bearest unto Thy peo- 
ple, and grant that, increasing in knowledge and 
love of Thee, they may go from strength to 
strength, in the life of perfect service, in Thy 
Heavenly Kingdom ; through Jesus Christ our 
Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the 
Holy Ghost ever, one God, world without end, 
Amen." 

One is tempted at such a time as this to dwell on 
the past, to recount accomplishments, to give 
statistical information, showing growth in num- 
bers and in financial responsibility, but it is not 
my intention to yield to that temptation today. 
We are grateful that as a Diocese we have shown 
J substantial growth and that many of our people 

* have not been unmindful of their responsibility as 
<*0 stewards of God's bounty, and we could well 
^ spend a pleasant hour reviewing the high lights 
■ of the past twenty-five years. 

^» Personally, such an exercise would make me 

*"• very happy, for every advance in our diocesan 
'^| life, every little triumph over difficulties, every 



foot of new ground won for the King, is recorded 
on the tablet of my heart and included in my 
grateful prayers. 

But, the whole purpose of our coming together 
would be defeated; the whole challenging call 
of our time would go unheeded, if I had no more 
stirring message than the story of what we have 
tried to do during the past quarter of a century. 

Our only excuse for looking into the past to- 
day is that we may be enabled to take stock of 
our resources, face with honesty and courage our 
failures, examine our weaknesses, and, by God's 
grace, go forth to build a better diocese and a fair- 
er world. Because this is true ; because you 
and I are not satisfied that we have given our 
best as individuals, and as a diocese, I desire to 
point out some of the ways in which we may 
strengthen the Kingdom of God in East Caro- 
lina, some of the ways in which a reconsecrated 
and rededicated Clergy and people may cooperate 
with God in carrying out His Plans. 

Looking After Our Own 

When I came to East Carolina in 1915,' we had 
five thousand three hundred and ninety Com- 
municants. Since that time, I have Confirmed 
eight thousand, nine hundred people, and yet 
today we have but seven thousand, seven hundred 
and seventy-five Communicants, — a loss of six 
thousand, five hundred Communicants in twenty- 
five years. Where have they gone? More than 
two thousand have died. More than one thou- 
sand have left the Diocese. More than two 
thousand have drifted away from the Church 
for two reasons. 

1. Because they were presented for Confirma- 
tion without adequate preparation as to the 
meaning and purpose and glory of the Church, or, 

2. Because they were not tenderly received, 
lovingly guarded and given a place and part in 
the family life of the Church after Confirmation. 

We must look out for all of God's children, my 
brethren of the Clergy and the Laity, but es- 
pecially those who belong to the "household of 
faith". 

It is easy to drop from our list of Communi- 
cants a member who has not Communed for 
three years. It is fatally easy for a congrega- 
tion to accept the absence of a former worshipper, 
but I believe God will want to know why that 
person turned away from the Altar. God will 
want to know why the family did not seem to 
care when a member was lost in the night. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



I lay this matter upon the hearts and con- 
sciences of our Clegy and people with the earn- 
est hope that in every parish and mission steps 
will be taken to stop this dreadful waste and to 
bring back into the fold of Christ those who by 
their own indifference or our neglect have wan- 
dered away. 

This thought leads naturally to the conviction 
that we must have a more compelling 

Sense of Stewardship 

We have grown to associate stewardship with 
money, but after all that is such a small part of 
this tremendous business and it can never be a 
substitute for stewardship of life. Of course, 
every Christian must realize that he should play 
fair with God in the distribution of his material 
goods. Not how much I should give to the work 
of extending His Kingdom, but how much can 
I keep for myself, is the ideal toward which we 
should strive. God has not entrusted all of us 
with money, but to all of us He has given other 
and more precious gifts and He has given them to 
be used, not for self only, but in order that we 
may be sharers with Him in the redemption of 
His world. 

Some of us budget our money, giving what 
we consider a fair share to God and His Church, 
but I wonder how many of us budget our time, 
giving a fair and honest part to the service and 
worship of the King. Are we playing fair with 
God, or are we content to give Him a few minutes 
of purely selfish worship at the end of a weary 
day? Are we willing that God should give to 
us and ours the scant attention that we give to 
Him? Does He, the giver of all life, the gra- 
cious dispenser of our days and hours, have for 
His own blessed use as much of our time as we de- 
vote to the morning paper or our favorite radio 
program ? I leave this answer to the honesty 
of our hearts, but I know that we can never go 
forward to glorious triumphs as individuals, as 
parishes, as a diocese, until we are ready and 
willing to give God His rightful share of our time, 
until we are willing to be used in unselfish ser- 
vice in the blessed work of setting up His king- 
dom in the hearts of children, in the poor, empty 
lives of sinning, suffering men and women in the 
disordered and confused world of which we are 
members. 

Our greatest need as we face the new day is 
for a 

Renewal of Spiritual Forces 

We will not go out after our lost brothers until 
we go in the conscious presence and compelling 
power of Jesus. We will not become faithful 
stewards of money and time and talents until 
the love of Christ constrains us. We will not give 



ourselves to others until, in joyful surrender, we 
give ourselves to God. 

We must, my beloved people, come back to Him, 
not because of the storm that darkens the world, 
not to save our own little lives from the terrors 
of the storm, but as sons and daughters of the 
Eternal Father, we must go in order to share 
with Him in making a new world. 

It is a great task — a hard, glorious task — the 
only task worthy of men and women who dare to 
say, "Our Father Who art in Heaven, hallowed be 
Thy name, Thy kingdom come on earth." 

It is not a task for spiritual weaklings — pet- 
ulant, peevish little men and women who seethe 
in their resentments, jealousies and criticisms, 
having no conception of the Church and its Mis- 
sion beyond the local group of which they are 
the center; but it is a task for men and women, 
however humble, however rich or poor in this 
world's goods, who are willing to let God have 
His way in their lives. 

Have we the power as individuals and as a 
diocese to share with God in the tremendous 
task that faces His Church today? 

May we answer that question with our dedi- 
cated lives as we draw near with faith to receive 
the precious gift of His matchless love. 

May this day be in deed and in truth a day of 
Dedication. May we as Bishop, Clergy and 
people lay our lives upon the sacrificial Altar of 
our God, pleading with the Holy Spirit to burn 
away our selfishness and our sins, recreating 
in us that divine power that will enable us to 
overcome the world. 

The Altar, however, is not to be our resting 
place, but our starting point ; not the place of with- 
drawal, but the high mount of renewal. From 
the Mount of Transfiguration, Jesus went down to 
meet and heal the suffering and the sin in the 
valley. P>om the upper room of His high and 
holy sacramental meal, Jesus went to the sacra- 
ment of the Cross. 

From the Altar today we will go to the val- 
ley of our ordinary lives — to the problems of our 
parishes and communities — to the cruelty and 
hate and greed of our poor broken war-crazed 
world. 

But we will go as men and women who have 
looked into the face of God and heard His voice. 

We will go, not in bewilderment and fear 
and doubt, but as loyal soldiers and servants of 
the Master of all life — "Strong in the strength 
that God supplies through His eternal Son." 

May God bless and guide us, my brethren, as 
we go out to build the Kingdom of God in the 
lives of men, in our parishes, in the neglected 
corners of our diocese, and in the broken heart * 
of the world. % 



JANUARY 1940 



For twenty-five years we have walked together 
as friends ; through storms and difficulty, through 
pleasant days and dark; we have gone forward 
conscious that One walked with us through 
light and shadow. 

Dear Christ, grant that we may march on 
together with Thee till victory crowns our stri- 
vings and peace comes to our hearts and to our 
world. 



REPORT OF WOMAN'S AUXILIARY TO THE 
DIOCESAN CONVENTION 



Rt. Rev. Father in God, 

Members of the Diocesan Convention, and, 

Members of the Woman's Auxiliary. 

At such a time as this when we are called upon 
to celebrate the twenty-fifth Anniversary of the 
Consecration of our beloved Bishop, I feel, knowing 
and loving him as we do, that he will realize the 
cherished place which he possesses in our hearts. 
As he leads us in the Forward March of the 
Church today may we rededicate the Woman's 
Auxiliary of this Diocese as a body of loyal wo- 
men ever ready to follow wheresoever he may 
lead us. 

In presenting a resume of the work of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary over the last eight months we can 
not refrain from a feeling of joy in what has been 
accomplished. Undoubtedly, there has been a 
growth of spiritual consciousness evidenced. Our 
women are catching the vision! They are ap- 
proaching the point where they are glad of the 
privilege to answer the call of Christ Crucified. 
"I, if I be lifted up, will bring all men unto me." 

Within our diocese during the last few months 
we have been honored by an extended visit of one 
of those beautiful characters, Miss Sallie Dean of 
Richmond, Va. She most unselfishly has con- 
ducted Institutes of one week each in seven of 
our cities. Her stay with us has been a bene- 
diction and the leaven which she has so tenderly 
implanted is gradually spreading throughout 
the diocese. Already I have seen three incidences 
where groups of at least fifty women each, have 
right about faced and I firmly believe that these 
are only a beginning of a great awakening. 

Last year, I as! ed that our parishes make an ef- 
fort to utilize the knowledge and interest of their 
women in forming a unified parish educational 
program. I am indeed happy to report that this 
has been done by one of our parishes to my certain 
knowledge, and has been proven not only prac- 
tical but most beneficial. Let us urge that more 
of our parishes try this method. 

The most valuable contribution which the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary can make to the Church in this 



distressed world of ours is to make of us loyal 
members of the unified Church, the Body of 
Christ, through constant study of the word of 
Christ directing our thoughts. The Christian 
Spirit must enter into us, all of us, in all of our ac- 
tivities, business and social. Truly this is a task; 
but I feel that our educational department is doing 
a beautiful piece of work in bringing this about. 
Let us strive to create a consciousness of world 
wide fellowship. 

During the past year the Christian Social Re- 
lations Department has visited the sick and shut- 
ins, county homes and jails, ministering to human 
needs. This department co-operates both with 
local social agencies and other denominational 
organizations. Through this work the women 
have strengthened their own spiritual lives. 

The Field Department reports a growing in- 
terest in the work of this department through- 
out the diocese. There is much indication that 
the work is going forward as thirty-five parishes 
have field chairmen. In co-operation with the 
leadership of the National Council, Every Member 
Canvass material was mailed each of the seventy- 
one Auxiliaries. The November issue of the Spirit 
of Missions was included in this material. A Dio- 
cesan Scholarship Contest is now underway. The 
subject of the essay is, "Evangelism First, Why?" 
and we hope it will create great interest in this 
subject. 

Through the Department of Publicity many 
Church news items have been sent to local and 
state papers and to the Mission Herald. In Feb- 
ruary a copy of the resolution adopted by the 
National Executive Board regarding the Jews 
in Germany was sent to all daily and weekly pa- 
pers in the diocese and a copy to each rector with 
a request that he read the resolution at a Sun- 
day Morning Service. A campaign was conducted 
in the Fall to obtain subscriptions to the Spirit 
of Missions with splendid results in a number of 
parishes. 

One of the cooperating agencies of the Woman's 
Auxiliary is the Church Periodical Club. Leaf- 
lets, bibles, prayer books, hymnals, games, sec- 
ular books, and scrap books have been distributed. 
One-hundred-ninety birthday cards were sent to 
our East Carolina Missionaries. Fifty-six Auxil- 
iary members send seventy-five magazines reg- 
ularly each month to isolated people. Through 
this department the following institutions have 
been aided: C. C. Camps, County Homes, Delgado 
Mission, Galilee Mission, St. Philip's Church, Sal- 
vation Army, Red Cross Sanitorium, Stockade, 
Good Shepherd Hospital, Katherine Kennedy 
Home, Community Hospital and Colored Churches 

The Supply work is a very important part of the 
•Woman's Auxiliary. The women of East Carolina 



THE MISSION HERALD 



through this department have sent clothing 
amounting to $361 through its regular allotments 
from head quarters and through boxes of clothing 
which were voluntarily sent has contributed $495. 
Boxes were sent to the Thompson Orphanage a- 
mounting to $1187.61. In all the women of this 
diocese through this department have contribu- 
ted $2,048.75. 

This past year marked the fiftieth Anniversary 
of the United Thank Offering of the Women of the 
Church. In this diocese the offering in 1939 
has increased 5 1 /-) per cent over 1938. The in- 
terest manifested and the fact that many more 
women are sharing in this gift from thankful 
hearts makes us believe that our women are real- 
izing the significance of this Holy Offering of 
prayers and gifts and joyful service. 

And so in re-capitulation we find that the 
financial contributions of the women of this dio- 
cese in the five fields of service are: 

Parish $ 4,845.11 

Community 1,890.55 

Diocese 4,783.91 

Nation 684.41 

World 999.72 

Supply 482.37 

United Thank Offering 3,475.89 

Total $17,162.16 

We, the women of the Diocese, ask of the rec- 
tors and laymen, that an effort be made whereby 
the Woman's Auxiliary not be called upon to do 
the work which is the privilege of the congre- 
gation to perform. That in those parishes where 
this practice exists that such responsibilities be 
lifted from the Woman's Auxiliary and placed up- 
on the proper group. The women of the Church 
have a two-fold obligation — that which they owe 
as members of the parish and that which they 
owe as members of an organized group within 
the parish. Let us not endanger the efficiency 
of the latter by the possibility of an effort to 
merge these separate obligations. Carpets for 
the floor of the Church, sexton's salary, coal and 
laundry bills and such expenses are expense of 
the parish and should be paid by the parish and 
not by the Woman's Auxiliary. By this I mean 
that the routine expenses of the parish should 
be paid by the pledges of the parish members. 
Perhaps in instances where the funds will not meet 
the expenses it might be wise to concentrate 
your efforts on a more thorough Every Member 
Canvass. All of these expenses are necessary and 
must be met but let us not be quite so willing to 
shift them onto the over willing shoulders of our 
women. Leave them free to do those things for 
which the womanhood of our Church has been 



commissioned to do in the five fields of service. 
This desire comes not only as a request from the 
Woman's Auxiliary but is the earnest plea of 
our Bishop who has assured us that he stands 
firm behind us on this matter. 

May the ever present Father of us all continue 
to find us always ready to do his bidding in the 
Forward March of the Church. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GETHYN R. POISSON, President 
(Mrs. L. J. Poisson) 



IN MEMORIAM 



Just before dawn and the early call of the 
birds she loved so well, her sufferings ended, the 
soul of Natella Gidley Leens slipped quietly up 
to her Lord : Into the Life Triumphant. 

In the passing of Mrs. Leens on December 28th 
1939, the Woman's Auxiliary of St. Peter's Chursh 
resolves : 

That a most faithful member has been called to 
her reward ; whose hands were ever stretched out 
to relieve suffering and sorrow : whose heart was 
ever filled with tender sympathy for those in 
distress. 

That her loyalty to her Church, her beautiful 
faith and unswerving adherence to every duty is 
an inspiration to us in the Master's work. 

That a copy of these resolutions be inscribed 
on a page of its minutes, and a copy be sent to 
her faithful companion and friend, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Windley. 

MRS. T. HARVEY MYERS 
MRS. E. P. MARTIN 
MRS. JOHN H. BONNER 



RESOLUTIONS 



WHEREAS, God in His infinite wisdom has seen 
fit to remove from our midst our beloved Presi- 
dent, Natella Gidley Leens ; and 

WHEREAS, Mrs. Leens was one of our highly 
esteemed and most loved members of the Altar 
Guild. 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That this 
society has lost a beloved leader whose loving 
kindness and sympathy will ever be cherished and 
remembered. 

RESOLVED FURTHER, That this Resolution 
be spread upon the minutes of the Altar Guild; 
that it be sent to The Mission Herald, published in 
t v e Daily News and that a copy be sent to the 
family of the deceased. 

MRS. SAM FOWLE 
MISS MA RY FOWLE 
MRS. MARINE RE3PASS 

Committee 



JANUARY 1940 



THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLDSBORO 



By Mrs. W. A. Darden, Publicity Chairman 



February Calendar 

Purification of St. Mary, the Virgin 2 

Ash Wednesday 7 

World Day of Prayer 9 

St. Matthias 24 

Lent is the time to "re-charge our batteries at 
the source of all power". Study the Presiding 
Bishop's chosen book for Lent. 

Cooperate with the other Communions in the 
observance of the World Day of Prayer which 
comes on the ninth day of February. 

Ask your delegates to the Annual Meeting for 
a report at the first meeting in February. 

Get the members of your Auxiliary interested 
in the Field Department Contest. The winner 
gets a scholarship to the Adult Conference at 
Kanuga. 



CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN 



On Sunday morning, January 7th at Christ 
Church, the Rev. Charles E. Williams held an In- 
stallation Service at which time the Woman's 
Auxiliary officers for the year were installed. 
During the singing of a hymn, the officers car*ie 
up to the Altar rail, and there Rev. Mr. Williams, 
in his instructions, admonished each one to be 
loyal — loyal to one's church, to one's work, and 
to one's self. 

He spoke of the power of prayer, and what it 
had meant in his life, and stressed the joy and 
peace to be gained through prayer. 

The following officers were installed, as Execu- 
tive Board of Woman's Auxiliary of Christ 
Church, New Bern: President of Auxiliary, Mrs. 
John A. Guion; First Vice-President; Mrs. John 
H. Jones ; Second Vice-President, Mrs. Roy 
Shupp; Secretary, Miss Sadie Whitehurst; Treas- 
urer, Mrs. Julia Jacobs; United Thank Offering 
Chairman, Mrs. George Roberts; Chairman Sup- 
ply Department, Mrs. Frank Perry; Chairman 
Christian Social Service, Mrs. Bertha Duffy; 
Chairman Educational Department, Mrs. R. A. 
Nunn; Chairman Field Department, Mrs. Numa 
Nunn ; Chairman Publicity Department, Mrs. 0- 
wen G. Dunn; Secretary Church Periodical, Mrs. 
George Moulton. 



St. Stephen's Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary 
met Monday afternoon, January 15th, in the Par- 
ish House. The following officers and depart- 
mental chairmen were installed by a brief, but 
impressive service by the minister, Rev. John 
Grainger : Chairman, Mrs. Hazel Zealy; Vice- 
Chairman, Mrs. R. B. Miller; Secretary, Mrs. 
James Belote ; Treasurer, Miss Evelyn Pace ; Edu- 
cational Committee, Mrs. Edwin Borden III; De- 
votional Committee, Mrs. William Royall; Chris- 
tian Social Relations, Miss Hattie Dillon; Supply 
Committee, Mrs. Mullin; United Thank Offering, 
Miss Lelia Cobb ; Periodical Club, Mrs. Henry 
Carraway; Hospitality Co-chairmen, Mrs. Henry 
Stenhouse and Mrs. Kennon Borden. 

The only business taken up in this first meeting 
of the year was the election of delegates to the 
Annual Diocesan Meeting in Wilmington, January 
23-25. The following were elected: Miss Hattie 
Dillon, Mrs. Andrew Faulkner, Mrs. A. J. Max- 
well, Jr. Mrs. Zealy appointed three alternates. 

Mrs. Edwin Borden introduced Mrs. Louis J. 
Poisson of Wilmington, the Diocesan President, 
who made an inspiring talk on the Work of the 
Women in the Church and Auxiliary Program 
Planning. Mrs. Poisson was accompanied to 
Goldsboro by Mrs. W. 0. S. Sutherland, Convo- 
cational President; Mrs. Donald MacRae, Chair- 
man of the Educational Division; and Mrs. Chas. 
F. Green, Chairman of the Field Department. 

After the meeting adjourned the members went 
to the home of Mrs. H. M. Stenhouse for tea. Mrs. 
Stenhouse welcomed the guests. Mrs. Hugh Hum- 
phrey and Mrs. C. W. Grainger poured at oppo- 
site ends of an attractively appointed table. 



HOLY INNOCENTS', SEVEN SPRINGS 



On Sunday afternoon December 19th our auxil- 
iary visited the State Farm Colony for Women. 
The women joined in the devotional program. Af- 
ter the benediction, refreshments furnished by 
our auxiliary were served, and it made our hearts 
glad to extend our service in this way. 

MRS. HELEN CROOM, Publicity Chairman 



PALMETTO PALMS FOR SALE 
$5.00 per hundred 

by Woman's Auxiliary 

Address: Mrs. M. B. Thompson, 

Aurora, N. C. 



THE MISSION HER \LD 




Bishop and some of those who look part in the Anniversary Service 
THE ANNUAL CONVENTION AS REPORTED BY THE WILMINGTON PAPERS 



Organization of the Convention 

The Diocesan Convention was organized yes- 
terday morning at ten o'clock with the election 
of the Rev. Walter R. Noe, of Wilmington, as 
Secretary and Mr. George B. Elliott of Wilming- 
ton as Chancellor of the Diocese. 

The First Service of the Convention 
Bishop Darst Speaks 

At 10:30 A. M. a service was held in the Church 
at which Bishop Darst made his Annual Address 
and the Annual Address of the President of the 
Woman's Auxiliary was made by Mrs. Louis J. 
Poisson. 

"Our greatest need on facing the new day is a 
renewal of our spiritual forces . . . We must give 
ourselves to God," Bishop Darst said in his ad- 
dress. 

"It is a glorious work, that of bringing the 
world to Christ. It is a task for both rich and 
poor — for anyone who is willing to let God have 
His way in their lives." 

Bishop Darst expressed appreciation to all 
members of the Diocese for their aid and cooper- 
ation during his twenty-five years of service. 

"I have found joy in your friendship," he said. 

Mrs. Poisson, president, making the annual 
Woman's Auxiliary Report at the joint meeting, 
said: "At this time, on the observance of Bishop 
Darst's twenty-fifth anniversary, a good oppor- 
tunity is presented to dedicate our lives to the 
forward march of the Church. 

All members of the Church who have served as 
president of the Woman's Auxiliary since Bishop 



Darst was consecrated were present this morning. 
They were: Mrs. Fannie Staton, Mrs. Henry Mac- 
Millan, Mrs. Fred Outland and Mrs. Louis J. 
Poisson. 

Shortly after Bishop Darst's address, the joint 
session held a Corporate Communion Service, 
and envelopes for the Bishop's Fund were placed 
in the alms basin. 

The delegates were served a luncheon at one 
o'clock at the First Presbyterian Church. 

Several hundred delegates from throughout 
this section of the state are present for the meet- 
ings. 

Afternoon Session 

The afternoon session of the Convention was 
spent in a study of the financial program for 1940. 
As a result of one of the most successful Every 
Member Canvasses in a number of years reported 
by Rev. John R. Tolar, Chairman of the Finance 
Department, the Diocese adopted a budget for 
the year of $41,000.00 

The Rev. Mortimer Glover, rector of St. James' 
Church, the Rev. Alexander Miller, rector of St. 
Paul's Church, the Rev. John C. Grainger, rec- 
tor of St. Stephen's Church, Goldsboro, and the 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Executive Secretary of the Dio- 
cese were elected clerical deputies to the General 
Convention of the Church to be held in the fall 
at Kansas City. 

Alternates elected were the Rev. Stephen Gard- 
ner, rector of St. Peter's Church, Washington, the 
Rev. E. F. Moseley, rector of St. Mary's Church, 
Kinston, the Rev. W. Tate Young, rector of St. 
John's Church, Fayetteville, and the Rev. George 



JANUARY 1940 



9 



F. Hill, rector of Christ Church, Elizabeth City. 

Though three ballots were taken, only one lay 
delegate, Mr. George B. Elliott, was elected. The 
ballotting will continue this morning. 

The Convention was invited to meet next year 
in Christ Church, Elizabeth City, and accepted 
the invitation. 

At the afternoon session of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary the delegates heard the Rev. Gilbert P. 
Symons, Litt. D., speak on the Forward Move- 
ment now being carried on in the Church. 

Anniversary Service 

Members of the Episcopal Church in the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina gathered in St. James' 
Church here last night to pay tribute to the Rt. 
Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Bishop of the Dio- 
cese, celebrating the Twenty-fifth Anniversary 
of his consecration. 

The celebration came at the close of the first 
day of business of the Fifty-seventh Annual Dio- 
cesan Convention and of the Annual Meeting of 
the Woman's Auxiliary. 

After the opening of the service last night 
the Rev. Stephen Gardner, rector of St. Peter's 
Church, Washington, N. C, who was in charge 
of the celebration, read letters and telegrams 
from the Rt. Rev. Henry St. George Tucker, 
Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, the 
Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, Bishop of the Diocese 
of North Carolina, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, 
Bishop of the Diocese of Western North Carolina, 
the Rt. Rev. William A. Brown, Bishop of South- 
ern Virginia, the Rt. Rev. William T. Capers, 
Bishop of West Texas, the Rt. Rev. John D. Wing, 
Bishop of Southern Florida, the Diocese of Upper 
South Carolina, the Bishop of Atlanta, and the 
Rt. Rev. William Green, Bishop of Mississippi. 

Mr. George B. Elliott, Chancellor of the Diocese 
then spoke on the Bishop's relations with the 
laymen of the Church. He told of the admira- 
tion, respect and affection with which the laymen 
regard the Bishop. He spoke of him as a "sym- 
pathetic and understanding man," as "a spiritual 
force felt throughout the Church," and as "a 
true Bishop and shepherd of souls ... a leader 
and counsellor of men." 

He compared him to Charity as defined by St. 
Paul, saying he is a man who "is long suffering, 
kind, who envieth not, is not puffed up, who vaun- 
teth not himself, who doth not behave himself 
unseemly . . ." 

Mr. Elliott closed with a plea for the laity of 
the Church to give the Bishop greater support 
in the future than in the past. 

Mrs. James G. Staton spoke for the women 
of the Church, telling of their admiration for the 
Bishop, and "pledging the women of the Church 



to help carry on the work of 1940 to wipe out 
the Diocesan Debt". 

The Rev. R. I. Johnson, colored rector of New 
New Bern, told of the Bishop's relations with the 
Colored Convocation of the Church and termed 
him "a man who challenges you to be more than 
you are ; to do more than you have." 

Miss Belle Ray Tillinghast of Fayetteville spoke 
of the Bishop's relations with young people. She 
dwelt at length on the work he did to secure 
Camp Leach, near Washington, N. C, for the 
young people of the Church, and of how he has 
earned their love, gratitude and appreciation." 

A Human Person 

She spoke of him as a "human person who has 
taught us to play and who has played with us." 
She related how when at Camp Leach, the Big 
Apple made its appeal for the favor of dancers the 
older heads retired to the sidelines. But the Bish- 
op, she said, "who changes his robes for knickers 
and tennis shoes, just trucked on down." She 
told of how the young people of the Church re- 
gard him as "Dear Old Tom," not out of disrespect 
she said, but because they appreciate his "fellow- 
ship, friendship, understanding and love." 

"He is a human being with a heart of gold," she 
said. 

Hampton Noe, representing the young people 
of the church, then presented the Bishop with a 
gift made up of personal contributions from the 
young people of the Church. "We felt he needed a 
vacation this summer," he said. 

The Bishop, too touched to speak, called on Mr. 
Gardner to carry on. 

The Rt. Rev. Albert S. Thomas, D. D., Bishop 
of South Carolina, spoke on the part Bishop Darst 
has played in the work of the National Church. 

The principal address, or sermon, was delivered 
by the Rev. William H. Milton, D. D., rector emer- 
itus of St. James' Church, who now makes his 
home in Baltimore. 

Taking as his text, "If I be lifted up, I will draw 
all men unto me," and "I am among you as one 
that serveth," he pointed to three great needs in 
the Church today: (1) A new standard and pro- 
gram of evangelism ; (2) A new standard of giv- 
ing; (3) A new standard of living. 

Second Day of the Convention 

The election of delegates to the General Con- 
vention and the appointment of committees fea- 
tured the closing sessions yesterday of the Fif- 
ty-seventh Annual Convention of the Diocese of 
East Carolina and the Fifty-second Annual Meet- 
ing of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Episcopal 
Diocese. 

(Continued on Page 14) 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



IJounq People's Service League 



By Mary D. Home, Publicity Chairman 



A LETTER FOR YA' 



Dear Leaguers, 

This issue we want to join in with the rest of 
the Diocese in celebrating our Bishop's Twenty- 
fifth Anniversary as one of us. Some of us are 
going to Wilmington in January to give our con- 
gratulations in person, but there are others who 
won't be able to go. And for those of us who 
must stay at home we may only give our best 
wishes in our hearts. But there's one thing 
everybody can do, so let's 

Drink a toast to Dear Ole Tom, 
Shout till the rafters ring 
Drink a toast to Dear Ole Tom 
Let every loyal Leaguer sing. 

So with a prayer in our hearts of Thanksgiving 
to God for letting us have Thomas C. Darst as our 
Bishop, let's say goodbye 'til another moon rolls 
by— 

So 'til then, 

Mary 



A MAN WTH A KEY 



Every year young people look forward to sum- 
mer — because summer time means vacation. But 
to some of us it means more than just vacation — 
it means Camp Leach. Perhaps you laugh and 
say, "What's so wonderful about Camp Leach? — 
there are other Camps just as good you know." 
And our answer to you is this — 

"It's not just an ordinary camp — this place 
called Camp Leach — it's a little paradise for 
children on the banks of the Pamlico. A place 
where young people go because we find comfort 
and understanding for our youthful problems 
and where we find a kind of happiness that comes 
only with fellowship with others our own age. 
But we go for another reason. We go to see a 
man — a man with a key. 

This man with his key opens up to us, and to all 
who will listen to him a world of peace and happi- 
ness and understanding — a world with a living 
God. And the key turns two ways too — besides 
opening up a new world to us, it opens our hearts 
to God." And you might argue and say, "But 
there are lots of other men with the same key. 
Why this particular man?" 

Yes, perhaps there are other men with the 



same key, but it's so hard to turn their keys, for 
theirs fit a modern grown-up world, and we are 
children. 

But at Camp Leach, our friend through his 
sympathy and understanding changes his key to 
fit us. He talks to us in our language and as 
one of us. He, too, like the others, belongs to a 
grown-up world, but for a few days out of every 
year he belongs to us alone — we do not have to 
share him with a strange and troubled world. 
He is one of us — and he opens God's world to 
us and our world to God. 

And you ask, "Who is this wonderful man?" 
How strange that you do not know, he is our 
Bishop, our beloved "Dear Ole Tom". 



ST. PETER'S, WASHINGTON 



In our first meeting in October we had an In- 
stallation Service in the Church. It was a very 
impressive service and Mr. Gardner, our rector, 
installed the following officers: Robert Russ, 
President; George Herbert Cox, Vice-President; 
Marcia Rodman, Secretary ; Mary Elizabeth Rob- 
bins, Treasurer; Helen Flynn, Publicity Chair- 
man; Neita Koonce, Thank Offering Secretary. 

We had a good attendance at the meeting of the 
Convocation of Edenton in October and some of 
our members attended the meeting of the Convo- 
cation of Wilmington on the following Sunday. 

We have had several good meetings and are 
now running a contest using our own point sys- 
tem for scoring. One of our best meetings was 
a few Sundays ago when we had an exceptionally 
fine program and served hot dogs, drinks, and 
marshmallows prepard by the leaguers and our 
counsellor, Mrs. Harold Wesley. 

For Christmas we took a family of several 
children and fixed up Santa Claus for them and 
fixed some food for the whole family. We also 
took an active part in the Christmas pageant, 
sponsored by the Church School. 

Hoping each and every league will have a pros- 
perous year. 

HELEN B. KIZER, Publicity Chairman 



GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMINGTON 



On December 5, 1939, the Good Shepherd Senior 
League had as their guests, the presidents from 
the different leagues of other churches. These 



JANUARY 1940 



11 



young people told us how each of the leagues 
are run and their activities. We all enjoyed this 
program very much and learned a lot of ways to 
strengthen our own league. 

Then on December 12, the league spent an 
enjoyable evening at the home of an invalid wo- 
man, Miss Annie Walker. We opened the program 
with prayer and beautiful Christmas hymns. Af- 
ter that we had a poem and short skits read by 
Thelma Mintz, Betty Hewlette, and Mary Thomp- 
son. We carried "Miss Annie" fruit and candy. 

On December 26, we were very much surprised 
to find a party arranged for the league when we 
came. Such a time as we had! Christmas carols 
were sung and thrilling games were played. We 
had lots of food and drinks and were presented 
with several trinkets after the party. 
Respectfully submitted, 
THELMA MINTZ, 

Diocesan Representative. 



ST. JOHN'S, FAYETTEVILLE 



In addition to our regular Sunday night meet- 
ings we have done the following things: After 
the regular service on Thanksgiving morning, we 
delivered Thanksgiving boxes to twelve families. 
On the first Sunday in Advent, our league had 
its Corporate Communion with a splendid percent- 
age of attendance. The same Sunday we had a 
fellowship supper. Members of the league gave 
a Christmas pageant "The Perfect Gift", for the 
Church School at the annual White Christmas 
celebration. This pageant was given for a nearby 
mission also. Several met and packed Christmas 
boxes containing Christmas dinners and toys for 
twelve families. A group met and made three 
hundred candle holders for the candle light ser- 
vice. The league held a carol service at the Con- 
federate Woman's Home on Christmas Eve. The 
league made plans for the annual candle light 
service. Members of the league formed the choir. 
A group from the league gathered greens and 
helped decorate the church for the Christmas 
Services. After the candle light service members 
of the league and associate members caroled at 
the hospitals, jails, and homes of shut-ins. Then 
we were graciously entertained at the beautifully 
decorated home of Louise and William Jordan. 

ANN GRAHAM TILLINGHAST, 

Diocesan Representative 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLDSBORO 



Saint Stephen's Y. P. S. L. has completed half of 
one of the most successful years in its history. 
Outstanding among its achievements is the work 
done toward a town organization of the young 



people's groups. Several denominations were pre- 
sent at a general meeting held at St. Stephen's 
Church. At this meeting it was decided to ap- 
point from each league two members who will 
serve on the town council. This Council will do 
most of the work of the organization, however 
mass meetings will be held periodically at which 
the young people will enjoy a closer fellowship 
with leagues of other denominations. We are 
optimistically confident that this organization 
will be a successful and worthwhile enterprise, 
and will be a service to the community. 

Among other things the league has presented 
a pageant at the Christmas Eve Church School 
Service, has organized an acolyte guild, and has 
procured Christmas decorations for the Church. 

GEORGE STENHOUSE, 

St. Stephen's, Goldsboro. 



SAINT PAUL'S, WILMINGTON 



When the Christmas season rolls around with 
its bright lights, Christmas shopping, carols, and 
holly, the League of St. Paul's begins to plan for 
their annual Fellowship Breakfast. And it's a 
happy time with all the league members, regular, 
and irregular ; all the counsellors ; and all the 
college students, all talking, singing, laughing, 
and eating together. This year, we deeply regret 
to say, our beloved friend and rector, Mr. Miller 
was not with us, and we missed him more than 
words can tell. But we know that he was with 
us in his heart and the spirit of fellowship that 
predominated the service and breakfast, was 
something he had taught us to feel. 

The Communion Service began at 7:30 A. M. 
with the Rev. L. J. Malone officiating. It was a 
simple and beautiful service and one which has 
strengthened the bond of fellowship around us. 
After the service came the breakfast and with 
Mr. Malone saying "He was too full to speak", 
Mr. Noe singing "My wild Irish Alex", and Mrs. 
Miller singing a well known Camp Leach ditty, 
the breakfast was a huge success. The highlight 
of the whole affair was, I think, when the entire 
Noe family, (there were six of them) sang a sex- 
tette of "Sweet Adeline". The cooks, who were 
rr embers of the Ladies' Auxiliary, proved not 
only to be adept at cooking breakfast, but also 
at singing, for they gave us THEIR interpreta- 
tion of "Hail, hail, the Gang's all here" which 
was, believe me, something rare. We closed with 
the Friendship Circle, singing "Follow the Gleam" 
and Mr. Malore said the benediction. 
FLORENCE DAVIS, 

St. Paul's, Wilmington 
P. S. From our League to your League: Happy 
New Year, Everybody ! ! ! 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S 

AUXILIARY AS REPORTED BY THE 

WILMINGTON PAPERS 



day of business of the Fifty-seventh Annual Con- 
vention and of the Annual Meeting of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary. 



HELPS FOR EDUCATIONAL CHAIRMEN 



Electing several new officers for the coming 
year and hearing discussions of various phases 
of Woman's Auxiliary Work, the members of the 
Auxiliary of the East Carolina Episcopal Diocese 
closed their Fifty-second Annual Meeting today 
at St. James' Episcopal Church. An unusually 
large number of delegates were present through- 
out the two-day program. 

The New Officers 

New officers elected were : Mrs. W. 0. S. Suth- 
erland, President of the Convocation of Wilming- 
ton; Mrs. Harry Walker, President of the Convo- 
cation of Edenton ; and Mrs. Sam Fowle, Chairman 
of the Christian Relations Committee. 

Today's session was opened at 7:30 o'clock this 
morning with a United Thank Offering Corporate 
Communion, at which Bishop Thomas C. Darst 
officiated. 

Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan of the National Exec- 
utive Board, discussed the workings of the Board 
in relation to the parishes and told the congrega- 
tion of the manner in which the Board deals with 
the problems of the parishes. 

Miss Alice Hartley, Provincial President of the 
Young People's Service Leaggue, made a talk 
urging closer coordination between age and youth. 
These factors, she said, should produce the per- 
fect combination and together we should join 
the forward march of the Church. 

The young people's organizations are in need 
of leadership, she said, and are in need of the 
guidance, leadership and companionship of their 
elders. 

The Rev. Robert Fletcher, now engaged in 
Provincial work among the blind and deaf, spoke 
to the gathering regarding his work among the 
unfortunate. "In keeping with the theme of this 
meeting," he said, "I would like to go forward 
with my work." 

Although blind and deaf, he said those with 
whom he is working are happy in the love of 
Jesus. 

Deaconess Edith Booth discussed at length 
her work among the miners of West Virginia. 

The meeting was closed after discussion of 
the work of Thompson Orphanage by the Rev. 
W. H. Wheeler. 

At last night's session the delegates gathered 
at the Church to pay tribute to Bishop Darst on 
the occasion of his twenty-fifth anniversary as 
Bishop of the Diocese. 

The celebration came at the close of the first 



Continue to closely study the Diocesan Pro- 
gram. Use the Auxiliary Packet. Use "Half 
Hour Papers", 30c; "We Can Pray", 15c; "For- 
ward Day by Day", 3c; "Our Father", 2c; For- 
ward Movement Commission, 406 Sycamore St. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. Use one of the free "Today" 
leaflets every month as indicated in Program as 
"Japan Today" in January. Order a full set from 
281 Fourth Avenue, New York. 

If question arises, search your program for the 
answer. Study the needs of your group and write 
to Mrs. Donald MacRae telling what would inter- 
est them, how many women in the group, how 
often you meet, whether you prefer a full or a 
less elaborate form of the Mission Study. 

Recommended for Lent: "Following Christ", 
recommended by the Bishop of London, $1.00. All 
of the Half Hour Papers. Bible Study, using 
"Our Bible" in Christian Nurture Course. "Christ 
and the World Community". "We Can Pray", 
(Forward Movement). 

Private Devotional Reading: "My Utmost for 
His Highest", by Oswald Chambers. "Imitation 
of Christ", by Thomas A. Kempis. Psychology of 
Christian Personality. "The Practice of the Pres- 
ence of God", by Brother Lawrence. 

If you need a book, you can get it for 2 weeks 
for 10 cents and no postage. A penny a day after 
2 weeks. Write the Lending Library, 281 Fourth 
Avenue, New York. 

Ways of using the Mission Study: The pre- 
ferred Way of a six session Course using the text 
book, Leaders Manual and other recommended 
books. Using Suggestions for Programs, Meetings 
by Anna Canada Swain. Using Course for Young 
People, by Sue Weddell (suitable also for adults). 
All the groups read the text book "Through Tra- 
gedy to Triumph", and then have Rector give a 
book review on it. Combine the six sessions into 
three lectures as suggestd on page five of Leaders 
Manual "Madras and You". 

Keep a little year book to jot down all you do, 
in order to give a full annua! report. 

Last, to hold in mind, but above all, constantly 
use the fellowship prayer, "Grant that we may 
both perceive and know what things we ought to 
know and have grace and power faithfully to per- 
form the same" 

MRS. DONALD MACRAE 

Diocesan Educational Secretary, 
75 South Third Street 

Wilmington, N. C. 



JANUARY 1940 



13 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY KANUGA SCHOLAR- 
SHIP CONTEST ANNOUNCEMENT 
DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



COMPETITIVE ESSAY FOR DIOCESAN 
AUXILIARY SCHOLARSHIP 



To the Presidents of Parish Auxiliaries : 

The Executive Board of the Woman's Auxiliary 
of the Diocese of East Carolina has authorized 
me, as chairman of Promotion of the Woman's 
Auxiliary, to conduct throughout the Diocese a 
Scholarship Contest. The subject is: 

EVANGELISM FIRST— WHY ? 

The PURPOSE of the contest is two-fold; 
namely STUDY and TRAINING. 

1st. STUDY. The Woman's Auxiliary believes 
that its first emphasis must be in the realm of 
the spirit. Next in importance the Auxiliary 
places its educational work. To promote study 
among the women of the Diocese the Executive 
Board of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Diocese 
believes an educational contest will be most help- 
ful. Application and interest, however, will be 
necessary to bring about a productive experience. 

2nd. TRAINING. Two weeks at Kanuga af- 
ford a splendid opportunity for study and train- 
ing. Kanuga is a Conference Center which is the 
seat of Church gatherings all summer long and to 
which thousands of Church members come, and is 
now the largest conference center of the Episco- 
pal Church in the United States. Special con- 
ferences are arranged for groups of different 
ages and different types of study. The effect of 
these conferences has been profound not only in 
stimulating study and training, but also in 
strengthening the ties of fellowship among the 
members of the Episcopal Church in this area. 

Please read this announcement at your very 
first meeting and place contest circular (see cop- 
ies enclosed) in a conspicuous place (bulletin 
board) during the weeks the contest is in pro- 
gress. Invite all women in the parish to join in 
this worthwhile effort. Please, if you have a 
field chairman in your group, give her this an- 
nouncement and contest circular. It will be her 
privilege to promote the contest in her parish and 
to create interest among the women. Please ask 
the cooperation of the women in your Auxiliary 
in the efforts of your field chairman. If you do 
not have a field chairman in your parish, please 
assume the responsibility for this contest your- 
self or appoint someone for this purpose. 

Please note the time limit. All papers must 
be in hand not later than MARCH 15, 1940. 

With best of wishes for the year 1940 in your 
Auxiliary, I am, 

Faithfully yours, 

ELIZABETH B. GREEN 

Promotional Chairman, Woman's Auxiliary 



Subject: "Evangelism First— Why?" 

The Woman's Auxiliary to the National Coun- 
cil in the Diocese of East Carolina announces 
the offer of a Scholarship for the Adult Conference 
in 1940, at Kanuga, Hendersonville, N. C. The 
Scholarship Award is for the best paper on the 
subject : 

"EVANGELISM FIRST— WHY?" 

The judges will be the Rev. Jack R. Rountree, 
Diocesan Chairman of the Commission of Evan- 
gelism, Kinston, N. C, and the Rev. E. F. Moseley, 
Chairman Diocesan Department of Christian Ed- 
ucation, Kinston, N. C. 

Conditions of the Offer 

1. The words used in the essay are to be the 
candidates own. The answer must not be more 
than 2,000 words. 

2. The winner shall study as one of her courses 
at the Kanuga Conference the Program of the 
Church and one or more Auxiliary courses. 

3. Papers must be typed and must NOT be 
marked with the name of the writer. The name 
and the Parish must be enclosed on a separate 
slip. Each paper when received will be given a 
number and will be judged without the name of 
the writer being known. 

4. Entrants in this Contest may be any white 
woman within the Diocese of the age of sixteen 
or over. 

5. Send papers to your Auxiliary Promotional 
Department, Mrs. Charles Green, Chairman, 1312 
Grace Street, Wilmington, N. C. Papers must 
reach her not later than March 15, 1940. 

6. In preparation for writing upon the above 
question, the following texts are suggested. These 
should be secured from the clergy. 

"Half Hour Series", Forward Movement Com- 
mission; "Preaching the Gospel", C. H. Dodd; 
"Master's Method of Winning Men" , D. M. Pratt ; 
"Book of Acts", "Gospel of Matthew", "Gospel 
of Luke", "Epistle to the Romans", "First Epistle 
to the Corinthians", "The Divine Commission", 
Bishop Wilson; "Faith and Practice", Bishop 
Wilson; "The Faith We Declare", Edwin Lewis; 
"Preaching the Gospel", Howard Chandler Rob- 
bins ; "The World Mission of the Church". 

7. Write to Mrs. Charles F. Green for a set 
of questions on the above subject. These ques- 
tions will give you additional food for thought 
and study and help in the preparation of your 
paper. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



CHAPLAIN APPOINTED FOR HOSPITALS 
IN WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA 



The Rev. Westwell Greenwood has been ap- 
pointed by Bishop Gribbin of Western North 
Carolina as the Church's Chaplain at the U. S. 
Veteran's Hospital at Oteen and the Western 
North Carolina State Sanatorium at Black Moun- 
tain. 

There are about 8,000 patients at the Oteen 
Hospital — mostly from North and South Caro- 
lina, Georgia and Florida, with an additional 500 
as a staff. There are about three hundred pa- 
tients — all from various points in this State at 
the Sanitorium at Black Mountain. 

Mr. Greenwood would like to hear from any of 
our readers who have relatives or friends at these 
hospitals and would like to have suggestions as 
to the best means of being of service to them. 

Mr. Greenwood's Post Office address is : Black 
Mountain, or he may be addressed at either hos- 
pital. 



(Continued from Page 9) 
The Diocesan Annual Convention 

Christ Episcopal Church, in Elizabeth City, was 
selected as the site for the 1941 meeting. 

The voting on delegates to the General Con- 
vention, which meets in Kansas City next fall, 
was completed at yesterday morning's session. 
The following were elected as clerical delegates: 

The Rev. Mortimer Glover, of Wilmington; 
the Rev. Alexander Miller, of Wilmington; the 
Rev. John C. Grainger, of Goldsboro ; and the Rev. 
Walter R. Noe, of Wilmington. 

The following were named lay delegates: Geo. 
B. Elliott, of Wilmington ; W. G. Gaither, of Eliza- 
beth City; Guy C. Harding, of Washington; and 
J. Q Beckwith, of Lumberton. 

Those elected to the important Standing Com- 
mittee were: the Rev. Worth Wicker, of Green- 
ville; the Rev. Jack R. Rountree, of Kinston; 
the Rev. C. E. Williams, of New Bern; Guy C. 
Harding, of Washington ; and Alex Cowper, of 
Kinston. 

A resolution expressing appreciation to the 
people of Wilmington for their many courtesies 
and to the newspapers for their cooperation was 
adopted at the closing session. 



REPORT OF THE SURVEY COMMITTEE 



After reports by Major McCullough B. Wilson 
and Rev. Jack R. Rountree for the committee 
appointed at the 1939 Convention to make a 
diocesan survey, the request of the committee 
that it be continued and make its report to the 
next Convention was approved. 



(Continued from Page 2) 
Mr. George B. Elliott's Address 

gladly what he gives, but we take little thought 
of how we might lighten the burden of care he 
carries so manfully. Always he strives to find 
ways of furnishing aid where he knows it is sadly 
needed, and he grieves because he has not the 
means. As one layman writes: "I AM ALSO IM- 
PRESSED WITH THE SEEMING IMPOSSIBLE 
FINANCIAL SITUATION WHICH HE IS TRY- 
ING TO CARRY IN THE DIOCESE." We lay- 
men could help this situation and lighten this 
burden if only we gave him, and his work, more 
of our thought. And, in helping him, we could 
take comfort that we were aiding in the work 
that Christ left for men to do, for that is our 
Bishop's one dominating purpose and intent. 
For twenty-five years he has gone about his 
work among us. Coming to us a stranger, he has 
risen to be the most beloved man in East Carolina. 
He has gone forward unflinching, facing trouble, 
want in some places in his field, lack of interest 
among his people, but never hesitating, never 
doubting, always looking and seeking to lead us 
onward and upward toward that Kingdom of 
God that is his aim and destination. Those of us 
who have been near him know something of the 
struggle, and marvel at the courage that never 
falters. 

God sent him to us, and God through him has 
shown us the power of Love — Charity — in His 
work for this man has exemplified it in his life. 

"And now abideth faith, hope and charity, these 
three ; but the greatest of these is charity." 



DELEGATES ELECTED BY THE WOMAN'S 
AUXILIARY TO THE TRIENNIAL MEET- 
ING TO BE HELD IN KANSAS CITY 
THIS FALL 



Delegates : Mrs. Louis J. Poisson, Wiilmington , 
N. C; Mrs. W. O. S. Sutherland, Wilmington, 
N. C. ; Mrs. Harry G. Walker, Washington, N. C. ; 
Mrs. Donald MacRae, Wilmington, N. C. ; Mrs. 
Charles F. Green, Wilmington, N. C. 

Alternates: Mrs. F. F. Fagan, New Bern, N. C; 
Mrs. John W. Hardy, Williamston, N. C. ; Miss 
Hennie Long, Greenville, N. C. ; Mrs. John R. 
Tolar, Fayetteville, N. C. ; Mrs. Sam Fowle, Wash- 
ington, N. C. 



MEMBERS O* 1 THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 
ELECTED FOR THREE YEARS 



Rev. Charles E. Williams, New Bern, N. C. ; 
Rev. John R. Tolar, Fayetteville, N. C. ; Mr. W. G. 
Gaither, Elizabeth City, N. C; Mr. J. A. Moore, 
Fde^ton. N. C; Mrs. Harry G. Walker, Washing- 
ton, N. C. 



FINAL STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 
GENERAL CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1. 1939 TO DECEMBER 31, 1939 



Convocation of Wilmington 



Pledges 
Reported 
Minimum at 

Beginning 
Responsibility of year 



Parishes 

ufort, St. Paul's 

ton, St. Paul's 

etteville, St. John's 

dsboro, St. Stephen's 

e Mills, Christ Church 

ston, St. Mary's 

iberton, Trinity 

Bern, Christ Church 

Springs, St. Stephen's 

en Springs, Holy Innocents' 

thport, St. Philip's 

ceboro, St. Paul's 

iteville, Grace Church 

mington, Good Shepherd 

mington, St. James' 

mington, St. John's 

mington, St. Paul's 



Parishes 

•ora, Holy Cross 

len, St. James' 

h, St. Thomas' 

haven, St. James' 

inerton, St. John's 

icowinity, Trinity 

umbia, St. Andrew's 

swell, St. David's-$65.00: 

Galilee Mission $25.00 

nton, St. Paul's 

;abeth City, Christ Church 

mville, Emmanuel 

esville, St. Mary's 

enville, St. Paul's 

Eton, St. John's 

nilton, St. Martin's 

"tford, Holy Trinity 

;ama, Zion 

e Landing, St. George's 

nouth, Grace Church 

■er, St. Luke's 



£ 350.00 

150.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

100.00 

1,500.00 

100.00 

2,000.00 

100.00 

200.00 

175.00 

40.00 

100.00 

600.00 

10.000.00 

2,200.00 

1,500.00 



300.00 
75.00 
75.00 
250.00 
100.00 
125.00 
260.00 

325.00 

1,500.00 

1,500.00 

300.00 

200.00 

1,500.00 

100.00 

100.00 

400.00 

125.00 

100.00 

300.00 

100.00 



Parishes 

etteville, St. Joseph's 
v Bern, St. Cyprian's 
mington, St. Mark's .. 



Organized Missions 

haven, St. Mary's 

nton, St. John-Evangelist 
:abeth City, St. Philip's ... 

dsboro, St. Andrew's 

ston, St. Augustine's 

shington, St. Paul's 



350.00 

150.00 

1,600.00 

789.00 

80.00 

1,500.00 

60.00 

1,750.00 

100.00 

150.00 

175.00 

30.00 

60.00 

400.00 

9,000.00 

1,800.00 

1,000.00 



Paid 



1939 



227.60 

150.00 

1.766.44 

915.09 

80.00 

1,500.00 

60.00 

1,676.00 

100.00 

77.20 

138.25 

40.00 

60.00 

425.00 

9,076.25 

2.201.52 

800.00 



Pledges 
Reported 
Minimum at 

Beginning 
Responsibility of year 



Paid 



1939 



Organized Missions 



Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Campbellton, St. Philip-the-A- 

postle 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

*North West, All Soul's 

Pikeville, St. George's 

Trenton, Grace Church, 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 



30.00 



30.00 



30.00 



Unorganized Missions 

Polloksville, Mission 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 



Total $22,440.00 



40.00 


25.00 


40.00 


30.00 


25.00 


33.00 


10.00 


10.00 




50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


25.00 


25.00 


25.00 


20.00 


20.00 


20.00 


40.00 


40.00 


40.01 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


75.00 


75.00 


75.00 


22,440.00 


$19,299.00 


$19,611.36 



150.00 
50.00 
50.00 

250.00 
50.00 

125.00 

175.00 

325.00 
1,200.00 
1,134.33 

300.00 
140.00 

100.00 
100.00 
400.00 
125.00 
150.00 
250.00 
60.00 



Convocation of Edenton 

*Washington, St. Peter's . 

Williamston, Advent 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 



228.19 
75.00 
75.00 

125.64 
50.00 

125.00 
78.55 

90.00 
1,200.00 
1,114.85 
300.00 
131.72 
825.77 
100.00 

40.00 
400.00 

75.05 

38.45 
135.23 

45.35 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas'' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's .. 



2,000.00 


1,500.00 


1,750.00 


250.00 


150.00 


250.00 


250.00 


250.00 


250.00 


100.00 


100.00 


10.50 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


100.00 


60.00 


100.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


40.00 


40.00 


40.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


10.00 


10.00 




125.00 


125.00 


36.00 


50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


20.00 


20.00 


20.00 


150.00 


150.00 


150.00 


40.00 


30.00 


40.00 



Unorganized Missions 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' ... 



50.00 



50.00 



50.00 



$11,230.00 $ 7,979.33 $ 8,310.30 



Convocation of Colored Chureh Workers 



150.00 
400.00 
150.00 



50.00 
125.00 
25.00 
70.00 
85.00 
75.00 



150.00 
375.00 
150.00 



50.00 
125.00 
25.00 
70.00 
85.00 
50.00 



150.00 
400.00 
150.00 



33.01 
125.00 
25.00 
50.00 
71.98 
33.91 



Unorganized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Farmville, St. Timothy's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Had. X-Roads, St. Stephen's .... 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, Brooklyn Mission 



20.00 


30.00 


6.00 


40.00 


40.00 


40.00 


20.00 


15.00 


10.00 


30.00 


30.00 


24.25 


35.00 


30.00 


30.00 


25.00 


25.00 


25.00 


30.00 


30.00 


30.00 



Total $ 1,330.00 $ 1,280.00 $ 1,204.15 



Grand Total $35,000.00 $28,558.33 $29,125.81 



* Final payment made after closing of books. 
** Additional payment made after closing of books. 
***Paid in addition $200.00 on Salary of Educational Director. 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 

RECTOR 



THEY ARE ON SALE IN YOUR PARISH 

LARGE. ATTRACTIVE BOOKLETS 

Printed For the 

SILVER JUBILEE OF BISHOP DARST 

Entitled 

"BISHOP DARST AND EAST CAROLINA 

DURING THE PAST TWENTY-FIVE YEARS" 

Get One for Christmas Price 35 cents 



i i 

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ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment, Christian influences 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



+ — ■ — ■ 



-* 



! I 



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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
Wilmington, N. C. 






THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 

of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 

Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 

Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 

Wilmington, N. C. 



I 

•!• — "' ' — »—»»—»«—» — »- 



INVESTMENTS ! 



We are at all times ready to assist the in- 
vestors in North Carolina in the purchase or 
sale of any type security. 

We specialize in : 

NO^VTH CAROLINA 

STATE, COUNTY AND CITY BONDS 

Local Preferred and Common Stocks 

Please communicate with us if we can be of 
service to you 



Oscar Burnett and Company 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Thomas C. Darst, Jr. Lloyd E. Canady 



McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 

Good -Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 88 12th & Market Sts. 

Wilmington, N. C. 



*. — 






Meares Insurance Agency 

815 Murchison Building 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 

— „„ . — + 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter 
continue her education in a Churrh school. 

MRS. ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, A. M. 

President 

Saint Mary's offers the ]0th, 11th, and 12th grades 
of High School and 2 years College work. All acade- 
mic courses fully accredited by Southern Association. 

General charge $700 including m lion 1n Art, Expres 

sion, Home Economics, Music. 

Gym and Field sports, Horseback Riding, Golf, 
Tennis, 20 acre campus and Indoor Tiled Pool. 

Catalogue and Book of Views 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 






/,ftK>19 41 
LiHtary, U. -. <** 

Chapel Hill i fc. ^< 



£Aj ; »0( 






TLft-^im-it|at-l|tarftt|-$aH-c0mf-lRfU22:i7 



Love and hate cannot both be supreme. Either love 
must perish or hate must die. The world has tried for years 
to find some place where hate and love could live in com- 
promise, but we see now that it can't be done. Think of all 
the treaties and pacts that have been signed in the past 
twenty years with a little wistful longing for peace and 
brotherhood in them, but also with some residue of hatred. 
Nothing remains but hate and fear. If brotherly love is 
to survive it must have first place and that means the Cross 
must be lifted above the guns, — above the monuments of 
military strength and victories. For all races and creeds 
agree that the Cross is the perfect symbol of love. 

—Charles Wells 



o 



yj 



FEBRUARY 






1940 




THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
Editor 
REV. WALTER R. NOE 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Associate Editor 
REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 
Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 



EVANGELISM 



One fact has stood out in our minds of late. 
The paramount need of the Church today, as of 
old, is still the emphasis upon evangelism. The 
presenting of the story of a God, who out of His 
great love for man, sent his Only Son to recon- 
cile us unto Himself. But it is an evangelism 
that is lived and deeply felt by the evangelist, 
who can say to his hearers, "Come thou with us 
and we shall do thee good". It is only after we 
have found Jesus as a reality in our own lives that 
we can make Him real to others. But this sim- 
ple and profound truth that God was in Christ 
and through His Holy Spirit is still living among 
men is the deepest need of the human heart to- 
day. Mankind wants to know God — know Him 
as a reality with whom one can have personal re- 
lationships and through whom one may find life. 
It isn't argument, but a deep-felt experience of 
God that man needs. 

Man can know about God in his mind and accept 
Him as a fact. The very devils trembled in the 
presence of Jesus, whom they knew for what he 
was, but they remained devils. It is such a knowl- 
edge of God that we can say with Jesus "Our 
Father", and know that He hears and cares and 
shares our every experience. We know Him 
through what we see in Jesus, as the Holy Spirit 
enlightens our minds and warms our hearts with 
the glow of divine love. And when we have found 
him we must by the very force of inner compul- 
sion, "Go and find some other and bring him to 
Jesus". 



This is our need today, as Christians, to have 
such a personal experience of Jesus that we can 
not rest until we have "told others the story". 
The early Church was born out of the testimony 
of men, who were filled with the Spirit of Christ, 
so that men took knowledge of them that they 
had been with Jesus. 

It is the preaching of the good news of God's 
love, as seen in Jesus, that turned the world up- 
side down in the days of the early church. And 
it is that which will turn the world upside down 
today. That and that alone. No program that 
is not rooted and grounded in the evangelistic 
spirit will awaken the Church, and cause men to 
say, "Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?" 

So let us during the Lenten season ponder our 
call, as followers of Christ, to learn the meaning 
of witnessing to the power of God through faith 
in Christ Jesus, which indeed "has made us 
whole". 

JACK R. ROUNTREE 



RESOLUTION OF THE ANNUAL 
CONVENTION 



Resolved: That the Department of Finance be 
and same is hereby directed to consolidate the in- 
debtedness of the Diocese existing on January 1, 
1939, with the unpaid indebtedness incurred dur- 
ing the year 1939; and apportion the aggregate 
amount thereof among the different parishes and 
missions on the basis of their respective number 
of communicants and that each said parish and 
mission be requested to assume direct responsi- 
bility for the amounts so determined to be their 
proper share thereof and that each parish and 
mission be given credit for the amounts paid by 
them respectively on their said shares as request- 
ed in the resolutions passed by the conferences at 
Washington and White Lake and the Co-ordina- 
tion Committee appointed by Bishop Darst. 



BISHOPS APPOINMENTS FOR MARCH 



3 — Church of the Holy Cross, Aurora, 11:00 
A. M. 
St. John's, Bonnerton, 3:00 P. M. 
St. Jude's, Aurora, 7:30 P. M. 
10— St. Peter's, Washington, 11:00 A. M. 
11-15 — -Lenten Noonday services, Norfolk, Va. 
17_St. James', Wilmington, 11:00 A. M. 
St. John's, Wilmington, 8:00 P. M. 
19 — Community Church, Penderlea Farm, 7:30 

P. M. 
24 — Easter Day, Good Shepherd, Wilmington, 

11:00 A. M. 
31_St. Paul's, Wilmington, 11:15 A. M. 
Other services for March to be announced later. 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C, FEBRUARY, 1940 



NUMBER 2 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



As the last issue of the Mission Herald did not 
contain an account of my January activities, I 
will give a brief resume of them in this letter so 
that we may keep the records straight. 

On January fourth, at her late residence in 
Wilmington, I assisted her Rector in conducting 
the funeral of our dear friend, Mrs. Lila Adams. 
She was and IS one of the most radiant souls I 
have ever known and in that beautiful place to 
which she has gone, and where she will be so per- 
fectly at home, she will continue to inspire and 
help us, as we struggle on toward that Light in 
which she has always dwelt. For her life and 
ministry we thank God and take courage. 

On January sixth, the Feast of the Epiphany, 
I observed the twenty-fifth anniversary of my 
consecration as Bishop of East Carolina by cele- 
brating the Holy Communion in St. James' 
Church, Wilmington, at 11:00 A. M. 

On Sunday, the seventh, at 11:00 A. M., I con- 
ducted the service, made an address and celebrat- 
ed Holy Communion in St. Paul's Church, Wil- 
mington, in the absence of the Rector, the Rev. 
Alexander Miller, who is, we are happy to report, 
starting on the road to recovery after an extended 
illness. 

On the ninth, tenth and eleventh, I had the priv- 
ilege, assisted by Mrs. Woodward of St. Louis, and 
Canon Symons of Cincinnati, of conducting a con- 
ference on the Forward Movement in the Cathe- 
dral of West Missouri, in Kansas City. 

On the afternoon of the seventeenth, I conduct- 
ed a funeral in St. James' Church, Wilmington. 

On the evening of the eighteenth, I attended a 
meeting of the Executive Committee of the Ka- 
nuga Board of Managers in Trinity Parish House, 
Columbia, S. C. On the following day, in the 
same place, I attended a meeting of the Kanuga 
Board of Managers. 

On Sunday, the twenty-first, in the absence of 
the Rector, who was kept away on account of ill- 
ness, I celebrated Holy Communion in St. James' 
Church, Wilmington, at 8:00 A. M., and conducted 
services and preached at 11:00 A. M. In the af- 
ternoon I conducted a funeral in a private home 
in Wilmington. 

From Tuesday evening, the twenty-third, 
through Thursday, the twenty-fifth, I was happily 
engaged in connection with the Annual Meeting 
of the Diocesan Convention and Woman's Auxil- 
iary and the celebration of my twenty-fifth anni- 
versary. The last number of The Mission Herald 



contained a full account of those blessed inspir- 
ing days, so I will not attempt to recount them in 
this letter, but I must say again how humbly 
grateful I am for all the kind words and wishes 
that came to me personally and through letters 
and telegrams on that never-to-be-forgotten oc- 
casion. I have tried to express in another part 
of this issue of The Mission Herald my loving ap- 
preciation of the generous gift of my young peo- 
ple. 

On the evening of the twenty-fifth, I assisted 
at a wedding in St. John's Church, Wilmington. 

On the evening of the twenty-seventh, I offici- 
ated at a wedding in St. James' Church, Wilming- 
ton. 

On Sunday morning, the twenty-eighth, I 
preached and celebrated Holy Communion in 
St. Paul's Church, Clinton. Mr. Douglas Dowdy, 
one of our East Carolina Theological students 
who is pursuing his course at the DuBose School 
Monteagle, Tenn., is serving St. Paul's during his 
winter vacation. 

On the afternoon of the twenty-eighth, I at- 
tended a Community Conference in St. James' 
Parish House, Wilmington. 

On Monday evening, the twenty-ninth, I made 
an address at a congregational meeting in St. 
Martin's Church, Charlotte, of which my dear 
friend, the Rev. John L. Jackson, D. D., Bishop- 
elect of Louisiana, has been beloved Rector for 
twenty-six years. 

On Tuesday, the thirtieth, I attended the an- 
nual meeting of the Board of Managers of the 
Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte. 

On Sunday, February fourth, at 11:00 A. M., I 
preached in the Community Hall, Penderlea 
Farms. 

On Tuesday, the sixth, I attended the helpful 
Clergy Retreat in St. Mary's Church, Kinston, 
and made an address. 

On Ash Wednesday, the seventh, I celebrated 
Holy Communion in St. Paul's Church, Wilming- 
ton at 10:30 A. M. In the evening I conducted 
services and preached in St. John's Church, Wil- 
mington. 

On Thursday and Friday, the eighth and ninth, 
I preached at the Lenten Noonday services in 
Raleigh. 

On Sunday, the eleventh, I made my annual 
visit to Chapel Hill, preaching and confirming 
five persons in the Chapei of the Cross at 11:00 
A. M., and making an address at the Student Fo- 
rum at 7:00 P. M. 

In closing this letter may I urge that we make 



THE MISSION HERALD 



this Lenten season a period of real repentance for 
our sins of indifference, and may we strive to re- 
move from our lives the canker of worldliness. 

In view of the sin and hate that hang like a 
pall over our world today, the Church and every 
member of the same must come back to God in 
all humility in order that we may learn His will 
for us and for our world and then in His name and 
power, go out to show His way to those stumbling 
children of His who have lost the road that leads 
to peace. 

Shall we continue to play with religion while 
Jesus is being crucified again? 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



UNITED THANK OFFERING CORPORATE 
COMMUNION AT THE ANNUAL MEETING 



THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



March Calendar 

Palm Sunday 17 

Maundy Thursday 21 

Good Friday '. 22 

Easter Sunday 24 

Garden Week, the words bring to mind a pleas- 
ant day, agreeable companions, visiting gardens 
that are full of early spring flowers, and enjoy- 
ing the houses that are open to the public. Why 
not have in East Carolina a Pilgrimage Week? 
There are several places we Auxiliary women 
could visit with pleasure and profit. 

April, when the yellow jasmine perfumes the 
air, the dogwood blooms forth in all its beauty, the 
birds building their nests and nature is beckon- 
ing to us to come enjoy ourselves for a day along 
the highway, then is the time to make the Pil- 
grimage to the Good Shepherd Hospital, New 
Bern, Galilee Mission, Lake Phelps, St. Thomas' 
Church, Bath, and the Inland Waterway Mis- 
sions. 

There were several Auxiliary women from East 
Carolina who attended the Adult Conference at 
Kanuga Lake last summer, Mrs. Donald McRae, 
Mrs. W. O. S Sutherland, Mrs. Charles Green, 
Miss Lucy Holland, Miss Hennie Long, Mrs. Al- 
wyn Darden, Mrs. A. C. D. Noe and Rev. and 
Mrs. John Tolar. Bishop and Mrs. Darst and 
Margaret were there. The Rev. and Mrs. Harry 
Ross Jackson were there during the Young Peo- 
ple's Conference. Kanuga is now the largest Con- 
ference center of the Episcopal Church in the 
United States. 

The Good Shepherd Hospital, New Bern, is 
always glad to receive supplies. Your Diocesan 
chairman will give you a list of supplies needed 
by the hospital. Let this be your Lenten Box 
work. 



The Fifty-second Annual Meeting of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary in the Diocese of East Carolina 
convened in St. James' Church, Wilmington, 
Wednesday, January 24th. The President's pro- 
gram for the meeting included a United Thank 
Offering Corporate Communion," which on 
Thursday morning, January 25th, at 7:30, was 
celebrated by Bishop Darst, assisted by three of 
the young Clergy of his fold. It is believed that 
the memory of this service will be held dear by 
those who had part in it, — a large congregation 
of women and men. 

The women who had its preparation in charge 
recalled so vividly the beauty of that Triennial 
Presentation Service in Cincinnati in October, 
1937, that they planned to follow — although in a 
very small way, of course — the lead of those 
women who had made the physical aspect of that 
service so wonderfully beautiful. Their hope 
was 'that, through the unusual features intro- 
duced, perhaps some who had not been privileged 
to attend a Triennial Corporate Communion of 
the women of the whole Church might form at 
least a slight idea of the beauty and the glory of 
such an early morning service. And their prayer 
was that some women who might not as yet have 
caught the vision would, through participation 
in this Corporate Communion, arrive at an under- 
standing of the real meaning of the United Thank 
Offering, the spiritual value of which is so surely 
realized by all who share in it lovingly. 

As to the physical beauty of this service, the 
efforts of the women who planned it were re- 
warded. The 100 or more Easter lilies, (gifts 
from thankful hearts) were beautifully arranged 
for the adornment of the altar. And a full vested 
choir added to the worship and the praise of the 
service. The processional hymn was "God is 
Working His Purpose Out". The recessional, 
'The King of Love My Shepherd is." 

As at Triennial United Thank Offering pre- 
sentation services, the Treasurers or Custodians 
of all Dioceses and Missions throughout the world 
sit in the front seats and have the privilege and 
joy of going forward and placing in the great 
golden alms basin the amounts of the offerings 
of prayer and gifts and joyful service of the wo- 
men they represent, so, at this United Thank 
Offering Corporate Communion of the women of 
East Carolina, the custodians of the different 
Parishes and Missions sat in the front pews. At 
the beginning of the singing of the hymn, "Holy 
Offerings, Rich and Rare," the custodians ad- 
vanced to the altar rail and each placed in the 



FEBRUARY, 1940 



alms basin one of the little blue United Thank 
Offering envelopes which contained a paper re- 
cording the name of her parish, her name and 
the amount of the gifts of the women she had 
served during the two years of this Triennium, 
1938 and 1939. 

At the same time, five young girls, officers of 
the different branches of the Young People's 
Service League in this community, took the of- 
fering from the congregation and came forward 
to place it in the alms basin for presentation by 
our Bishop. These girls were uniformly attired 
in white, wore Madonna blue veils, and took the 
offering in blue bags which had been made for 
this purpose, and which will be used for similar 
services throughout the Diocese. 

Undoubtedly, the always solemn beauty of a 
celebration of the Holy Communion was en- 
hanced by the successful carrying out of the plans 
undertaken; and this United Thank Offering 
Corporate Communion of the Women of East Car- 
olina, celebrated in St. James' Church, Wilming- 
ton, was a most helpful, impressive and beauti- 
ful service. 



ADDRESS OF MRS. JAMES G. STATON AT 

ANNIVERSARY SERVICE AT THE 

CONVENTION 



It is a privilege to speak for the women of East 
Carolina expressing appreciation of our beloved 
Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Thomas Campbell Darst, 
D. D. 

When Bishop Strange of sainted memory re- 
alized he must leave us he expressed no doubt 
about the advancement of his work in East Car- 
olina. He said he knew the work would go for- 
ward as it was God's work and God would raise 
up a man to carry it on. That faith has been 
justified. We have the man! 

In our financial obligations we women have 
tried to merit the confidence placed in us. Each 
year we have paid in full the task set. Since our 
Auxiliary Resolution of last year we have tried 
to gain greater knowledge of General Church and 
Diocesan pledges. We have tried to serve in wip- 
ing out the Diocesan Debt. Perhaps one short 
year has been too limited a time to show tangi- 
bly our interest. We are interested. We have 
not forgotten our Resolution. We do pledge anew 
ourselves to help carry on with the work of 1940 
in order that there be no Diocesan Deficit — no 
National Deficit. In this effort we ask the guid- 
ance of the Clergy. Regardless of the freedom 
given women these days we do need the encour- 
agement and leadership of the Rectors in order to 
be more faithful and loyal to our Bishop. 



For the spiritual side of our appreciation regard- 
ing Bishop Darst, we thank God and take cour- 
age. After working together for twenty-five 
years we can repeat the opinion we formed, when 
he first came among us, that Bishop Darst is a 
great spiritual force. We needed that force then, 
we need it even worse now. We appreciate the 
fact that in this day and time when many are 
indifferent and careless we have a Bishop who 
faithfully and fearlessly believes in the God he 
preaches, in the faith once delivered to the Saints. 
We appreciate the fact that Bishop Darst takes 
a firm stand for the truths of the eternal God. 
He knows and we know through him that our 
Redeemer lives. 

We women admire Bishop Darst because he 
lives a life of kindness, that very rare and dif- 
ficult virtue. He is always gracious, kind and 
forgiving. He inspires us to follow his example 
of thinking no evil, but believing the good in 
all men. 

Bishop Darst has inspired in the Women of 
East Carolina a devotion and loyalty which we 
pledge him shall be his in the years to come, as 
we go from this happy occasion celebrating his 
twenty-five years of leadership. 

FANNIE CHASE STATON. 
St. James' Church 
Wilmington, N. C. 
January 24, 1940. 



REV. F. A. TURNER ACCEPTS CALL TO 
GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMINGTON 



The Rev. F. A. Turner of Lake Landing has 
accepted a call to the Good Shepherd, Wilmington 
and has notified the vestry that he will arrive 
in Wilmington in time for the services on the 
first Sunday in March. 

Mr. Turner was with the Church Army for a 
number of years and spent right much of the time 
in the Diocese of East Carolina. 

After his Ordination, he was placed in charge 
of the Churches in Hyde County, St. George's 
Lake Landing; Calvary, Swan Quarter; All 
Saints', Fairfield and St. John's, Sladesville. 

In preparation for the celebration of the 25th 
Anniversary of the Consecration of Bishop Darst, 
Mr. Turner prepared and published the Booklet: 
"Bishop Darst and East Carolina during the Past 
Twenty-five Years". 



PALMETTO PALMS FOR SALE! 
$5.00 per hundred 

by Woman's Auxiliary 

Address: Mrs. M. B. Thompson 

Aurora N. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Jr 



THE DIOCESAN DEBT 



The recent Convention of the Diocese di- 
rected that the Diocesan Debt be apportioned 
among the different parishes and missions 
on the basis of their respective number of 
communicants, and that each said parish and 
mission be requested to assume direct re- 
sponsibility for the amounts so determined 
to be their proper share thereof. A meeting 
ing of the Diocesan Debt Committee, the 
Co-ordination Committee appointed by the 
Bishop on the Debt and certain leaders on 
the Debt named by the Bishop will be held 
in Greenville February 15th. At this meet- 
ing the Resolution of the Convention will 
be worked out, the responsibility of each 
parish and mission fixed, and they will be 
asked to have the amount assigned them in 
the hands of the treasurer, the Rev. E. F. 
Moseley, Kinston, Whitsunday. We have 
many parishes and missions which have nev- 
er measured up to their responsibility on 
this debt, leaving it to others to take care 
of their share of the debt. In a few instances 
this is understandable. In most cases it is 
just plain want of work and interest. But 
now that this determined effort faces us, 
there must be no more slacking. 

The debt is $16,750 as of February 6th. 
By no means a great sum for this Diocese 
to raise in one effort. I feel more encour- 
aged about this proposition than at any time 
since I came in the Diocese some six years 
ago and found a deficit. For the sake of our 
beloved Bishop; for the sake of the good 
name of the Diocese; for the sake of get- 
ting more for our Diocesan work, because 
this debt obscures other needed endeavors, 
and the interest shortens our hands., we 
must hear no more that the debt is not im- 
portant. It is important. It must be paid 
if we are to go forward. 

The Bishop's Memorial Anniversary Fund 
Committee consists of the Revs. C. A. Ash- 
by, Mortimer Glover, John R. Tolar, Worth 
Wicker, Chas. E. Williams, E. F. Moseley; 
Messrs. W. G. Gaither, W. E. Pace, A. K. 
Barrus, McC. B. Wilson ; Madams L. J. Pois- 
son, Thomas F. Darden, J. G. Staton and 
Miss Mae Wood Winslow. The Bishop is 
asking Messrs. W. B. Campbell and Stanley 
Woodland and has named, with some who 
are on the fund committee, as leaders in the 



Debt endeavor Revs. J. R. Rountree, Stephen 
Gardner, F. A. Turner, Wood Gaither, E. T. 
Jillson, John Hardy, John Armfield, John 
C. Grainger, W. Tate Young, Messrs. John 
Haywood Jones, John Home, Guy C. Hard- 
ing, H. W. Marsh, Earl Cahoon, Wm. Hud- 
son, Lewis Daniels, James Smith, W. D. Holt 
and T. F. Darden. A comely committee, 
representative of all parts of the Diocese. 

The Diocese has been divided into districts, 
with leaders in each district, who will present 
the matter there, and try to see that full pay- 
ment comes from that section. 

Whitsunday is the day. All of us will be 
seen about this debt. I hope all of us realize 
it must be paid, and that this attempt is our 
tribute to Bishop Darst. He wants the debt 
out of the v/ay. We are to indicate our ap- 
preciation of his twenty-five years of lead- 
ership by cancelling this debt. It can be done. 
It will be done. Some may wish to raise 
their quota on Easter. Others to canvass for 
same. Members of the committee and the 
leaders in your district stand ready to aid in 
every possible way. They will get over their 
districts explaining this thing. Splendid 
ground work has been laid in the meetings 
held on the subject. The hot air days are 
now over, and time of an every-member re- 
sponse has come. We rely on the good peo- 
ple of East Carolina to relieve their Bishop 
and Diocese of this incumbrance. 

C. A. ASHBY, 

Chairman of Debt Committee. 

February 9, 1940. 

P. S. The Anniversary Memorial Com- 
mittee met in Greenville, February 15th. 
After much discussion it decided to refer the 
matter of Debt to the Finance Committee, 
adding certain laymen named by the Bishop 
thereto in handling the matter. The Com- 
mittee changed its name to the Diocesan 
Debt Committee, and passed into liquida- 
tion. Its usefulness seemed at an end. Bish- 
op Darst did or did not say, the above was 
the best letter he had ever read, so let it go 
in, though our Committee is moribund. The 
Rev. John Tolar now takes over as Chairman 
of the Finance Committee. Best of success 
to him. 



V 



4* 



FEBRUARY, 1940 



AN EARLY LENT 



By the Rt. Rev. Frank W. Creighton, S. T. D., 
Bishop 



Lent is early this year. Only once since 1900 
has Easter fallen on a date as early as March 24. 
Many people feel that there should be a fixed 
date for Easter, the same as Christmas or Inde- 
pendence Day. And we have to admit that the 
way Easter Day is designated, does make for 
confusion and in some instances pecuniary loss. I 
do not think there would be any great objection 
to having it on a fixed date. It is just a matter 
of the various Churches getting together and do- 
ing something which ought to have been done 
long before. 

The rule for finding Easter Day is: that "it is 
always the First Sunday after the Full Moon 
which happens upon or next after the 21st day of 
March; and if the Full Moon happens upon a 
Sunday, Easter Day is the Sunday after." But, 
"the Full Moon for the purpose of this rule is 
the Fourteenth Day of a Lunar Month reckoned 
according to an ancient Ecclesiastical computa- 
tion, and not the real or Astronomical Full Moon. 

The General Convention of our Church passed 
a resolution in 1934 endorsing the proposal to 
stabilize Easter, and again recorded its endorse- 
ment in the last General Convention in 1937. 
That is about as far as we Episcopalians have 
gone in the matter. But, it will come up in future 
General Conventions and we shall have to do a 
little more than "endorse proposals" if we are go- 
ing to get anywhere with the idea of a fixed Eas- 
ter. 

But for the present year, 1940, we shall be 
keeping Ash Wednesday on February 7. Then, 
our Lenten Season begins. And as loyal mem- 
bers of the Church we shall want to observe it as 
a Holy Season and receive its blessings — for they 
are many. 

We are living in an era which, while it is not 
entirely Godless, is decidedly indifferent to Him 
and His religion. In some instances He has been 
defied and His religion scorned. Men have put 
His justice, His mercy and His love out of their 
hearts. Perhaps we have been guilty of that. 
We are callous to suffering, indifferent to crime, 
and insensible to the plight of hapless people 
who are not in our immediate environment. It 
has all meant a numbness of the kind of sensibil- 
ities which were keen in our Lord when He was 
here upon earth. For He was alert to every kind 
of human suffering, mental, physical or spiritual. 
It means that He and all He stood for have become 
vague in our minds. God and His religion have 



become matters of indifference. And that is a 
serious thing. 

Would not this Lent be a fitting time for us 
to bring our own minds into touch with the mind 
of Christ, to conform to it, to make it our own. 
We can do it by a closer walk with Him, by know- 
ing Him better, by attending the Lenten services 
of our Churches, by being more zealous in prayer. 
And we must remember that we can never fully 
commend a thing unless we are interested in it. 
Bring someone else to God, to the Church, as an 
evidence of your devotion. 



'INASMUCH" 



In the Province of Sewanee the name of Robert 
Fletcher stands high among those who love and 
serve their fellowmen. Overcoming obstacles and 
hardships that would seem well nigh impossible 
to most of us, he faithfully carries on with a 
group of people who many of us have neither 
time nor inclination to minister to. Surely the least 
that we can do is to stand behind this man of 
God and send him forth adequately equipped for 
the task of making Jesus and His love known to 
those deaf and blind brothers of ours in this 
Province. From his meager salary he is trying 
to pay for a second-hand car which would enable 
him to cover much more ground. 

He needs funds for many things, but especially 
for leaflets and books to distribute among his 
communicants. He needs an amplifier which 
would save his voice when speaking *to large 
groups. 

Bishop Carpenter says "Mr. Fletcher is doing 
a wonderfully fine work and it is growing all the 
time, which means ever increasing demands upon 
his time." 

We, the Committee from the Department of 
Missions and Church Extension, have faith to 
believe that all that is necessary to raise this 
money is the knowledge of the need of it, so we 
are trusting that every one who reads this ap- 
peal will want to send something — small or large 
— in order that they too may have a share in 
this marvelous work, which Mr. Fletcher is do- 
ing. Even before this goes to print, fifty dol- 
lars have been sent in. 

Contributions may be sent to Mr. Warren Kear- 
ney, 709 Louisiana Building, New Orleans, Lou- 
isiana, or to Mrs. Joe E. Hart, York, South Car- 
olina. 

Committee: 

MRS. A. M. STERNE, 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN, 

REV. PRENTICE A. PUGH. 



8 



THE MISSION HERALD 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE STATE 

OF THE CHURCH TO THE 57TH ANNUAL 

CONVENTION OF THE DIOCESE OF 

EAST CAROINLA, JANUARY 24TH 

1940, AT WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Your committee feels inclined to evaluate the 
state of the Church, this year, not upon facts that 
lie upon the surface and can be measured in terms 
of statistics and mathematics, but upon those 
underlying and spiritual realities that lie deep 
down under the surface of the organism and be- 
speak a virility and life that give meaning and 
value to personality — be it individual or corpo- 
rate. 

Neither figures indicating physical and nu- 
merical growth or decline, nor observations as to 
increase or decrease of financial support are a true 
index of Church vitality in such times as these. 
For a rapidly expanding paganization and secu- 
larization of modern living, and increasing eco- 
nomic uncertainty, together with increasing po- 
litical tensions and international antagonism have 
resulted in a practical eclipse of spiritual reali- 
ties, which are world-wide and necessarily affect 
the life and thought of the peoples in every home 
and hamlet throughout the whole world. 

So it seems unreasonable that any estimation of 
the state of the Church — even in our own Diocese 
of East Carolina — should be based upon statistical 
reports, but upon certain intangibles whose exist- 
ence is indicated by a general tendency of our peo- 
ple to inquire into causes and seek to discover a 
solution of religious problems, not in terms of in- 
creasing activities and multiplication of programs, 
but in discovering the will of God, His purpose 
for man and an endeaver to enter into more inti- 
mate relations of devotion and loyalty to Him. 

This is a time of stress, when the chaff is be- 
ing winnowed from the wheat, and it may well be 
that untold good may result from the winnowing. 
Our thought is not so much as to the numerical 
growth of the diocese and the state of its finances, 
as to what indication is there that the Church is 
awakening to a sense of its responsibility to God 
and to do its part in establishing the Kingdom 
of God in that part of the world where the duty 
of the Diocese, as a part of the Church of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, lies. 

We are further of the conviction that the mul- 
tiplication of programs tends to divert activity 
from our main purpose to help God reconcile the 
world unto Himself, through faith in Jesus 
Christ, His Son, and by the power of the Holy 
Spirit. It is in the integration of its life about 



the personality of that Great Lover of Mankind, 
and the correlation of its programs and activities 
about working together with Him that our splen- 
did spiritual resources are to become effective. 

With due apologies to those statistically mind- 
ed folk who judge growth by increasing confirma- 
tions and a balanced budget, we confidently be- 
lieve that the Church has been undergoing a real 
spiritual awakening, during the past few years, 
and that the evangelistic spirit and missionary 
fervor have been growing and deepening. Among 
an increasing number of our clergy and laity there 
is a searching of heart and turning to God with the 
belief that "if ye seek me ye shall find me, when 
ye seek for me with all your heart." 

Missions held throughout the Diocese during the 
past few years have aroused a turning towards 
God that is most truly indicative of religious 
growth. Our people are giving more thought to 
God and His Church. These things are not meas- 
urable in statistics, but in an improving quality 
of spiritual life and a deepening sense of respon- 
sibility. And upon those things depend the even- 
tual increase in numerical growth and financial 
support. 

Your committe notes, perhaps, some slight in- 
crease in numerical strength — nor does it look 
with anxiety upon reports indicating in some 
places a seeming decrease. What has happened 
in many of our Churches during the past year has 
been a re-examination of the membership rolls, 
with the determination to have them represent 
the actual membership of the local congregation, 
and not an imperfect one. One Church recently 
made a full investigation of its membership roll 
and found that it had been reporting the names 
of many long since deceased, some who had placed 
their membership in other fields without so re- 
porting, and some, who "just didn't care". 

So we would advise that figures of decrease 
should be considered with caution, before one 
speaks pessimistically. 

We have noted disparaging remarks in other 
reports of former committees as to the condition 
of our rural Sunday Schools. We doubt that facts 
are as bad as some would suggest. It is true that 
economic conditions have seriously affected condi- 
tions in our rural areas and many have been forced 
from the farms to cities and larger towns. But 
many of our rural schools are doing a fine piece 
of work. 

We notice the charge that in the past there has 
been lack of leadership and teachers in the rural 
Sunday Schools. But we have heard similar re- 
marks from many city and town churches, from 
Carolina to California. Yet we have observed 



FEBRUARY, 1940 



9 






that rural Sunday Schools are keeping on and 
doing the best under the circumstances. 

With the plea from the Department of Education 
for an educational field worker, we are heartily 
in accord provided that field worker be one who 
is thoroughly familiar with and trained in the 
problems of the small country and rural field, 
and devote most of the time to those areas in help- 
ing the inefficient schools to work out a program 
of curricula, etc., that will increase their effi- 
ciency and make them of greater value in relig- 
ious educational activities. 

We are fully convinced that the program of the 
Department of Evangelism which was submitted 
to and adopted by the Clergy Conferences and 
Convocations, should be carefully carried out by 
all of the Churches in the Diocese. This pro- 
gram will increase the spiritual life of the Church, 
with a resultant increase of responsibility to 
maintain and support the work of the Diocese. 

We feel that the work of the Departments of 
the Executive Council should be better correlated. 
It is our conviction that every department 
should submit its program to the Executive 
Council, and that it should be carefully considered 
by the entire council on its individual merits and 
upon its relation to the programs of other depart- 
ments. This would make it possible to prevent 
conflicts and irresponsible action. .After due con- 
sideraton by the council, the program should — 
if and as amended — be adopted by the Executive 
Council as the program of the Diocese and the 
department then charged with the responsibility 
to promote and carry it out. 

No department should be permitted — not even 
the Promotional department — to present a pro- 
gram until it has been fully considered and ac- 
cepted by the Executive Council. For this reason 
we feel that the Convention should insist that 
the Executive Council meet more regularly and 
less hurriedly and give thought and deliberation 
to the work of the Diocese. Its work is of utmost 
importance to the Diocese, and it should feel a 
responsibility to perform its duty, and the de- 
partments should consider their obligations to 
have their plans and programs subjected to the 
criticism and review of the council before they 
are published and promoted. 

We are of the conviction that the new Church 
Pension Fund Committee should make a full and 
complete status of the condition of the Pension 
Fund and that an effort should be made to bring 
the Pension Fund payments up to date. 

A source of considerable confusion to the 
leadership of the Churches is in large measure 
due to lack of certain information. The 



acts of and reports to the Convention should be 
available to the Church leadership within a rea- 
sonable time after the close of the Convention. 
We believe that it is a false economy that causes 
delay in publication of the Convention Journal. 
We therefore believe that the Convention should 
order the publication of the Journal within sixty 
days after the adjournment. 

Another matter of concern is the lack of infor- 
mation as to just what the Canons of the Diocese 
are. Few of us know whether or not we are act- 
ing within the Canons. We therefore suggest 
that the Canons of the Diocese should be ordered 
printed within sixty days after the adjournment 
of this Convention. 

Your committee is further of the conviction that 
considerable aid could be rendered the Churches 
of the Diocese if there were regular visitation 
by the executive office to consider the condition 
of the various Churches, their problems, and ad- 
vice and assistance rendered in the solutions of 
those problems. We are of the conviction that 
the contract between the Diocese and the mission- 
ary clergy is such that it is incumbent upon the 
Diocesan office to assist the Missionary Clergy 
in securing the fulfillment of its obligations by 
local congregations. Few Clergy are financial 
wizards, nor should they be. Their first duty is 
that of a Holy Priesthood and Prophetic Minis- 
try that should not be overly encumbered with 
mere financial duties. Only through the help of 
the Diocesan office can the Clergy receive that 
fair treatment to which as clergy they are en- 
titled. 

From all over the Diocese there has come the 
plea, "Sirs, we would see Jesus". We want to 
know God". It seems to us that that is the first 
duty of the Clergy and preacher; to help men 
and women see and know God. Therefore we sug- 
gest that the Clergy give more careful attention 
to the study of the Word of God, with a view to 
finding it part and parcel of their lives, so that 
through them the light might shine. Despite 
modern trends in secularizing thought, and eco- 
nomic trends and social upheavals, the great need 
of our people is still, "Jesus Christ and Him cru- 
cified". Let us not be "ashamed of the gospel, for 
it is still the power of God unto salvation". 

May we close our report with the plea that we 
make a strong determination, this year, to en- 
throne God as King of kings and Lord of lords, 
and that we, as Christians, be about our Fath- 
er's business. 

Committee on the State of the Church. 
JACK R. ROUNTREE, 

Chairman 



IJoung People's Service League 



By Mary D. Home, Publicity Chairman 



A LETTER FROM THE BISHOP 



Wilmington, N. C, 
February 5, 1940. 
My beloved Leaguers: 

There were many high spots in connection 
with my twenty-fifth anniversary celebration on 
the evening of January 24th, many words were 
spoken that I shall treasure in my heart forever, 
but I can say with all truth that the supreme 
moments of that memorable occasion were made 
possible through the love and loyalty of my young 
people as expressed in the beautiful speech of 
Belle Ray Tillinghast and the generous gift 
presented on your behalf by Hampton Noe. 

I wish that I could thank each one of you per- 
sonally, but as that is impossible I am writing 
this letter to every League in the Diocese in 
order to express my pride and joy in being per- 
mitted to call you my comrades and my friends. 

In presenting this generous gift of more than 
fifty dollars, Hampton expressed your thought- 
ful desire that I might use it for a little vacation, 
and this I hope to do next Summer. It should be 
the happiest vacation I have ever known, for I 
shall be realizing every moment of the time that 
it was made possible by the loving and generous 
interest of our beloved young people. 

Looking forward with joy to seeing you all at 
Camp Leach next Summer, I am, 

Your affectionate friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, TOLAR HART, 
FAYETTEVILLE 



The latest activity of our League, in the field 
of service is helping renovate the Parish House. 
We have bought new curtains for the windows 
and are planning to mend and paint the chairs 
and put new pictures on the walls. 

Our first two programs in Lent will be discus- 
sion programs on the "Why" of Lent, so that 
we may better understand this season of the 
Church Year. . 

HELEN BARRETT, 
Good Shepherd, Tolar Hart, Fayetteville. 



ST. JOHNS, FAYETTEVILLE 



Since our last article in the Mission Herald, we 
have had some very interesting programs. One 
Sunday night we had a joint meeting with another 
League. This meeting proved very helpful and 



enjoyable. We had a very interesting and in- 
structive program about Bishop Darst. One of 
the members attended a celebration for the Bish- 
op in Wilmington, and she gave a very good re- 
port on that meeting. We had a program on per- 
sonal evangelism. 

Some of our members sold books on "Bishop 
Darst and East Carolina During the Past Twen- 
ty-five years." We had a Fellowship Supper Feb- 
ruary 4th. Every one enjoyed it. The Diocesan 
Representative wrote and mailed letters to twen- 
ty associate members. We sent flowers to one 
of our members who was sick in the hospital. 
ANN GRAHAM TILLINGHAST, 

Diocesan Representative. 



ST. JAMES', WILMINGTON 



Here is the report for the Searchlight from St. 
James' Y. P. .S L. 

Our League fixed a Christmas box for Cala- 
bash, our prayer partner, consisting of scrap 
books, numbers of books donated by members of 
league and then we made ornaments for their 
tree. We also had a pageant called "The Great 
Book," commemorating the one hundred and fif- 
tieth anniversary of the American Prayer Book. 

Our League attended the "Feast of the Lights" 
service at St. John's on Epiphany. During the 
past week several of our members visited Cala- 
bash and took pictures of the children in the 
mission and saw what conditions were there. 
Yours truly, 

LULA PULLIAM, 
Publicity Chairman St. James' Y. P. S. L. 



HOLY INNOCENTS', SEVEN SPRINGS 



The Young People's Service League of Holy 
Innocents', Seven Springs, visited the Lenoir 
County Home Christmas, presented a program 
and gave fruits and presents to the inmates. 

The following officers have been elected for 
the year 1940: Martha Raye Barwick, President; 
Theron Jones, Vice President; Nettie Hardy, 
Secretary and Treasurer; Bertha Mae Newman, 
Thank Offering Secretary; Gerard Hardy, Coun- 
sellor; Martha Raye Barwick, Diocesan Rep- 
resentative; Gladys Elmore, Program Chairman; 
Irene Davis, Service Chairman; Kathleen Hardy, 
Social Chairman; Nathan Hardy, Membership 
Chairman. 

Sincerely, 

MARTHA RAYE BARWICK. 



FEBRUARY, 1940 



11 



ST. PAUL'S, GREENVILLE 



Several new members have joined our League, 
of which we are very proud. Our programs re- 
cently have been centered around "The Church 
and Where It Works." These programs have cre- 
ated a great deal of interest. We shall use the 
book recommended for our programs this Lent. 
We put the collection taken up during Lent in 
our League "mite box." 

MARGARET JONES, 
President Y. P. S. L., St. Paul's, Greenville. 



THE PROGRAM OF EVANGELISM 



By Rev. Jack R. Rountree 

Attention of the Churches is called again to 
the program of the Department of Evangelism 
for this year. It is a program based upon the 
need and practices of the Church from earliest 
times. There is first, the public preaching of the 
gospel, through missions in every Church ; second, 
teaching them the word of God and His place in 
the life of the Church, through group study of 
the "Half Hour" series of tracts, published by the 
Forward Movement Commission; third, a revital- 
izing of the life of the Clergy, through regular con- 
ferences for meditation, prayer and self examin- 
ation, that the priest-prophets of the Church may 
be filled with the spirit of God; and lastly, the 
training of lay leadership for direction of public 
worship, supplementing the Clergy, in leading 
the fellowship in group worship closer to God. 

Weather conditions have retarded the com- 
mencement of part of the program, and a multi- 
plicity of conflicting tasks has played its part. 
But the Lenten season is on — and the time is ripe 
for inaugurating the other parts of the program. 

It is neither too late nor difficult, to plan and 
prepare for missions in every Church in the Di- 
ocese during the Lenten season. In fact, this is 
the most propitious time. Certainly a week or ten 
days of intense spiritual worship and contempla- 
tion of the real truths inherent in the Gospel, and 
an urgent endeavor to lead people to decision is 
not too much to ask of ourselves today. The val- 
ue of our missions lies in the repeated and con- 
sistent study, during a brief period in which oth- 
er things are laid aside, and concentration of 
thought upon one supreme fact, "God, who loves 
man, is still in His world and still Lord of all." 

Certainly studying groups should be a part of 
our Lenten program, and nothing offers a better 
course for meditation and study than the "Half 



Hour Series" in which the great truths of the 
Church are logically thought through. 

With ever widening opportunities to extend 
the Kingdom of God right in our own Diocese and 
with a lack of funds by which Clergy can be sent 
into the fields, already white unto the harvest, 
trained Lay Leaders offer the means through 
which the Church might bear witness to all. 

So the Department of Evangelism is asking the 
Clergy and Churches to consider the program, 
and make their plans accordingly. 

The whole thought of the Madras Conference, 
centered about the need and facts of evangelism. 
The world is awakening to the fact that only as 
we become again evangelistic can the Church re- 
gain her place in God's plan for saving the world. 
We are not asked to save the Church ; indeed the 
Church is asked to lose herself, that again as 
Christ, She may be used of Him to save the world. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 



Whereas, God, in His infinite mercy, has seen 
fit to take unto Himself the soul of His faithful 
servant and our beloved friend and co-worker, 
Lila Morrison Adams, 

We, the Woman's Auxiliary of East Carolina, 
assembled in Annual Meeting January 25th, 
1940, wish to express our deep and abiding sor- 
row for the loss that has come to the women's 
work in this Diocese and to ourselves as individ- 
uals, and to assure her family of our love and 
sympathy. 

Lila Adams was one of the most valued women 
who has ever served in this Diocese. With a 
thorough knowledge of the work of the whole 
Church and its Program, she ever kept before us 
the broad vision of our responsibility toward the 
National Church and our opportunities for ser- 
vice in Parish, Diocese, Nation and World. Hers 
was a perfectly trained mind and a deeply devel- 
oped spiritual personality. She stood ever ready 
to share with all of her store of knowledge and 
experience. Truly the work went forward be- 
cause of her presence among us. May her mem- 
ory be a shining example. 

Be It Resolved, That this resolution be read be- 
fore the Convention, a copy sent to her family, 
and a copy printed in The Mission Herald. 
Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. E. C. CONGER, 
MISS ANNA E. LONG, 
MRS. GUY CARDWELL. 
St. James' Church, 
Wilmington, North Carolina. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE CLERGY CONFERENCE 



By Rev. Jack R. Rountree 

The third of the Clergy Conferences, inaugu- 
urated in accordance with the suggestion of the 
Department of Evangelism, was held Tuesday, 
February 6th, in St. Mary's Church, Kinston. 
Thirteen of the Clergy were present, three of 
those who had attended the previous conferences 
being prevented by illness from being there. Each 
of the conferences has been inspiring and helpful, 
and each succeeding one has shown progress in 
the development of the appreciation of the spirit- 
ual values inherent in the idea with which they 
were conceived. Truly the Clergy have experi- 
enced a deep sense of the working of the power 
of God's presence, and the realization of their 
personal need for drawing closer to God was 
deeply felt. 

Perhaps the importance of the theme tended 
to arouse that anticipation, which prepares the 
soul for self-examination and dedication to God. 
For no Clergyman can medidate upon "The Life 
of a Clergyman and his Function as a Prophet" — 
which was the theme of the day's meditation — 
and not feel a deepening sense of his own need for 
and responsibility to God. 

Holy Communion celebrated by the Rev. Worth 
Wicker, brought the minds of the clergy near to 
the heart of God. The Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Evangelism, the Rev. J. R. Rountree, 
then presented the theme of the day's medita- 
tion and called upon the Rev. John R. Tolar, of 
Fayetteville, who led the meditations. 

Mr. Tolar's meditation was one of the most 
touchingly beautiful discussions of the prophetic 
office that it has been the privilege of the writer 
to hear. He told of the development of the prophet 
from earliest times until in the Christian minis- 
try he became the voice of God, as he lived in 
daily communion with Jesus, through the power 
of the Holy Spirit. 

And the speaker insisted that the voice of the 
prophet is still needed in the land today — for 
more than ever men need to hear, "Thus saith the 
Lord, This is the way, walk ye in it." The speaker 
led the thoughts of the Clergy into the very pres- 
ence of God, until we asked ourselves, "Have we 
been true to our prophetic office ? If not, then, by 
the help of God we will be." 

Bishop Darst followed the period of meditation 
by a discussion of the life of the prophet-clergy- 
man, and in a very tender and kind appeal, be- 
sought the Clergy to live lives worthy of the 
Gospel and to refrain from any practices that 
would reflect discredit upon their holy calling. 
The Bishop led us to consider ourselves, and with 
Paul say, "but I buffet my body and bring it into 
bondage : lest by any means, after I have preached 



to others, I myself should be rejected." 

A season of directed prayer, led by the Bishop, 
brought to a focus the entire period of worship 
and meditation upon the love of God, as it is in 
Christ Jesus our Lord, and the worshippers en- 
tered into a real communion with the Spirit of 
God. 

Luncheon was had in the private dining room 
of Hotel Kinston, and the meeting adjourned at 
2:00 P. M. 

The next Conference will be held on March 
5th in Greenville, beginning with the celebra- 
tion of the Holy Communion at 10:30 o'clock. 
Every Clergyman of the Diocese should deter- 
mine to attend the March meeting. The theme: 
"The Clergyman and his Life of Prayer." 



RESOLUTION OF RESPECT TO DR. ROBERT 

BRENT DRANE, BY VESTRY OF ST. 

PAUL'S CHURCH, EDENTON 



Whereas, Almighty God in His wisdom has 
removed from our presence our long time rector 
and faithful friend the Reverend Robert Brent 
Drane, D. D., and, 

Whereas we, the Vestry of St. Paul's Parish, 
feel a distinct sense of loss at the passing of our 
spiritual guide and minister who served this par- 
ish for fifty-six years, and 

Whereas, our departed friend strove always to 
do God's bidding and by precept and example 
stood as a shining light of an abiding faith in 
God's word and by his tireless and ever faithful 
ministration to the spiritual needs of the mem- 
bers of St. Paul's Parish as well as to many oth- 
ers, was an inspiration to them to likewise strive 
to follow the teachings of Jesus Christ. 

Now, therefore, we, the Vestry of St. Paul's 
Parish, holding the memory of Robert Brent 
Drane revered and rejoicing in the belief that 
he now has reached immortal life, do hereby ex- 
press our sorrow at his passing; our sympathy 
to his family and our gratitude that this parish 
and community enjoyed the leadership of so schol- 
arly, godly and devoted a minister of Christ. 
JOHN W. GRAHAM, 
D. M. WARREN, 

Committee. 
D. M. WARREN, Secretary. 



DOUGLAS DOWDY SERVING ST. PAUL'S 
CLINTON 



Mr. Douglas Dowdy, a student of the DuBose 
School, Monteagle, Tenn., is serving St. Paul's, 
Clinton, during his vacation period. 

On one Sunday in the month, he assists the 
Rev. J. Leon Malone by holding a morning ser- 
vice at St. Gabriel's, Faison. 



FEBRUARY. 1940 



13 



REPORT OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD HOSPI- 
TAL TO THE ANNUAL CONVENTION 



For a year and a half the Good Shepherd Hos- 
pital has been carrying on the mission for which 
it was created: to bring the ministry of healing 
in larger measure to a portion of the 300,000 Ne- 
groes in this Diocese, in the name of our Lord 
and His Church. To those of us who have been 
identified with the Good Shepherd, there has been 
a wealth of grateful satisfaction that the Insti- 
tution has gotten under way so well and has met in 
such a splendid way such a large measure of the 
need for this kind of service to humanity. On 
every hand there is praise to the Church for its 
enterprise and generosity in making the hospital 
possible. The colored people show in many ways 
their appreciation of the hospital and are begin- 
ning to show some improvement in paying for the 
treatments received. During several months in 
the latter part of 1939 receipts were sufficient to 
meet current expenses. During 1939, we gave 
3,500 free days of care. If we were able to do 
this without becoming heavily involved in debt 
it was because many small donations from 
friends here at home and other parts of the coun- 
try have come in to help us stem the tide. Among 
these friends who have stood by us are branches 
of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Diocese of East 
Carolina, who not only furnished the Emergen- 
cy Ward at the Good Shepherd, but donated last 
week the receipts of their summer work for the 
Good Shepherd. Besides this we have received 
linens and books that have been timely and 
helpful. It should prove of interest just here 
that there passed through the Emergency Ward 
furnished by the Woman's Auxiliary of East 
Carolina, during the first year of operation more 
than 4,000 clinical and emergency patients, treat- 
ed there by the County Health Department. In 
addition 80 hospital emergency cases passed 
through there also, that is, people shot and cut 
and otherwise battered up, brought in by police 
and passersby. 

Our medical staff remains the same although 
Dr. Kafer has been out for several months as a 
result of an automobile accident, and Dr. Fisher 
has been confined since before Thanksgiving. 
Drs. Duffie, Wadsworth, Ashford, Mumford, 
Mann and Martin have done all the work in the 
meantime. As an indication of the stabilization 
of personnel, all nurses employed at our last re- 
port are still on the staff under the leadership of 
Miss Rebecca Hennie, who succeeded Miss Ander- 
son as superintendent in 1939. A letter signed 
by all our doctors recently, and sent to Dr. Ran- 
kin and Bishop Darst expressed their complete 
satisfaction with the operation of the hospital and 



the relations with subordinate personnel. I must 
add a word from Dr. Duffy who said to me in the 
Post Office last Sunday morning: "The Good 
Shepherd Hospital is doing a fine piece of work. 
We have saved the lives of many who otherwise 
would have died but for the Good Shepherd." 
Dr. McGeachy told the County Commissioners 
recently, "The Good Shepherd Hospital is beauti- 
fully operated and deserves all the encouragement 
that can be given it." 

An outstanding service this year was the tu- 
berculosis clinic in which the lungs of several 
hundred public school children were X-rayed. 

The writer still rejoices in the fine helpfulness 
of Mr. Noe, whose wisdom and foresight are in- 
valuable, and whose direction of the policy and 
official relations of the hospital has been a great 
source of strength. I thank Mr. Noe and also Mr. 
Williams, whose chairmanship of our administra- 
tive board has assured thorough understanding 
and harmony and clarity of planning and opera- 
tions. 

Behind us all has been the sympathetic en- 
couragement of our Bishop whose prayers and 
good wishes have made us feel that we just had 
to get on somehow. 

I invite and invoke your aid in helping to make 
firm and durable the foundations of this Chris- 
tian institution which in the name of our Lord 
and this Church seeks to bring health to the thou- 
sands who in so many ways serve our people in 
homes, and fields and shops ; for they constitute 
a challenge at our very doors let our attitude be 
what it may on the challenge of fields abroad. 
These are Lazarus at the door with sore and griev- 
ous wounds ; and it is true, that crumbs that fall 
from rich men's tables will heal them, body, soul 
and spirit. Crumbs, the multiplied small gifts of 
"Friends of the Good Shepherd Hospital," can 
possibly provide the needed deficiency that will 
mean success. I invoke your continued interest 
and friendship. 

The following is a report of our first year's work 
with patients that came to us from Craven, Car- 
teret, Beaufort, Pamlico, Jones, Onslow, Hyde, 
Pitt and Lenoir ocunties: 

Report of the First Year's Work at the Good 

Shepherd Hospital, New Bern, N. C. 

July 1, 1938 to June 30, 1939 

Passed through clinics (venereal, mater- 
nity, etc.) :..„. 4,000 

Ward patients 416 

Full pay ..._ 77 

Part pay 109 

Welfare (Craven County) 68 

Welfare (Other Counties) 12 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Emergency (Hospital) 80 

Free 70 

Total 416 

Note: The 70 free patients cost the hospital 
$2,800, donated by "Friends of the Good Shepherd 
Hospital". 

White and colored doctors work side by side 
in a by-racial set-up. Although there are several 
operations every week, and on some days as many 
as four, we have not lost a major operation since 
last February. This is an unusual record. 

Elizabeth is a baby who was brought in with 
a condition suggesting deliberate starving. She 
had a dehydrated body and was sub-human in 
appearance. She was kept at the hospital for 
months, completely returned to normal health, 
and was baptized at St. Cyprian's last Spring. 
We always have some such child at the hospital. 
"Punkie" was cured of spinal meningitis and 
pneumonia. When she returned home, no one 
could fix her food or clothing to suit her. 

Rural mothers, usually delivered by midwives, 
are learning to use the hospital maternity ward. 



THE SECRET 



Will the "day of ashes" and the season of Lent 
mean anything real to us? It is everlastingly 
true that the way to the "pearl of great price" 
is penitence. Perhaps we would like to repent 
in a deep passionate way but cannot. We force 
ourselves, maybe, to the formal duty, better than 
nothing, but not satisfactory. Maybe we cannot 
do even this; sin itself has become unreal to us 
as to the world in such large degree today. Is 
there a secret of repentence ? 

Job could not repent; miserable and rebellious 
the way to the "pearl" was blocked for him. His 
friends came to condole with him. They told him 
that his sufferings were the result of his sins. 
He contemptuously repudiated them and their 
theology. Then they compared him to others and 
this infuriated him. He said, probably correctly, 
"I am not inferior to you". Once more they ex- 
plained to him all they knew about God and the 
divine requirements. "Happy is the man", they 
said to him, "whom God correcteth, therefore 
despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty". 
Job indignantly replied, "No doubt but you are 
the people and wisdom shall die with you . . . yea, 
who knoweth not such things as these?" The 
friends gave up and departed because Job "was 
righteous in his own eyes". 

Another person, Elihu, came to see him seeking 
to prove that his misfortunes were a warning 



from God. Job did not even deign to answer 
Elihu. 

Now a great change comes in the story. The 
afflicted man has a real experience. There arises 
a great storm and Job hears the voice of God 
Himself speaking out of the wind. He comes now 
into direct contact with God, in all His omnipo- 
tence, and omnipresence. Through this experi- 
ence the veil of the other world is drawn aside 
and he sees God face to face. God was no longer 
an abstraction but a living Personality before 
Whom he stood. Without any argument an utter 
change of attitude came and he says, "I have 
heard of Thee by the hearing of the ear ; but now 
mine eye seeth Thee. Wherefore I abhor myself 
and repent in dust and ashes". Job's pride was 
only hardened by the talk of his friends, the 
vision of God melted his heart. In seeing God 
he saw himself. When he looked from himself to 
God the new sight awoke in him a knowledge of 
himself which all his self-deception had been un- 
able to produce. The divine response to his re- 
pentance was absolution. As to St. Francis and 
many another came the words: "Fear not, my 
son, thy sins are forgiven thee". 

Lent will fail of its purpose if it gives us not a 
fresh vision of God. Repentance will follow this. 
The way to the "pearl of great price" will be 
opened. For us the Vision is in Christ. "He 
that hath seen me hath seen the Father." Lent 
is the opportunity. "Jesus of Nazareth passeth 
by." — From Bishop's Department of "The Dio- 
cese", South Carolina. 



A TRIBUTE 



Miss Emily Bridgers, entered into life eternal, 
from her home in Wilmington, North Carolina, 
January 16, 1940. 

As her pastor for twenty-seven years I have 
been given the high privilege of paying this brief 
tribute to her memory. Her's were the graces 
of all true sainthood — simplicity, humility, loyal- 
ty and generosity. 

Endowed with ample means she chose a life of 
cloistered simplicity, and by her self-denying gen- 
erosity made easier the burdens of others, as a 
good steward of God's bounty. Rarely, if ever 
have I known one so sensitive to the needs of oth- 
ers in every relationship of Church and society. 
The example she has left us is indeed the example 
of the Master whom she served, that we might 
follow with her in His steps. 

May she rest in peace, and may light perpetual 
shine upon her. 

WILLIAM H. MILTON 



FEBRUARY, 1940 



15 



THE BISHOP'S PARISH 



Rev. J. Leon Malone, Priest in Charge, 
R. F. D. 3, Wilmington, N. C. 



We have a list of more than a hundred people 
who are Episcopalians, living in communities in 
our Diocese where there are no regular Services 
of our Church held. We are calling this group 
"The Bishop's Parish". We plan to keep in touch 
with them and minister to them in whatever way 
we can. 

A letter was sent to each home represented on 
February 1st, with an Enrollment Blank enclosed. 
The response to these letters has been gratifying. 
Many people have expressed their interest and 
appreciation. A special Lenten letter was sent 
at the beginning of Lent with a Self Denial Offer- 
ing Envelope enclosed, and arrangements were 
made for a copy of the February number of 
FORTH (formerly Spirit of Missions) to be sent 
to each home. 



The Enrollment Blank asks if the members 
would like to have literature, books, etc. on the 
Church, and instructions by mail for the children. 
We have a goodly number of requests for this 
service. The Church Periodical Club offers its 
cooperation and assistance. 

The Editor of the MISSION HERALD has 
kindly arranged to send the paper to each of these 
homes, and has agreed to let us have a column 
for special messages to them each month. 

We invite the Clergy and Church people to go 
in the name of the Church to call on any of these 
people whenever you can. The following mem- 
bers have replied to the letters and may be found 
at the address given here. 

Mrs. Annie Price, Jacksonville ; Mrs. James P. 
Walton, Carolina Beach; Miss Mary West Cro- 
martie and Miss Elizabeth Robinson, Elizabeth- 
town; Mrs. Stephen Askew, Oriental; Mrs. J. N. 
Dawson, Bolton; Mrs. Mary L. Brooks, Alliance; 
Mrs. W. M. Swanson, Mrs. C. R. Dilliard and Miss 
Mary Lyman, Penderlea; and Mrs. George Dick- 
erson, Rowland. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 
GENERAL CHURCH WORK, JANUARY !, 19 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1940 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 

Paid 

to 

Feb. 21 

1940 



Paid 
to 
Feb. 21 
1940 



"Irishes 

Beaufort. °>t. Paul's $ 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills. Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

Lumberton, Trinity _ 

New Bern, Christ Church 

_;ed Springs, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Soupthport, St. Philip's 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's ... 

Whiteville, Grace Church 

Wiimmgton, Good Shepherd 

Wilmington, St. James' 1,602.15 

Wilmington, St. John's 16S.66 

Wilmington, St Paul's 50.00 



100.00 

77.75 



50.00 
138.00 



16.00 



45.38 



Organized Minions 

Burgaw. St. Mary's 

Campbellton, St. Philip-Apostle 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

North West, All Soul's 

Pikeville, St. George's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 



Unorganized Missions 

Brunswick. St. Andrews' .... 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 
Tar Landing 



4.14 



Total $ 2.250.08 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



Parishes 

Aurora, noly Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City. Christ Church 

Faimville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville St. Mary's 

Greenville, St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Jessama, Zion 

i_ake Landing, St. George's 

Flymouth, Grace Church 

Roper, St. Luke's 

Washington, St. Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



400.00 
49.50 



69.50 



7.00 
333.34 

50.00 



Windsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton. St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 

Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfrpesboro. St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Missions 

Avoca, Holy Innocents 

Parochial Missions 

Creswell, Galilee Mission .. 



10.00 



10.00 
25.00 



25.00 



Total ; $ 9?9- 34 



Parishes 

/ayetteville, St. Joseph's 

New Bern St. Cyprian's 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 

Organized Missions 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 

Laenton. St. John-Evangelist 

Elizabeth City, St. Philin's 

GoMsboro, St. Andrew's 

Xinston, St. Aug'istine's 

Washington, St. Paul's 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 

Unorganized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Farmville, St. Timothy's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission 



2.00 



3.50 



Total $ 



5.50 



Grand Total $ 3.234.92 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



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SCHOOL 

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Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: { 

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ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
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A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
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Teacher Training for State High School Teacners' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar j 

ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. j 



RECTOR 



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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
Wilmington, N. C. 



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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 

of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 

Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 

Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 

Wilmington, N. C. 






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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter 
continue her education in a Church school. 

MRS. ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, A. M. 
President 

Saint Mary's offers the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades 
of High School and 2 years College work. All acade- 
mic courses fully accredited by Southern Association. 
General charge ?70<» including- iu lion 1n Art, Expres 
sion, Home Economics, Music. 

Gym and Field sports. Horseback Riding, Goif, 
Tennis, 20 acre campus and Indoor Tiled Pool. 

Catalogue and Book of Views 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



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WE WOULD BE BUILDINCx 

"We would be building; temples still undone 

O'er crumbling walls their crosses scarcely lift 
Waiting til love can raise the broken stone, 
And hearts creative bridge the human rift. 
We would be building. Master, let thy plan 
Reveal the life that God would give to man. 

Teach us to build. Upon the solid rock 

We set the dream that hardens into deed. 
Ribbed with the steel that time and change doth mock, 
The unfailing purpose of our noblest creed. 
Teach us to build. Master, lend us sight 
To see the towers gleaming in the light. 

O keep us building, Master. May our hands 

Ne'er falter when the dream is in our hearts. 
When to our ears there come divine commands 
And all the pride of sinful will departs. 

We build with Thee. grant enduring worth 
Until the heavenly kingdom comes on earth." 

This poem of Purd E. Dietz has been set to music 
by Finland's great composer, Jean Sibelius. 



o 



\J 



MARCH 




1940 




A 



h— 1 



V 




THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 

Single Copies 1 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Editor 

REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 

Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnish ed on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilming ton, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 



EDITORIAL 



By Rev. Jack R. Rountree 

The Gospel is a story of love — divine love reach- 
ing down in an effort to woo man from his self- 
centeredness into a deep love for his Father God, 
as He is revealed in the Savior, and to feel with 
God the pain of the world. Feel it so keenly that 
our hearts burn within us, and we too feel a deep- 
ening love for man that impels us to seek to win 
him for God. 

Through it all is divine love actively express- 
ing itself in contacts with the world of men and 
women. As love is the only way that man -can 
ever be influenced to turn from his selfishness 
and live unselfishly, God through His Son Jesus 
Christ loved so deeply that he endured the cross 
and triumphed. 

But we do not find that the present-day servants 
of God, the clergy, fully realize the implications 
of being born from above with the divine love 
flowing into their hearts. There is a tendency 
among many to be fussy and unloving; a feeling 
that their task is to criticise and find fault with 
everything — the people who are present at a ser- 
vice have to stand the abuse, or criticism, at least, 
for those who are not present. And the worship- 
per goes away feeling that he has been defrauded 
of his right to feel himself in the presence of God. 

It is essential that we preach the truth — but 
we must preach it in love. The gospel is a draw- 
ing power and not a lash. He who uses a lash de- 



feats the purpose of God in calling him into the- 
ministry — and he drives souls from the kingdom. 
And all this he may do, thinking that he is doing 
God a service. But it is a mistaken conception 
and the Church will never draw souls into the fel- 
lowship of God through any such manner. 

People must be loved into the kingdom of God, 
into the Church. Fussiness defeats love. Cler- 
gy and laity alike must learn to love God — man — 
aye and the sinner. 

If the Diocese of East Carolina is to be used of 
Cod to win men for Christ, then we must stop 
fussing, exploiting our egotistic opinions, and feel 
our way into the very heart of all people by loving 
them, even as He loves them. 

Jesus said, "I give you a new command, to love 
one another — as I have loved you, you are to love 
one another. By this everyone will recognize that 
you are my disciples, if you have love one for an- 
other." 



DO YOU KNOW? 



That in some of the parishes and missions there 
are consecrated women, who take as their work, 
the placing of the Mission Herald in the homes 
of their people and do it regularly and consistent- 
ly each year without charge to the paper. For 
many years Miss Marian F. Skinner of St. Paul's, 
Edenton secured new subscriptions and looked 
after the renewals with the result that many 
families in the parish take the paper at the reg- 
ular subscription price of one dollar a year. Miss 
Skinner did not wait to be reminded of expiration 
dates. She kept a list of the subscribers and 
called on them regularly at the proper time for 
the renewals. When she had to give up this work 
during the past year on account of the condition 
of her health, she secured Miss Emily W. Howard 
to carry on the work and notified the Mission Her- 
ald. Miss Howard has already sent in a number of 
renewals and seems to find joy in this work. 

If we had a person in each parish and mission 
who would help us in this way, any problem that 
the Mission Herald might have would be solved. 
We are confident that there is a person in each 
parish and mission who would like to do this, 
but we do not know them. We hope that you will 
write us, if you would like to help in this work 
that can mean so much to the whole work of the 
Church. The Mission Herald is the official or<ran 
of the Diocese and is used to give information a- 
bout our work to the people of the Diocese. It 
is one important way "to inform the mind and a- 
waken the conscience." 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C, MARCH, 1940 



NUMBER 3 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



My last letter to our diocesan family was writ- 
ten on February fourteenth following my return 
from my annual visit to Chapel Hill. 

On Thursday, February fifteenth, I attended a 
special conference on the Diocesan Debt at St. 
Paul's Parish House, Greenville, at which time 
the Bishop's Memorial Anniversary Fund Com- 
mittee was abolished and a new Diocesan Debt 
Committee was created. After full and intelli- 
gent discussion of the whole matter by the fine 
group of clergy and laity present, it was moved 
that I appoint a committee of laymen to cooper- 
ate with the Department of Finance in working 
out plans for the retirement of the debt at an ear- 
ly date. The debt, while not large, is proving very 
burdensome and I earnestly hope that we may 
have it out of the way by Whitsunday so that we 
may go forward without strain to the accomplish- 
ment of the task committed to our hands. I had 
fondly hoped that it might be paid off before my 
twenty-fifth anniversary, as this was, of course, 
the purpose of those who presented the matter 
on the occasion of my twentieth anniversary in 
Beaufort in 1935. There is still time to do this fine 
thing by Whitsunday, and in the name of the 
Diocese and in my own name I urge that it be 
done. 

On Sunday, February eighteenth at 11.00 A. M., 
I preached and confirmed twelve persons present- 
ed by the Rev. John C. Grainger in St. Stephen's 
Church, Goldsboro. At 2:00 P. M., I met with 
the Executive Committee of the Diocesan Y. P. 
S. L., in St. Stephen's Parish House. At 3:30 P. 
M., I preached and confirmed five persons pre- 
sented by the Rev. Roger E. Bunn, in St. Andrew's 
Church, Goldsboro. 

On Wednesday night, February twenty-first, 
I preached at the Lenten Community Service in 
Grace Church, Charleston, S. C. 

On Thursday night (Washington's Birthday), 
I made an address at the Brotherhood Dinner of 
the Conference of Christians and Jews in Wil- 
mington. 

On Sunday, February twenty-fifth, I preached 
the sermon on the occasion of the One Hundredth 
.Anniversary of the Parish, in Robert E. Lee Me- 
morial Church, Lexington, Virginia. One of our 
East Carolina boys, the Rev. Thomas H. Wright, 



is the able and beloved Rector of this parish. 

On Tuesday, the twenty-seventh at 8:00 P. M., 
I preached at a special Lenten service in Christ 
Church, Roanoke, Virginia. 

On Sunday morning, March third, I preached 
and confirmed one person, presented by the Rev. 
Sidney E. Matthews, in the Church of the Holy 
Cross, Aurora. In the afternoon I preached in 
St. John's Church, Bonnerton. At night I preach- 
ed and confirmed one person presented by the Rev. 
John B. Brown in St. Jude's Church, Aurora. 

On Tuesday, the fifth at 4:30 P. M., I assisted 
in a funeral in St. James' Church, Wilmington. 

On Friday, the eighth, I attended a meeting of 
the Diocesan Department of Finance in Wilming- 
ton. 

On Sunday, the tenth, at 11 :00 A. M., I preached 
and confirmed ten persons presented by the Rev. 
Stephen Gardner in St. Peter's Church, Washing- 
ton. 

From the eleventh through the fifteenth, I 
preached at the Lenten Noon Day services in Nor- 
folk, Virginia. 

On Palm Sunday, the seventeenth, at 11:00 A. 
M., I preached and confirmed twelve persons pre- 
sented by the Rev. Mortimer Glover in St. James' 
Church, Wilmington. On the night of Palm Sun- 
day I preached and confirmed ten persons present- 
ed by the Rev. E. W. Halleck in St. John's Church, 
Wilmington. 

In my next letter I shall hope to tell you of 
my Holy Week and Easter services. 

With the earnest prayer that we may "rise to 
newness of life" on Easter Day, I am, 
Faithfully and affectionately, 
Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



CALABASH RADIATES 



Splendid progress is being made in the work 
at Calabash. A compliment to the work is found 
in the fact that the people in the nearby commu- 
nity of Thomasboro plan to erect a building to be 
used for services, Sunday School and community 
recreation. Mr. Cornelius Thomas, an Episco- 
palian, county representative from Brunswick, is 
the leader in the movement. Material and labor 
for practically all the needs of this building have 
been promised by the community. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY NEWS 



April Calendar 

Feast of Annunciation 1 

St. Mark 25 

Many Auxiliary women who could not attend 
the Annual Meeting in Wilmington will have an 
opportunity to attend their District Meeting. 
Bring with you the best piece of work you have 
done in your Auxiliary. 

The Good Friday offering is the only means 
of support for the Rev. C. T. Bridgeman, who is 
our only Clergyman in Palestine. 

The blessed Easter season gives us another op- 
portunity to express our thankfulness in the form 
of our Easter offering. 

The Spring United Thank offering will be pre- 
sented Sunday, the 28th of April, or as near this 
date as possible. Emphasize the number of giv- 
ers rather than the amount given. 



ECHOES FROM KANUGA 



Last summer it was my great privilege to attend 
the Adult Conference at Kanuga. I wish every 
member of the Auxiliary and every young per- 
son in the Diocese might have the same opportu- 
nity. It is a place on a mountain top where one 
may go for refreshment of mind, body and spir- 
it ; where one may mingle with consecrated men 
and women from all parts of the country, and be- 
come so thrilled over the religious program of the 
Church that he must go out and proclaim the 
love of Christ to the world. It is an open door 
through which a perpetual light shines to lead us 
on to greater heights in His name. 

ELIZABETH NOE. (Mrs. A. C. D.) 

In speaking of Kanuga one who loves it and is 
deeply grateful for the fullness of life gained 
there, has to conciously use restraint to keep a 
flow of language, especially adjectives from snow- 
ing under the live impression one wishes to make. 
It might be well to simply list the advantages 
gained: 

Stimulation for real spiritual growth. 

The strength and lift of true Christian fellow- 
ship. 

A wide personal acquaintance with active lead- 
ers and workers in the Church and a knowledge 
of their work. 

An awakening and opening of the mind which 



brings and keeps it alive and colors all life as 
well as gives a greater capacity for work. 

Very worthwhile friendships. 

The feeling that you have a contribution to of- 
fer on returning to your Parish- 

A heart full of thanksgiving which feelingly sug- 
gests the old hymn: 

Blest be the tie that binds 
Our hearts in Jesus' love, 
The fellowship of kindred minds, 
Is like to that above. 

CARY MACRAE, (Mrs. Donald) 

Just as Christ took His disciples and went 
apart to guide them and teach them, so the 
Church has established a retreat where all Church 
people may live together and learn of Him. 

At Kanuga, all are real disciples of the Master 
in the true meaning of the word, for, there we 
are "followers" and "learners" of Him. One can- 
not estimate the blessings received from the 
courses of study offered for every age group, and 
on every subject, which will aid in the spiritual 
development of an individual. Courses on the 
Bible, the Prayer Book, Personal Religious Liv- 
ing, the Woman's Auxiliary, the Young People 
and many others. 

At the close of each day as the twilight ser- 
vice is held one cannot help but think of the 
words of the hymn: 

"Lord, it is good for us to be 

High on the mountain here with thee; 
***** 

Till we too change from grace to grace 
Gazing on that transfigured face." 

MARY OWEN SUTHERLAND. 

Witnessing For Kanuga 

In the summer of 1939 Kanuga became a real- 
ity to me. For several years I numbered Kanu- 
ga fans among my friends and to be perfectly 
frank was bored stiff by their ceaseless ravings 
of Kanuga this and Kanuga that. I am a Kanuga 
fan myself now and instead of boredom, I radiate 
enthusiasm whenever the subject is brought up. 
If you want to feel yourself growing in grace 
and the knowledge of Christian fellowship, go to 
Kanuga. If you want to feel yourself a part of 
the great army of Christian soldiers — go to Ka- 
nuga. If you want to share in the building of 
Christ's Kingdom on earth — go to Kanuga, for 
there you are taught and led into the ways of 
righteousness and truth. It is indeed good to be 
on this Holy Mount. 

What is there left for me to sav about Kanu- 



MARCH, 1940 



ga? I wrote to the East Carolina women who 
were there last summer asking each one to 
write a paragraph about Kanuga. I have read 
what each one wrote. I could write what any 
one of these wrote (not so well though) and it 
would express my feelings. Do wish I had writ- 
ten mine first so I would not have the feeling I am 
copying. I will say this. If you want a vacation 
that will lift you up physically, mentally and 
spiritually, go to Kanuga. It will change your 
point of view. Instead of thinking about your 
own Parish as the Church, you will begin to see 
the Church in its entirety, with its tentacles reach- 
ing out into the whole world, bringing all peoples 
in closer touch with Christ- 

SARAH ELIZABETH DARDEN. 



RESOLUTION AND LETTER 
OF APPRECIATION 



CHRIST CHURCH, ELIZABETH CITY 



The Woman's Auxiliary of Christ Church, 
Elizabeth City, under the capable leadership of 
its new President, Mrs. A. B. Houtz, has been re- 
organized according to the approved organiza- 
tion plan. It is active in the Five Fields of Ser- 
vice and has Chairmen of all departments, each 
functioning. We were fortunate to have Mrs. 
Rena H. Walker of Washington with us on March 
2nd. Mrs. Walker brought us a message of en- 
couragement and a challenge to go forward to 
greater things for Christ and His Church. 

MRS. G. F. HILL. 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS FOR APRIL 



April 7 St. John's Church, Fayetteville, 11:00 
A. M. 
St. Joseph's Church, Fayetteville, af- 
ternoon. 
St. Philip's Church, Campbellton, 8:00 
P. M. 
April 14 Grace Church, Plymouth, 11:00 A. M. 

St. Luke's Church, Roper, 8:00 P. M. 
April 21 Christ Church, New Bern, 11:00 A. M. 
St. Cyprian's Church, New Bern, 8:00 
P. M. 
April 28 Christ Church, Elizabeth City, 11:00 
A. M. 
Edenton Convocation, Y. P. S. L., Eliza- 
beth City, 2:00 P. M. 
St. Philip's Church, Elizabeth City, 
8:00 P. M. 



The Woman's Auxiliary, in the Diocese of East 
Carolina, assembled in Annual Convention in 
Wilmington, N. C, January 24 - 25, 1940, offered 
the following resolution: 

We, the members of the Woman's Auxiliary to 
the National Council in the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina here assembled, having heard of the resigna- 
tion of Miss Grace Lindley, Executive Secretary 
of the Woman's Auxiliary to the National Coun- 
cil, wish to express to her our love and deepest ap- 
appreciation for what her consecrated life and 
example have meant to individuals, to the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary, to the National Council, and to 
the Church throughout the world. 

We feel that her work will continue to be a God- 
given contribution in every contact with her fel- 
lowman. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. E. C. CONGER, 
MISS HENNIE E. LONG 
MRS. GUY CARDWELL, 
Committee. 

The following letter of appreciation is from Miss 
Lindley to Miss Hennie E. Long, Secretary to the 
Annual Convention of the Woman's Auxiliary in 
the Diocese of East Carolina: 



"Miss Hennie E. 
Box 35, 
Greenville, N. C. 



Long, 



My Dear Miss Long: 

"It would be impossible for me to find words 
in which to thank you and the members of the 
Woman's Auxiliary in the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina for the resolution passed on January 25th. A 
resolution from any branch of the Auxiliary would 
mean a great deal to any one of course, but for 
so many years I have especially loved and admired 
the Diocese of East Carolina so much that your 
sending me such a message means a great deal. 
I am especially grateful that you sent your love 
to me. I certainly send mine to the women of 
the Diocese of East Carolina, and I shall always 
treasure your message. 

Thanking you too for your own letter. That 
means a great deal, also, I am, 
Faithfully yours, 

GRACE LINDLEY, 
Executive Secretary. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, EDENTON 



By the Rev. C. A. Ashby 

In Lent our young people have their own ser- 
vice every Wednesday afternoon. We adopt a 
slogan for the season, hoping that the endeavor 
during Lent may stay with us. Last Lent it was 
"Be Polite" ; this, "Do Not Grumble or Com- 
plain". The choir is exceedingly good. Among 
these young folk is represented, I think, the ten- 
or, falsetto, mezzo-soprano, yodle, chirp, quaver, 
bass, lilt, magliloquent, tremolo, bravura, tingle, 
cadenza, flat, gamut and such. 

At each we have two speakers with assigned 
subjects. Wednesday, February 28th, the sub- 
ject was, Tell of Bishop Darst. Caroline Elliott 
and Logan Elliott (no kin so far as I know) were 
the preachers. I think their presentation of our 
Bishop may be worthy of a place in The Mission 
Herald, and so send in. Both tell of the devotion 
in which Bishop Darst is held. To quote Holmes 
freely and with slight change, "Not a better man 
is found by the crier on his rounds through town," 
or the country or foreign parts. 



BISHOP DARST 



Our Episcopal Church got a slow start in North 
Carolina, for fifty years we did not have a Priest 
or Altar. 

England sent over Rev. John Blair. From then 
on our Church began to grow. Bishop Charles 
Pettigrew was the first Bishop to be elected, but 
was too ill to go to Philadelphia to be consecrated 
to the office. Bishop Darst was born in 1875, in 
Virginia. He took his Academic degree from the 
Roanoke College in 1899, his Theological degree 
from the Seminary at Alexandria in 1902, where 
one of his class mates, Rt. Rev. William A. Brown, 
was elected Bishop of Southern Virginia. 

Bishop Darst served many Churches in Vir- 
ginia, and while serving St. James' Church in 
Richmond, Va., in October, 1914, he was elected 
Bishop of the Eastern Diocese of North Caroli- 
na, to succeed the late and much beloved Bishop 
Robert Strange. He was consecrated to this high 
office in St. James' Church in Wilmington, Janu- 
ary 6, 1915. 

In addition to his other duties for his Church, he 
was chosen Acting Chairman of the National Com- 
mission on Evangelism of the Episcopal Church 
for nine years, and in 1926 he personally directed 
the Bishops' Crusade, a Nation-wide campaign 
in which services were held throughout the land. 
For three years he served as President of the 



Province of Sewanee, embracing all territory south 
of Virginia and east of the Mississippi. He also 
is trustee of many colleges, and when he writes 
to a Pi Kappa Alpha he just signs his letters 
"Yours fraternally". 

Bishop Darst is one of the most beloved men 
and is loved by all who contact him. 

When he comes to our Church to hold services 
the Church is always filled to its capacity by the 
members of all denominations. 

CAROLINE ELLIOTT. 



MY SUBJECT IS BISHOP DARST 



Our Bishop of East Carolina is named Thomas 
Campbell Darst. He became our Bishop twenty- 
five years ago, having been consecrated on Janu- 
ary 6th, 1915, on the Feast of the Epiphany. He 
was nominated by our own Rector, Rev. C. A. 
Ashby. 

Bishop Darst is a Virginian by birth, and was 
Rector of St. James' in Richmond when he was 
elected Bishop of East Carolina. He thought at 
that time that he could not take such a responsi- 
bility, as much as he appreciated the honor. But 
when he began receiving letters assuring him of 
the Diocese support in this great work, he felt 
it would be staging a fight against God's purpose 
not to accept it. After making this decision he 
says he has always been profoundly thankful 
that he has had the privilege of serving God in 
this great field. His consecration service took 
place in St. James' Church, Wilmington, N. C. 

Bishop Darst led the Bishop's Crusade in 1926. 
He believed it was the time for a great spiritual 
awakening and to bring back indifferent souls 
to their Church. 

Every year Bishop Darst finds time to speak 
at the Noon Hour Services sometime during the 
Lenten season in New York and Philadelphia. I 
am sure it is a pleasure these cities look forward 
to. 

Mr. George B. Elliott says Bishop Darst defines 
St. Paul's definition of charity more than any 
man he knows. He has love for his fellowmen. 
Charity dominates his personality. He is kind, 
he is a friend to man, we love him for what he 
is and for what he does in the name of Jesus 
Christ our Lord. 

LOGAN ELLIOTT. 



ADVERTISEMENT 

Competent lady wishes to care for children or 
patients by the hour. References. 

Phone 2202-R, Wilmington. 



MARCH, 1940 



THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL OF THE DIOCESE 
AND ITS DEPARTMENTS 



Executive Council 

Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Rev. W. R. 
Noe, Members Ex-officio. 

For one year: Rev. Mortimer Glover, Wil- 
mington, N. C. ; Rev. Alexander Miller, Wilming- 
ton, N. C. ; Mr. W. B. Campbell, Wilmington, N. C. ; 
Mr. C. R. Wheatley, Beaufort, N. C; Mrs. Louis 
J. Poisson, Wilmington, N. C. 

For two years: Rev. E. F. Moseley, Kinston, 
N. C. ; Rev. J. R. Rountree, Kinston, N. C. ; Major 
J. S. Huske, Fayetteville, N. C. ; Mr. George B. El- 
liott, Wilmington, N. C. ; Mrs. W. 0. S. Sutherland, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

For three years : Rev. C. E. Williams, New Bern, 
N. C. ; Rev. John R. Tolar, Fayetteville, N. C. ; Mr. 
W. G. Gaither, Elizabeth City, N. C; Mr. J. A. 
Moore, Edenton, N. C; and Mrs. H. G. Walker, 
Washington, N. C. 

Department of Missions and Church Extension 

Mr. George B. Elliott, Chairman, Wilmington, 
N. C. ; Rev. Mortimer Glover, Wilmington, N. C. ; 
Rev. E. F. Moseley, Kinston, N. C; Rev. Alex- 
ander Miller, Wilmington, N. C; Mr. W. A. 
Townes, Wilmington, N. C. ; Rev. W. R. Noe, Wil- 
mington, N. C. ; Mrs. Louis J. Poisson, Wilming- 
ton, N. C; Mrs. W. 0. S. Sutherland, Wilming- 
ton, N. C. 

Associate Members: Mrs. Victor Shelburne, 
Washington, N. C; Mr. S. B. Downing, Roper, 
N. C. 

Department of Christian Education 

Rev. E. F. Moseley, Chairman, Kinston, N. C. ; 
Rev. Mortimer Glover, Leadership Training; Rev. 
J. R. Rountree, Evangelism. 

Associate Members: Rev. W. Tate Young, 
Church School Curriculum; Rev. J. Leon Malone, 
For the Isolated; Mrs. W. R. Noe, Special Offer- 
ings ; Mr. E. 0. Rehm, Young People ; Mrs. Donald 
MacRae, Woman's Auxiliary; Mrs. A. T. St. 
Amand, Registrar. 

Department of Christian Social Relations 

Rev. Mortimer Glover, Chairman, Wilmngton, 
N. C. ; Rev. C. E. Williams, New Bern, N. C. ; Rev. 
E. F. Moseley, Kinston, N. C. ; Rev. J. Leon Malone 
R. F. D. 3, Wilmington, N. C; Mr. C. R. Wheatly, 
Beaufort, N. C. ; Rev. W. R. Noe, Wilmington, N. 
C. ; Rev. John R. Tolar, Fayetteville, N. C. ; Mrs. 
H. G. Walker, Washington, N. C; Major J. S. 
Huske, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Associate Members : Rev. Oscar E. Holder, Wil- 
mington, N. C; Mrs. J. E. F. Hicks, Goldsboro, 
N. C. 



Department of Finance 

Rev. John R. Tolar, Chairman, Fayetteville, 
N. C; Mr. George B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C; 
Mr. W. G. Gaither, Elizabeth City, N. C; Major 
J. S. Huske, Fayetteville, N C. ; Mr. J. A. Moore, 
Edenton, N. C; Mr. T. F. Darden, Wilmington, 
N. C; Mr. W. B. Campbell, Wilmington, N. C; 
Rev. Alexander Miller, Wilmington, N. C. ; Rev. 
E. F. Moseley, Kinston, N. C. ; Mrs. Louis J. Pois- 
son, Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Members: Mr. D. M. Warren, Eden- 
ton, N. C. ; Mr. McC. B. Wilson, Wilmington, N. C. 

Department of Promotion 

Rev. Alexander Miller, Chairman, Wilmington, 
N. C; Rev. John W. Hardy, Williamston, N. C; 
Rev. John R. Tolar, Fayetteville, N. C. ; Mrs. W. 
0. S. Sutherland, Wilmington, N. C; Rev. W. 
R. Noe, Wilmington, N. C. ; Mr. W. F. Joyner, 
Goldsboro, N. C. 

Associate Members: Mrs. Charles F. Green, 
Wilmington, N. C. ; Rev. R. I. Johnson, New Bern, 
N. C. 

Department of Evangelism 

Rev. J. R. Rountree, Chairman, Kinston, N. C; 
Rev. Mortimer Glover, Wilmington, N. C.J Rev. 
E. F. Moseley, Kinston, N. C. ; Rev. W. Tate Young, 
Fayetteville, N. C. ; Rev. R. I. Johnson, New Bern, 
N. C; Mrs. L. J. Poisson, Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Members: Rev. E. W. Halleck, Wil- 
mington, N. C; Mrs. Victor Shelburne, Washing- 
ton, N. C. 



IMPROVEMENT IN CONDITION OF REV. 
ALEXANDER MILLER 



We are glad to be able to report improvement 
in the condition of Rev. Alexander Miller, Rector 
of St. Paul's, Wilmington. Mr. Miller has been 
sick for several months, but it is hoped that he 
will soon be able to take up his regular duties in 
the Parish. 



ST. PETER'S, SUNBURY 



We understand that work has started on the 
new Church at Sunbury. 

It was one year ago this month that the Church 
at Sunbury was practically destroyed by a tor- 
nado. 

We want to congratulate the people on the 
progress they have made in securing the funds 
for the new building. 



THE MTSSTON HERALD 



THE BISHOP'S PARISH 



Rev. J. Leon Malone, Priest in Charge, 
R. F. D. 3, Wilmington, N. C. 



LEE MEMORIAL PARISH IN LEXINGTON, 
VIRGINIA, CELEBRATES CENTENNIAL 



Dear Members: 

Since The Mission Herald was published last 
month, we have received enrollment blanks from 
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert T. Bame, Carolina Beach, 
N. C, Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Jordan, Mt. Olive, N. 
C, Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Browder, Wallace, N. C. 
We have learned of a number of other scattered 
members of our Church, so that we have added 
a dozen new names to our mailing list. This 
issue of The Mission Herald will be sent to them. 

There are still a number of you who have not 
sent in your enrollment blanks, and we know 
you intend to. May we have these soon? We 
cannot continue to carry names of those who 
make no response. Names and addresses will be 
published here as the enrollments come in. 

May I take this means of reminding you of 
the opportunity to send your Self Denial Lenten 
and your Easter Offering for Missions. I plan 
to send a report of the offerings to every person 
taking part in it, and will publish the total amount 
in this letter next month. Let's make a good rec- 
ord for the Bishop's Parish in this first offering 
of its kind. 

Please let me know of any new changes of ad- 
dresses, and of any new members moving into 
your community. 

Best wishes for a happy Easter, 
Yours very truly, 
J. LEON MALONE. 



NEW PARISH HOUSE AT CALABASH 



Work has begun recently on a parish house 
for St. Andrew's (Inland Waterway) Mission at 
Calabash. It is to be twenty by thirty feet and 
will have living quarters for the worker, Miss 
Elizabeth McMurray, and a large living room. 

The large room will serve as a community center, 
Library, Reading Room, Sunday School rooms, 
meeting place for the Young People's and Junior 
Service Leagues, Recreation Center and other 
Community Activities. 

The people in the community are donating some 
of the material and the labor. Mr. and Mrs. R. R. 
Stone are giving the funds needed to complete the 
building. The building will be called "The Stone 
Memorial Hall", in memory of Mr. Stone's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. William Stone, of that Community. 



Sunday, February 25th, marked the opening 
of the Centennial Celebration of the Robert E. 
Lee Memorial Church in Lexington, Virginia. 

The opening Centennial Service was conducted 
by the Right Rev. Robert C. Jett, D. D., the re- 
tired Bishop of the Diocease of Southwestern 
Virginia, assisted by the Rector, the Rev- Thomas 
H. Wright, and two visiting Clergymen, the 
Rev. Edmund Berkeley and the Rev. Arthur E. 
Koch. During the service a history of the Par- 
ish was read by Captain Greenlee D. Letcher, a 
son of the Civil War governor of Virginia and a 
member of one of the most distinguished fami- 
lies in this old Virginia Parish. Following read- 
ing of the history the opening Centennial Sermon 
was preached by the Right Rev. Thomas Camp- 
bell Darst, D. D., the Bishop of East Carolina. 

This historic Church being known as Grace 
Church from 1840 until 1882, and then changed 
to the Robert E. Lee Memorial Church, has 
had a long and useful service. Situated near 
the campus of the Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity, it has always been attended by both stu- 
dents of this University and the Cadets of the 
Virginia Military Institute. 

After the war between the States, General 
Robert E. Lee served as Senior Warden of this 
Church for several years. In the list of the for- 
mer Rectors of this Church are many outstand- 
ing names. The Rev. William S. Pendleton was 
Rector both before and after the Civil War; the 
Rev. W. Cosby Bell, D. D., who later became 
Professor of Theology at the Virginia Theologi- 
cal Seminary; the Rev. Oscar deWolf Randolph, 
D. D., now Rector of the Virginia Episcopal 
School ; the Rev. Churchill J. Gibson, D. D., the 
present Rector of St. James' Church, Richmond, 
Virginia, and the Rev. Vincent C. Franks, D. D., 
present Rector of St. Paul's Church in Richmond, 
Virginia. 

The opening of the Centennial Celebration on 
February 25th was preceded by a week of prayer 
and Rededication led by the present Rector the 
Rev. Thomas H. Wright. During this week three 
services a day were held in the Church and all 
members of the congregation were called upon 
to rededicate themselves to the principles of 
Jesus Christ through the work of their Church. 

The Centennial Program will run from the 
month of February through the month of May. 



MARCH, 1940 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 



Whereas, the members of St. Paul's Auxiliary, 
Greenville, desire to express their deep sense of 
loss in the death of Mrs. Hattie Skinner, and their 
high appreciation of her outstanding services as 
a member of their organization : therefore be it 

Resolved, that in the death of Mrs. Skinner, St. 
Paul's Auxiliary has lost one of its most worthy 
and faithful members, that her zeal and efforts in 
this group were tremendous forces in all its ac- 
complishments : and that the spirit of her unself- 
ish devotion and tireless energy will ever be with 
its members as a source of inspiration. 

Resolved, that we, her associates in this organi- 
zation, have lost a loved and valued friend and 
that we extend our heartfelt sympathy to her fam- 
ily in their sorrow, and, claim the privilege of 
sharing with them in their bereavement. 

Resolved, that a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to her family, recorded in our Auxiliary 
minutes and sent to The Mission Herald and daily 
papers for publication. 

MARY DAIL, 
BETSEY GREENE, 
BESSIE WOOTEN. 



MEMORIAL SERVICE 



In the passing of Mrs. Hattie Skinner, St. Paul's 
Auxiliary of the Episcopal Church, Greenville, 
has lost its oldest and one of its best-loved mem- 
bers. Out of love for her and her family, the 
Auxiliary, held, on Monday afternoon, a Mem- 
orial Service for her in the beautiful guild room 
which bears her name. 

Mrs. Frank Wooten, who had charge of the pro- 
gram, said that Mrs. Skinner's interests lay in 
her friends, her family, and her Church. Each of 
these she served with a loyalty possessed by few 
people. 

After the reading of the scripture lesson by 
Mrs. F. C. Harding, Mrs. W. B. Brown, a friend 
of fifty years standing, paid a beautiful tribute 
to that friendship. She recalled especially Mrs. 
Skinner's keen sense of humor which never failed 
her, even in the hard places. A fitting climax to 
this tribute was Ella Wheeler Wilcox's "Beyond", 
sung by Miss Bessie Brown. 

Mrs. R. Williams, another friend of long stand- 
ing, recalled how Mrs. Skinner worked for the 
Auxiliary during its early days, carrying it on as 
its president for many years. Until her death her 
love for the Auxiliary and her interest in all its 
activities never lessened. 

Mr. Wicker said that as a church member Mrs. 



Skinner was the kind of member who gives a Rec- 
tor courage to go on. In her death the Church 
in East Carolina has lost one of its most devoted, 
loyal and generous supporters. 



FORTH' 



FORMERLY "THE SPIRIT 

OF MISSIONS" 



It seems that we must accept graciously the 
passing of the name "Spirit of Missions" which 
is now being published under the title "Forth." 
The old name of "The Spirit of Missions" will, 
however, be retained as a sub-title. 

National Council tried to face the facts square- 
ly before making the change, and consulted with 
the best experts on publicity and promotion, in- 
cluding magazines. Without exception, the Na- 
tional Council was told that the name "The Spir- 
it of Missions" was most unfortunate and that 
under that title it could never hope to do the job 
that it was intended to do for the Church. 

We recall, that, General Convention meeting at 
Atlantic City, quite definitely and specifically told 
the National Council that it should revamp the 
promotional system of the Church and modernize 
it in every respect. National Council has been 
trying to do this in its promotional materials 
from the Church Missions House this past year 
and "The Spirit of Missions" could not be exempt. 

In making the change, National Council tried to 
keep in mind that the magazine primarily is in- 
tended for the laity. The ordinary layman thinks 
he has little or no interest in so-called "missions" 
and it doesn't help the situation to flash the title 
"r"issions" constantly before him. National Coun- 
cil is honestly trying to do a good job in reaching 
this ordinary layman and convincing him of the 
value of the Church in every category — local, 
Diocesan and missionary. It is trying to change 
somewhat the fact that only about one-third of 
our Episcopal Church communicants give to the 
Church or are in any sense active. 

National Council assures us it has not been 
easy to make such changes as have been made, 
but they have been made thoughtfully and prayer- 
fully with the welfare of the whole Church in 
view, and the Council has only the best motives 
at heart in this action. 

It is difficult, however, to break away from an 
old friend and accept the new. The Spirit of Mis- 
sions has laid the foundation upon which our 
National Council's new magazine is building and 
therefore, we shall fall in line with the Forward 
March of the Church and go forth with "Forth". 

Contributed. 



l]oung People's Service League 



By Mary D. Home, Publicity Chairman 



DEDICATED TO THOSE MEMBERS OF THE 

Y. P. S. L. WHO SERVE AS CHOIR 

MOTHERS FOR THE JUNIOR CHOIR 



When Lenten Season rolls around 

And services begin, 
The Junior Choir lets down its hair 

And peace and quietness end. 

For every day at five o'clock 

The children far and near, 
Come flocking in to sing the songs 

We know and love to hear. 

And we who bear the title of 

"Choir Mothers" know them best 

For just let Sue get Johnnie's book 
And then we'll have no rest. 

Till Johnnie gets another book, 

We claim is just as good, 
And then comes Mary to report 

Somebody took her hood. 

We find it — get her vestments out, 

Then look for hair to brush 
And grimy faces to be washed, 

And noisy yells to hush. 

And after they are in the Church, 

With lagging steps we come ; 
All loaded down with jumping ropes, 

Jackrocks, and chewing gum. 

And when the choir comes marching out 

We're ready to receive 
The endless stream of vestments that 

These midget song birds leave. 

But somehow when it's Easter Morn, 

And Lent is gone at last, 
A kind of sadness fills our hearts 

For what has just gone past. 

For we admit we love it, and 

Would not exchange a mint 
For Haram-Scaram children of 

The Junior Choir in Lent. 

FLORENCE DAVIS, 

St. Paul's, Wilmington. 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON MEETING 



The Young People's Service League of the Con- 
vocation of Wilmington will meet in Wilmington 
on Sunday, March the thirty-first, 1940. 

The members of the Leagues in the Convoca- 
tions are requested to be at St. Paul's Church for 
the morning Service at 11:15 o'clock. The Bish- 
op will hold the service and preach. 

After the service, the League members will 
go to St. James' Church for lunch. All are ex- 
pected to bring box lunches with them. 

At two o'clock the business session will be held 
at St. James' Church. 

Program For the Business Session 

Prayers — Bishop Darst. 

Hymn. 

Devotional Service: St. John's, Wilmington. 

Roll Call by the Secretary. 

Address of Welcome: St. James', Wilmington. 

Response: St. Stephen's, Goldsboro. 

Plans for Camp Leach — Camp Leach* Committee. 

Camp Song: Ho, Camp Leach For Me. 

Program on Camp Leach: St. John's, Fayette- 

ville. 
Address — Bishop Darst. 
Hymn. 
Closing Service and Benediction — Bishop Darst. 



MR. DOUGLAS DOWDY HAS DONE GOOD 
WORK AT CLINTON AND FAISON 



Mr. Douglas Dowdy, who has served St. Paul's, 
Clinton and St. Gabriel's, Faison, during his vaca- 
tion period has done unusually good work accord- 
ing to reports from the field. Mr. Dowdy is a 
student of DuBose Memorial Training School, 
Monteagle, Tennessee and will have to return to 
the school in a few days. 



THE MEN OF GRACE CHURCH, PLYMOUTH 



The men of Grace Church, Plymouth, were 
organized for work several years ago. In a letter 
recently received from one of the laymen we are 
told that "There is much interest being manifest- 
ed in the Club by the men of Grace Church." We 
would like to hear from other Clubs in the Diocese. 
There are a number that are very active and they 
can help other places by making a report of their 
work. 



MARCH, 1940 



11 



MEETING OF THE FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



A meeting of the Finance Department was held 
in the Diocesan Office, Wilmington, March 8, 1940. 

Present: Rev. John R. Tolar, Chairman; Major 
J. S. Huske, Fayetteville ; Mr. J. A. Moore, Eden- 
ton; Mr. W. G. Gaither, Elizabeth City; Major 
McC. B. Wilson and Mr. W. B. Campbell, Wilmin- 
ton. , 

The Bishop and Treasurer were also present. 

The purpose of the meeting was to make prep- 
aration for a meeting to be held in Kinston with 
a Committee appointed to assist the Finance De- 
partment in its effort to raise the balance due on 
the Diocesan Debt. 

Mr. W. B. Campbell and Major McC. B. Wilson 
were appointed members of a Committee to work 
with the Treasurer in preparing a full list of the 
securities owned by the Diocese and a statement 
of its financial status. 



SECOND MEETING OF THE FINANCE 
DEPARTMENT 



Another meeting of the Finance Department 
was held in Kinston, March 14, 1940. 

Those who had been appointed by the Bishop 
to assist the Finance Department in the matter 
of the debt were invited to this meeting. 

Present: Rev. John R. Tolar, Chairman of Fi- 
nance Department; Rev. E. F. Moseley, Kinston; 
Rev. Charles A. Ashby, Edenton; Mrs. James G. 
Staton, Williamston; Mr. J. A. Moore, Edenton; 
Mr. W. H. Hudson, Edenton ; Mr. W. G. Gaither, 
Elizabeth City ; Mr Guy C. Harding, Washington ; 
Mr. James Smith, Goldsboro; Mr. W. D. Holt, 
Fayetteville; Mr. A. K Barrus, Kinston; Rev. 
W. R. Noe, Wilmington. 

The following resolution of the Annual Con- 
vention was given careful consideration and ap- 
propriate action was taken: 

"RESOLVED : That the Department of Finance 
be and same is hereby directed to consolidate the 
indebtedness of the Diocese existing on January 
1, 1939, with the unpaid indebtedness incurred 
during the year 1939 and apportion the aggregate 
amount thereof among the different parishes 
and missions on the basis of their respective 
number of communicants and that each said parish 
and mission be requested to assume direct respon- 
sibility for the amounts so determined to be their 
proper share thereof and that each parish and 
mission be given credit for the amounts paid by 
them respectively on their said shares as request- 
ed in the resolutions passed by the conferences at 
Washington and White Lake and the Coordination 



Committee appointed by Bishop Darst." 

The Treasurer of the Diocese was requested to 
send a full report of the action taken to each 
parish and mission, when the information is 
furnished him by the Secretary of the meeting. 



THE MARCH CLERGY CONFERENCE 



Despite the pressure of Lenten duties, twelve 
of the clergy attended the conference on March 
5th in St. Paul's, Greenville, and were unanimous 
in their expressions of appreciation and interest 
in the consideration of the place of prayer in 
their personal lives. It was decidedly a helpful 
and suggestive meeting. 

Services were held in the chapel, where the Rev. 
W. H. R. Jackson celebrated Holy Communion. 
Following a period of silent prayer, the Rev. Worth 
Wicker, Rector of St. Paul's, gave a deeply spirit- 
ual and searching meditation on the meaning and 
significance of mental prayer. Without prayer, 
no clergyman can function as a true priest of the 
Church of God. Prayer must become the com- 
plete abandonment of one's self to communion with 
God and involves certain definite acts, by which 
it is enriched and strengthened. It must eventu- 
ate in true consecration and purity of life. Fra. 
Wicker suggested certain practical applications 
of the art of prayer that were considered of vital 
importance to all present. It was a thought pro- 
voking meditation that drew the worshipping 
clergy into a new determination to spend more 
time in prayer and meditation. 

In the absence of the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, 
who had been asked to lead the discussion on 
prayer, the Rev. Jack R. Rountree presented the 
spiritual meaning of prayer in its intimate rela- 
tionship of fellowship with the Father and the 
complete surrender of our wills to His will. With- 
out prayer there can be no true Christian living. 
Mr. Rountree concluded the discussion by leading 
the group in a season of prayers for the clergy, 
the parishes of the Diocese, the Diocese, world 
peace, missions and the advancement of the King- 
dom of God, through the activities of the Clergy 
and Church in East Carolina. 

Lunch was served in the parish house and ad- 
journment had at two o'clock. 

It was voted to have the next conference on 
April second, in Greenville. The theme will be 
"The Clergyman in His Relations with the Com- 
munity". The Rev. Stephen Gardner will cele- 
brate Holy Communion, the Rev. E. W. Halleck 
will lead the meditations, and the Rev. John W. 
Hardy will have the discussion. 

JACK R. ROUNTREE. 



32 



THE MISSION HERALD 



LETTER FROM MISS VENETIA COX 



Diocesan Union School, 
Chennan, Yunnan, 
January 24, 1940. 

Dear Friends: 

I am so far behind in my correspondence, I am 
going to use this way of answering some of 
the valued letters from friends at home. Some of 
you wrote me steamer letters 'way back in Sep- 
tember, and they are unanswered, I regret to 
say. To you, let me say how much I appreciated 
and enjoyed them. The journey was unusual and 
dull compared with former trips, but we met with 
no dangers on the route. A boat prepared for de- 
fense is not conducive to gaiety and fun. 

It seemed strange to me not to leave the boat 
at Shanghai. I felt like I was deserting my native 
place. But Hongkong has so many of our Hupeh 
Chinese friends living there now I was very happy 
the ten days I was there. The Anglican Church 
has opened a guest house there and members of 
our missionary Diocese always enjoy the hospital- 
ity offered by Misses Elliott and Griffin, the host- 
esses there. 

The boat trip from Hongkong to Haiphong was 
as uninteresting as the ocean trip, because I again 
travelled on a British vessel. From there we be- 
gan a train trip filled with interest, beauty, and 
hardships. The mountains, valleys and streams 
will never be forgotten — they are so beautiful. It 
was one long, steady climb from the borders of 
French-Indo China right up to Kunming, which is 
6400 feet high, and we passed through 172 tunnels. 
The courage of engineers to plan and accomplish a 
feat like that is certainly to be admired. But sit- 
ting on wooden slats for three long days with all 
the dirt and filth of a Chinese train around one 
takes away some of the joys of the trip. 

I spent a week with friends in Kunming before 
starting on the truck trip to Chennan. We were 
successful in getting room on a large open truck 
owned by the new Yunnan-Burma Railroad, for 
most of our baggage, and we sat on top of it, ar- 
riving here November 26th. I had expected our 
new school truck to meet me in Kunming but there 
was a delay in starting from Chungking, so we 
waited until January 5th before it actually reached 
Chennan. And when it arrived it was a Burma 
bus, with a strong, splendid engine, and room for 
ten passengers and baggage, which is much more 
suitable to our needs than a larger truck would 
be. 

I went to Kunming to meet Mr. Allen, who had 
driven it that far and to direct him over the roads 
to Chennan. With us we brought the remainder 



of my baggage, baggage belonging to Miss Seng, 
and many supplies for the school, and you should 
have seen and heard the rejoicing at the school 
when we arrived. It was a gala day. 

Our fall term closed on the 13th of January and 
on the 15th we made our first trip on a bus into 
Kunming. We took ten students away for their 
holidays and made the trip in eight hours, com- 
pared with three days on the local bus. When I 
tell you the distance is only 146 miles you will 
wonder why it took us so long. If you could see 
the condition of our roads, and how we have to 
wind around so many very high mountains, you 
would understand. We feel we are almost break- 
ing all speed laws when traveling 30 miles an 
hour. And the hairpin turns. I've never been 
around so many difficult ones. I was so grateful 
to have Mr. Allen at the wheel. But alas, he left 
us in Kunming for Red Cross work in Kweiyang, 
and I had to drive the car home. Four Chinese 
gentlemen came as passengers, and were ready to 
protect me "if need be", but they knew nothing 
about a car. No one will ever know how much I 
feared the journey before starting, but we were 
wonderfully guided and protected every step of the 
way, and it was with a grateful heart to God for 
His goodness to us that we stopped at our front 
door that evening. 

We can't afford a chauffeur, and until a Chi- 
nese member of the faculty is trained in, I shall 
have to do all the driving. But as we can buy 
only enough gas for one round trip to Kunming 
a month, I shall not be overworked at present. 
After the fall of Nanning, our supplies came in 
only by train from Haiphong. Now the bridges 
have been broken on this line and nothing is com- 
ing through that way, but the companies are plan- 
ning trips down into Burma for supplies and we 
hope they will soon arrive. But they will have 
to come by truck as the train track is still being 
laid, which means that prices will soar even high- 
er than they are now. 

To all of you who have made this gift to our 
school possible, we want to say thank you again. 
May we be able to run it the rest of our refugee 
life. 

As to my teaching work since my return, I have 
added eight periods of English teaching to my 
music schedule, due to Miss Sherman's departure 
for furlough in October, and I have had to strug- 
gle with all the forgotten rules of my mother 
tongue. The quarters we live in are slowly im- 
proving. We at last have room for all of our 
classes, and beds are being made for the girls to 
sleep on. Miss Gosline and I also boast of seven 
articles of furniture, exclusive of the five wooden 
stools for us to sit on, and a room six feet square 



MARCH, 1940 



13 






as a kitchen. If we could only get carpenters we 
would be more comfortable in a very short time, 
but the new railroad has employed all but one in 
this part of the country, and this one is laboring 
with beds at present. 

We have just acquired a room which is large 
enough for a chapel, and we have fitted it with 
backless board benches and an altar. This gives 
it a very churchly atmosphere and we enjoy our 
services in there very much. We are looking for- 
ward to the consecration of Dr. Y. Y. Tsu in March 
as Bishop of this district, and we hope he will 
come soon after to confirm our class of boys and 
girls now preparing. 

Affectionately yours, 

VENETIA COX. 



CAN YOU ANSWER THESE? 



Set of questions used in St. Paul's, Chattanoo- 
ga, Tenn., and sent to us by one of our laymen. 
We shall be glad to hear from those who can ans- 
wer them or send the answers to those who can- 
not. 

One of the answers to the following questions 
is correct — which one? 

I. The lectern is: 

A. The boy who carries the Cross. 

B. The stand on which the Bible rests. 

C. The white vestment worn by the minister. 

II. An Episcopalian is going to become a Bap- 

tist and a Baptist is going to become an Epis- 
copalian. Which of these three statements 
is true? 

A. Both must be baptized. 

B. The Baptist must be baptized but not the 
Episcopalian. 

C. The Episcopalian must be baptized, but not 
the Baptist. 

III. The difierence between a Bishop coadjutor 
and a Suffragan Bishop: 

A. The buffragan has not the right to confirm. 

B. The Suffragan has not the right to ordain. 

C. The Coadjutor succeeds the Bishop of the 
Diocese, the Suffragan does not succeed. 

IV. The Diocese is divided into three sections, 
which are called: 

A. Districts. 

B. Convocations. 

C. Provinces. 

V. The National Headquarters of the Episcopal 

Church are in: 

A. Washington. 

B. New York. 

C. Cincinnati. 



VI. A Deacon is: 

A. A layman who is licensed to preach. 

B. A layman who is preparing for the ministry. 

C. A minister in the lowest order of the min- 
istry. 

VII. A person becomes a member of the Episco- 
pal Church through: 

A. Baptism. 

B. Profession of faith. 

C. Confirmation. 

VIII. The New Testament is composed of the 
books decided upon by: 

A. The Council of Carthage in 398. 

B. The Council of Janmia in 100. 

C. Includes all early books which were written 
by the apostles. 

IX. The Crucifer is: 

A. The boy who swings the incense pot in an 
Anglo-Catholic service. 

B. The seven branch candle sticks on the Epis- 
tle side of the Altar. 

C. The boy who carries the Cross. 

X. An Acolyte is: 

A. A boy who serves at the Altar. 

B. The silver plate in which the Communion 
bread is placed. 

C. One of the pieces of silk cloth used as a mar- 
ker for the Bible. 

XL At a wedding in the Episcopal Church the 
persons who decide what music to be sung is : 

A. The Rector. 

B. The Bride. 

C. The Bride's mother. 

D. The Organist. 

XII. The only time that the Rector of a Parish is 
required to meet a person at the door of a 
Church is: 

A. At a funeral. 

B. At the Institution of the Vestry. 

C. When the Bishop of the Diocese makes his 
official visitation. 

XIII. For a baptism to be valid it must be per- 
formed by: 

A. A minister of the Church. 

B. A Minister or some other member of the 
Church. 

C. By anyone at all, provided baptism is with 
water, and in the name of the Trinity. 

XIV. True or false, A. B. C. 

A. No child under nine years of age may be 
confirmed in the Episcopal Church. 

B. Roman Catholics have been confirmed, but 
must be re-confirmed. 

C. Lutherans have been confirmed, but must be 
reconfirmed. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE INLAND WATERWAY MISSIONS 



Rev. J. Leon Malone, Priest in Charge 

The Inland Waterway Missions were started by 
the late Rev. A. H. Marshall, in his Church Boat, 
along the coast of Eastern North Carolina, in 
1938. Mr. Marshall contacted a number of iso- 
lated, neglected communities, such as those de- 
scribed below, but in order to do a more construc- 
tive work, decided to concentrate in two places, 
Tar Landing in Onslow County, and Calabash in 
Brunswick County. 

Tar Landing 

At Tar Landing there are approximately twen- 
ty-five families, seventy-five or more people liv- 
ing within a mile of the store where the Services 
are held. The people depend largely upon fishing 
and farming and their means are very limited. 
There were no community activities before the 
Services were held in the store. 

Wilmington, thirty-five miles away is the most 
used trading center, and has the nearest hospi- 
tals. It is twenty-three miles to the nearest phy- 
sician. There is no Church, rural mail route, nor 
telephone in the community. 

The people are of good stock, very appreciative, 
responsive, and co-operative, and want a Church. 
The attendance at the Services varys from thirty 
to eighty. We would like to build a Church and 
furnish it as soon as possible. 

We would also like to be able to place a worker 
there, at least until the work is organized. 

St. Andrew's, Calabash 

Calabash is fifty miles South of Wilmington, 
thirty five miles from Southport and the County 
Hospital, twenty-five miles from the nearest de- 
pot, fourteen miles from the nearest post office, 
school, telephone, and physician. 

Seasonal fishing is the chief industry. Nat- 
urally the means of the people are limited. We see 
material needs that makes ones heart ache. How- 
ever we are following the policy of trying to help 
the people to help themselves, and are putting 
the Spiritual needs of the people first. 

We are establishing clothing stations in these 
missions. Clothing will be sold at low costs, ex- 
cept in emergencies ; thus giving us funds for the 
work, making low priced clothing available for 
the people, causing them to have a better atti- 
tude toward the Church than if too much is 
given, and giving friends of the work opportun- 
ity to assist by sending clothing. 

Early in 1939 Mr. Marshall built a small Church 
in Calabash and labored there devotedly as much 
as his time and strength would permit. 



In September 1939 Miss Elizabeth McMurray of 
Clinton went to Calabash as a Christian Worker, 
Bishop Darst providing her living expense there. 
She is one of God's Saints, consecrated, intelli- 
gent, and diligent. 

Among the other things, she has organized a 
Sunday School with forty-nine members and 
trained local teachers to assist in the work. The 
nearest Church before St. Andrew's was six miles 
away. There is a Junior League with twenty-two 
members and a Y. P. S. L. with eighteen members. 
She has a mid week Bible Class, and Evening Ser- 
vice every Sunday. 

She is preparing a playground, providing re- 
creation, doing much visiting (on foot) and social 
work in the community. She encourages, and as- 
sists wherever possible the boys and girls in get- 
ting an education. She has made it possible for 
one girl to go to college this year, and is working 
on plans for others to go in the future. She is 
also responsible for getting a delinquent boy in 
a Church School and saving him from a stay in 
the State Reformatory. 

We have much evidence of the success of the 
work. Such statements as the following are 
frequently heard in the community, "The Lord 
certainly led Mr. Marshall here. A Church was so 
greatly needed." "I can tell you that there is a 
lot of difference here." "What has been done for 

is ample pay for all the effort that 

has been made." "I am amazed at the interest 
that the people take in the Church." "It is the 
first public gathering I have seen in Calabash 
with no drunks present. The men actually stayed 
sober for the Christmas program." "The chil- 
dren obey Miss McMurray better than they do 
their parents, and they obey their parents better 
than they did before she came." 

The story would not be complete without a word 
concerning the responsiveness and cooperation of 
the children. 

Further information can be had from Rev. J. 
Leon Malone, R. F. D. 3, Wilmington, N. C. ; Rt. 
Rev. Thomas C. Darst, Wilmington, N. C. ; Miss 
Elizabeth McMurray, Calabash Route, Shal- 
lotte, N. C; or The Diocesan Office, Box 483, 
Wilmington, N. C. 



MEN'S CUB OF ST. JOHN'S, WILMINGTON 



The Men's Club of St. John's, Wilmington, un- 
der the leadership of its President, Mr. Nathan 
Haskett, continues to do good work. Recently a 
picture of the officers appeared in the local pa- 
pers. The meetings are well attended and much 
constructive work is done. Rev. E. W. Halleck 
is Re tor of the Parish. 



MARCH, 1940 



15 



IN MEMORIAM 



Alice London Calder 

With sorrow and a deep sense of loss, we, 
the members of the Woman's Auxiliary of St. 
James' Church, Wilmington, N. C. desire to pay 
tribute to the memory of Alice London Calder, a 
beloved Auxiliary member who entered into Life 
Eternal on March 4th. 

A consecrated church worker since I860, she 
was for many years a regular attendant at the 
General Church Conventions where she gained 
inspiration and enthusiasm. She was not only 
active in the Woman's Auxiliary but formed var- 
ious branches of work among the children. Sh? 
also conducted the first study class in St. James' 
Church. Though the traditions of the past were 
dear to her, she readily assimilated all that was 
best in modern life. 

In her death we have lost one of earth's choicest 
spirits, a friend whose gracious manner, keen 



intellect and radiant Christianity endeared her to 
all who knew her. 

"Well done good and faithful servant; enter 
thou into the joy of thy Lord." 

MARGARET IREDELL LATIMER 
ELIZABETH STONE STRANGE 

(Committee for the Woman's Auxiliary) 



FROM MISS ELIZABETH G. GRIFFIN, OUR 
MISSIONARY TO THE PHILIPPINES 



For the past two years, the Churches in Ma- 
nilla have given out their mite boxes in Advent 
and collected them the third Sunday after Epi- 
phany. This is done primarily because Easter 
comes in the midst of the hot season, when every 
one who can get out of Manila does so. The first 
Sunday in January the Church Schools of the Ca- 
thedral, St. Luke's, St. Stephen's and St. Peter's 
came together at the Cathedral and presented 
their offering together. It was a most impress- 
ive service. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 
GENERAL CHURCH WORK. JANUARY J. 1940 TO DECEMBER 31, 1940 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 

Paid 

to 

Mar. 23 

1940 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $ 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

Lumberton, Trinity 

New Bern, Christ Church 

.ted Springs, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Soupthport, St. Philip's 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Whiteville, Grace Church 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Wilmington, St. James' : 1,902.15 

Wilmington, St. John's 300.60 

Wilmington, St. Paul's _ 105.00 



100.00 
163.30 

50.00 

15.00 

261.70 



27.25 



60.23 



Organized Missions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Campbellton, St. Philip-Apostle 
Faison, St. Gabriel's . . . 

North West, All Soul's 

Pikeville, St. George's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's .. 



Unorganized Missions 

Calabash, St. Andrew's 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Tolar-Hart. Good Shepherd 
Tar Landing 



Paid 
to 
Mar. 23 
1940 

5 2.00 

5.00 



6.38 



Total « 2,998.61 



Parishes 

Aurora, noly Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City Christ Church 

Fairnville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville St. Mary's 

Greenville, St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Jessama, Zion 

f .aire Landinu. St. Georee's 

Flymouth, Grace Church ._• 

Rooer, St. Luke's 

Washington, St. Peter's 

Williamston, Advent _. 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 

Windsor, St. Thomas' .... 

Wmton. St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 



2.00 



400.00 
103.35 



17.00 
128.33 



5.00 

50.00 

7.00 

500.01 

50.00 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murf'-epshoro. St. Barnabas' 

Fn\-obel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Wintpiville, St. Luke's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Missions 

Avoca, Holy Innocents 

Parochial Missions 

Creswell. Galilee Mission 



10.00 



19.00 
25.00 



35.00 



Total $ 1,351.69 



Parishes 

J'avettevillc , St. Joseph's 

New Bern St. Cyprian's 

Wilmington, St. Mark's ,... 

Organized Missions 

Belhaven. St. Mary's 

Laento-i. St. John-Evangelist 

Elizabeth City, St. PhihD's 

Goldsboro. St. Andrew's 

Kinston, ~t. Aug'istine's 

Washington, St. Paul's 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 

Unorganized Missions 

Aurora. St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Farmville, St. Timothy's 

G r eenville. St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper, St. Ann's 

25.00 Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission ... 



5.00 



3.00 
3.50 



Total $ 36.50 



Grand Total $ 4.386.80 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 






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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 

of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 

Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 

Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 

Wilmington, N. C. 






INVESTMENTS ! 



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Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
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A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and Ji. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 

of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
W.lmington, N. C. 



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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND j 
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Raleigh, North Carolina j 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter | 
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President 



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CHAPiSL HILL, N. C. 
Jan. 41 



UN.C 
CAROLINA R& 





o 




^rl^tra^t^rarrt^^ay-comrlRe^^iiy 



MISSIONS ARE MORAL EQUIVALENT OF WAR, 

SAYS PRESIDING BISHOP 



The very mention of foreign missions may seem pre- 
posterous at a time when so many of those who profess 
allegiance to the Prince of Peace are themselves engaged 
in war. If, however, we turn to Christ for guidance, will 
not His answer to our question be: "Blessed are the 
peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God." 

As a means of attaining this blessing, He told His dis- 
ciples to go into all the world and preach the Gospel to 
every creature. The motive that impels men to obey this 
command is that spirit of Divine love which was mani- 
fested by Christ when He gave His life in sacrifice for 
those who were His bitter enemies. That love implanted 
in our human hearts leaps over the barriers that separate 
man from man and nation from nation. It makes neigh- 
bors of those who are far off. It transcends the prejudice 
that arises out of race differences. It is the only power 
that can transform our human selfishness into a burning 
desire to do good unto all men. 

Missionary service is the application of that love of 
Christ to all our human relationships. It is the moral 
equivalent for war. Was there ever a time when the need 
was greater for speaking this Gospel of love to the utter- 
most parts of the earth ?— H. ST. GEORGE TUCKER. 



o 



V 



APRIL 




1940 




THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 

Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Editor 

REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 

Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 



Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furni shed on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 



LOYALTY TO CHURCH'S WORSHIP 



In his annual charge to the Diocese of Chicago 
the Rt. Rev. George Craig Stewart called atten- 
tion to a grave situation which has developed 
throughout the Church in America concerning 
the unrestrained license which the clergy em- 
ploy in the use of the Book of Common Prayer. 
We find ourselves in full and complete accord with 
the position of Bishop Stewart. Our attention 
has been aroused on several occasions in the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina by the apparent indiffer- 
ence and unconcern on the part of some officiat- 
ing clergymen to the proper place for the Prayer 
Book in our worship, and the necessity of the 
clergy to read it reverently, devoutly and with 
complete loyalty to its rubrical requirements. 

The very genius of our worship demands that 
our ritual and liturgy be conducted in an orderly 
and decent manner, with due consideration of 
its form and substance. Our so-called protest- 
antism often creates in us an unwillingness to 
conform to what is required by the rubrics and 
of long and universal practice in the Church. But 
this is in violation of the vows of our ordination, 
in which we pledge loyalty to the Church, its wor- 
ship and ministry. Under the system of the 
Catholic Church, the individual whims and fan- 
cies of the clergyman must be brought into obe- 
dience to the Church. For as Bishop Anderson 
said in reference to the 1928 Prayer Book. "I was 
in favor of deleting some features of the Prayer 
Book which have been retained and of inserting 
some features which have not been included. 
What am I to do about it? I am not the Church. 



The Church is wiser than I am. I have more 
confidence in the corporate judgement of the 
Church than in my own personal opinion, and 
even if I had not, I am under obligation to yield 
my preferences." 

"It is, after all, a matter of loyalty to our or- 
dination vows to conform to the doctrine and 
discipline and worship of the Church as set forth 
in its creeds and Catechism and its Canon law, 
and in the directions for public worship in its 
Prayer Book." 

As a matter of fact, the essentiality of form in 
worship is not only spiritually and sacramentally 
sound, but of highest psychological value. To 
neglect it is consequently a violation of that which 
is a religious and spiritual necessity. 

No clergyman has a right to be slovenly, in- 
different, careless and neglectful in his use of the 
Prayer Book in the conduct of public worship, 
according to the universal custom and practice 
of the Church. 



CONTEST ON EVANGELISM 



In sponsoring an educational contest in the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina, the Executive Board of the 
Woman's Auxiliary chose as the theme for the 
current effort, "Evangelism First — Why?" Con- 
siderable interest was aroused in the study of 
Evangelism, though only a few submitted papers. 
That the program was well worth while is evident 
by the high quality of the papers presented. 
Several of the papers indicated considerable re- 
search and study — all manifested a deep interest 
in the real work of the Church — the winning of 
men and women to accept Jesus Christ as their 
Savior and the inspiration of their lives. The 
Mission Herald is delighted to be able to publish 
one of the papers submitted in the contest in this 
issue. It was well thought out, carefully and 
logically presented — we cannot but feel that it 
had been prayed over constantly by the writer. 
We urge every reader of the paper to read it care- 
fully, prayerfully and meditatively. 

The need of the Church today is for men and 
women to catch the spirit of the Gospel, live it, 
preach it, teach it, and bring back that holy en- 
thusiasm that, marked the work of the early dis- 
ciples. Men and women took knowledge of them 
that they had been with Jesus. Would that men 
couM ta" e knowledge of the Christians today that 
they literally lived and walked and talked with 
Jesus. The world's need — again "to see Jesus". 
But this can come only as we can truly say, "I 
live, yet not I but Christ liveth in me and the life 
which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith 
of the Son of God who loved me and gave Himself 
up for me." 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C, APRIL 1940 



NUMBER 4 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



In closing my letter in the March issue of The 
Mission Herald I told you of my activities on 
Palm Sunday and promised to begin my April let- 
ter with a report of the Holy Week and Easter 
services, and I am now gladly keeping that prom- 
ise. 

On Tuesday in Holy Week, March nineteenth, 
at 8:00 P. M. I preached to our fine union congre- 
gation in the Community Hall at Penderlea Farms 
and was glad to note that our faithful Communi- 
ty Pastor, the Rev. W. J. B. Burrus, had arranged 
for services with visiting preachers, for every 
night during Holy Week. 

On Wednesday, the twentieth, I conducted 
Evening Prayer in St. John's Church, Wilming- 
ton, at 5:00 P. M. 

On Maundy Thursday at 8:00 P. M., I assisted 
in the Communion Service in St. James' Church, 
Wilmington. 

On Good Friday, owing to the temporary ill- 
ness of the Rector, Rev. E. W. Halleck, I read 
Morning Prayer and made a brief meditation in 
St. John's Church, Wilmington, at 10:00 A. M. 

On the night of Good Friday, I preached and 
confirmed seven persons presented by the Rev. 
J. Leon Malone, in St. Andrew's Church, Wrights- 
ville Sound. 

On Saturday, the twenty-third, I assisted in a 
funeral in a private home in Wilmington at 
4:00 P. M. 

On Easter Day I celebrated Holy Communion 
in St. John's, Wilmington, at 7:30 A. M. 

At 11:00 A. M. on Easter Day I preached, con- 
firmed six persons presented by the Rev. Fred- 
erick A. Turner, and celebrated Holy Communion 
in the Church of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington. 
This service marked my twenty-fifth annual vis- 
it to the Church of the Good Shepherd on Easter 
Sunday. 

Following Easter Mrs. Darst and I spent a few 
restful days at Myrtle Beach, S. C. 

On Sunday, March the thirty-first, at 11:00 A. 
M., I preached and confirmed ten persons pre- 
sented by the Rev. Alexander Miller in St. 
Paul's Church, Wilmington. We all rejoiced to 
have Mr. Miller back with us after his long ill- 
ness and we look forward with joyful confidence 
to his complete restoration to vigorous health. 



On the afternoon of the thirty-first, I made 
an address at the splendidly attended meeting 
of the Wilmington Convocation of the Y. P. S. L. 

On Thursday evening, April the fourth, I at- 
tended a supper meeting of the Laymen's League 
of St. James', Wilmington.. 

On Saturday morning, the sixth, I confirmed 
one person in St. James' Church, Wilmington. 

On Sunday the seventh, at 11:00 A. M., I 
preached and confirmed sixteen persons, present- 
ed by the Rev. W. Tate Young in St. John's 
Church, Fayetteville. The work in this fine Par- 
ish is going forward splendidly under the enthu- 
siastic and able leadership of the new Rector. 

On the afternoon of the seventh, I preached 
and confirmed eight persons presented by the 
Rev. J. S. Braithwaite in St. Joseph's Church, 
Fayetteville. In the evening, I preached in St. 
Philip's Church (Campbellton) Fayetteville. 

On the afternoon of the eleventh, assisted by 
the Rev. Mortimer Glover and the Rev. J. Leon 
Malone, I officiated at a funeral in Wilmington. 

On Saturday afternoon, the thirteenth, I bap- 
tized an infant boy in a private home in Ply- 
mouth. 

On Sunday, the fourteenth, at 11:00 A. M., 
I preached and confirmed eight persons present- 
ed by the Rev. Sidney E. Matthews in Grace 
Church, Plymouth. This hundred-year-old Par- 
ish has taken on new life and it rejoiced my heart 
to note the fine, intelligent interest being shown 
by the men of Grace Church. There is no doubt 
of the fact that the town and the Church have 
entered upon a new era of growth and develop- 
ment and I am hoping that we may have a resi- 
dent minister before many more months in order 
that we may take full advantage of the really 
wonderful opportunities before the Church at this 
time. 

On the night of the fourteenth I preached to 
a large congregation in St. Luke's, Roper. It 
was with real joy that I noticed the presence of 
the Baptist and Methodist ministers of the town 
who had given up their own services that night 
in order that they and their people might wor- 
ship with us. 

On the afternoon of the fifteenth, accompa- 
nied by the Rev. Stephen Gardner, I went down 
to Camp Leach and was glad to find the grounds 
and buildings in such splendid condition. Our 



THE MISSION HERALD 



beloved Camp has never looked better than it does 
today and when I drove out of the Camp gate 
I could almost hear old Camp Leach saying, 'I'll 
be seeing you and hundreds of your fine boys 
and girls this summer!" We will be there in 
great numbers and I believe v/e will have a great 
and glorious season. 

From Camp Leach Mr. Gardner and I went on 
to Belhaven where we called on the Rev. Augus- 
tus Hawkins, one of our faithful young colore :1 
priests who had to retire on account of ill health 
a few years ago. 

We missed seeing the Rev. and Mrs. A. J. 
Mackie as both of them were at Duke Hospital in 
attendance upon their sick baby. We hope and 
pray that this dear child will soon be restored to 
perfect health. 

From Belhaven we went on to Sladesville in 
Hyde County, where I paid my second annual 
visit to our new colored mission, St. Thomas. The 
service was held in the auditorium of the col- 
ored high school and, after preaching to the large 
congregation, I confirmed sixteen persons, pre- 
sented by the Rev. J. B. Brown of Washington, 
who has rendered notable service in cooperation 
with the Principal of the School, Prof. O. E. Peay. 
This promising mission in which I have confirmed 
twenty-nine persons in less than a year, has se- 
cured an attractive lot and same has been paid 
for by the Convocation of Colored Church Work- 
ers of the Diocese of East Carolina. Upon this 
lot v/e must build a church in the very near future 
— by next fall, if possible, and I commend this 
worthy undertaking to the generous intere 't of 
our people. 

We are also endeavoring to secure fund; for 
our splendid colored mission, St. Timothy's, in 
Farmville, and I know of no finer opportunity 
for constructive character building work than 
that offered by these two missions and the pio- 
neer work being done for our hitherto neglected 
white people along the Inland Waterway. We 
have no funds for these needed buildings and 
will have to depend upon the generosity of indi- 
viduals who want to share in the good work for 
Christ and His Church. 

I shall be glad to give further information to 
any who may be interested. 

For the splendid work that is being done by 
the clergy and laity in connection with the rais- 
ing of the Diocesan Debt by Whitsunday, I am 
profoundly grateful. We are going forward all 
along the line. For the sake of the Church that 
we love, let us get the debt out of the way. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 
Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 




The Rev. John Long Jackson, Charlotte, N. C, has ac- 
cepted his election as Bishop of Louisiana, and will be 
Consecrated May 1st. The Consecration Sermon will 
be preached by Bishop Darst 



BISHOPS APPOINTMENTS FOR MAY, 1940 



1 — Will preach sermon at the Consecration of 

the Rev. John Long Jackson, D. D., as Bish- 
op of Louisiana in Christ Church Cathedral 

New Orleans, 11:00 A. M. 
5 — Baccalaureate Sermon, Morehead City School 

11:00 A.M. 

St. Cyprian's Church, New Bern, 8:00 P. M. 
12— St. James, Belhaven, 11:00 A. M. 

St. Mary's, Belhaven, 3:00 P. M. 

St. Matthew's, Yeatesville, 4:30 P. M. 

St. Paul's, Washington, 8:00 P. M. 
19 — Holy Innocents', Lenoir County, 11:00 A. M. 

Grace Church, Trenton, 3:30 P. M. 
21 — Ordination of Charles M. Johnson and V. 

Earl / rtis to the Diaconate in St. Cyprian's 

Church, New Bern, 11 A. M. 
24— Pari h Dinner meeting, St. Paul's, Edenton, 

6:30 P. M. 
26— Holy Trinity, Hertford, 11:00 A. M. 

Community Hall, Mege, 3:30 P. M. 

St. Paul's Edenton, 8:00 P. M. 



REV. J. LEON MALONE ATTENDING 
COLLEGE OF PREACHERS 



The Rev. J. Leon Malone is attending the Col- 
lege of Preachers in Washington, D. C. He will 
be away about a week. Mr. Malone is Rector 
of St. Philip's, Southport, and Minister-fn-Charge 
of St. Andrew's, Wrightsville ; St. Mary's, Bur- 
gaw; St. Gabriel's, Faison ; All Souls', North 
West and the Missions along the Inland Water- 
way. 



APRIL, 1940 



WOMEN ARE GUESTS OF MEN AT MEETING 

OF MEN'S CLUB OF GRACE CHURCH, 

PLYMOUTH 



HOLY INNOCENTS', SEVEN SPRINGS 



At a very interesting meeting of the Men's 
Club of Grace Church, Plymouth, on the even- 
ing of April 8th, many of the women of the 
parish were guests of the members of the Club 
at a supper, which was served by one of the 
women's organizations of the Church. 

The meeting was attended by a large number 
of men and the reports which were presented and 
discussed showed that the men as a whole are 
taking part in the work of the Club. 

The President of the Club is also teacher of 
the Men's Bible Class in the Church School. 
Many of the members of the Club became inter- 
ested in the work of the Church as members of 
the Bible Class before the Club was organized. 
Both the Club and Bible Class are well attended 
by the men of the Parish. 

Many people have moved to Plymouth during 
the past few years, and through these organiza- 
tions of men the Church is touching their lives 
in a very real way. There are enough men who 
are members of the Club and the Bible Class to 
make Grace Church, Plymouth, one of our strong 
self-sustaining parishes in a few years and they 
seem to be ready and anxious to cooperate in 
every way. 

The Rev. Sidney E. Matthews is Rector of the 
Parish. 



WHITEVILLE, GRACE CHURCH 



During Lent the members of Grace Church 
Auxiliary met every Thursday night, using as 
their study the book "Through Tragedy to Tri- 
umph", and for their special Lenten box work, sew- 
ing for the Good Shepherd Hospital in New Bern. 
Different members took chapters and gave talks 
on it. 

The work and meetings proved so interesting 
that we decided to continue our weekly meetings. 
We are now studying "The Half Hour Papers," 
and making scrap books to be placed in the Co- 
lumbus County Hospital, which has been com- 
pleted. The meetings have been held and are 
still being held in homes of the members. We 
think that gives them an informal air, and makes 
them more interesting. Light refreshments are 
served by the hostess. 

These Lenten meetings have created a new in- 
terest among the members and one we hope will 
be continued. 



A most interesting meeting of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of Holy Innocents' Church, Seven 
Springs, was held on March 16 in the home of 
Mr. James Williams. Nearly 100 per cent of its 
members were present, and much business was 
transacted. 

We used the Auxiliary Packet for our program, 
following up the collects and other selected arti- 
cles in the Prayer Book. Supplies which were 
made to order by the members, were brought and 
packed, ready to be sent to the Good Shepherd 
Hospital in New Bern. 

We hope to have a very happy Easter, as the 
day falls this time on our regular Church Sun- 
day, when the Rev. Mr. Rountree will bring us 
the message about our Risen Lord. 

MRS. KLEBER CROOM, Publicity Chairman. 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLDSBORO 



The recent Lenten season was filled with much 
interest and activity by the members of St. Ste- 
phen's Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary. On 
February 9th, the World Day of Prayer Service, 
was held in our Church with the Rev. John Grain- 
ger in charge of the service, and a choir made up 
of voices from the choirs of several Churches. 
The study of Christ in the World Communities 
based on the book "Through Tragedy to Triumph" 
by Basil Matthews was presented in three parts 
at the regular February and March meetings and 
at a special Lenten meeting on February 26th. 
These reviews were given by Mrs. H. C. Selby, 
Miss Mary Moore and Mrs. M. R. Doggett. A 
member of our Auxiliary, Mrs. H. F. Lee, is serv- 
ing on the Local Red Cross Production Commit- 
tee, knitting and sewing for Finnish children and 
wounded persons. Her group has completed a 
dozen dresses for twelve year old girls. The needs 
.of the Good Shepherd Hospital for the Colored 
in New Bern was presented to us as a special 
Easter project and each of the four Guilds that 
compose our Auxiliary made and donated sup- 
plies for a box that was carried down by our sup- 
ply chairman, Mrs. R. C. Mullin. Also we have re- 
cently sent two boxes to the mission at Tar Land- 
ing, and provided for the two children at the 
Thompson Orphanage who are our charges. As 
a fitting end to such busy and inspiring days, the 
members of St. Mary's Guild served a Parish 
breakfast immediately following the early ser- 
vice Easter morning to all who had attended, hav- 
ing as their guests at this time more than 80 per- 
sons. 

MRS. JAMES BELOTE, Secretary. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



At the meeting of the Executive Council in 
January it was decided to have a meeting in 
the spring. This meeting has been called for 
Thursday, April 25th, in St. Mary's Parish House, 
Kinston. Some of the departments of the Ex- 
ecutive Council will meet on the evening of April 
24th. 

The members of the Executive Council are: 
Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., and Rev. W. 
R. Noe, Members Ex-officio. 

For one year: Rev. Mortimer Glover, Wil- 
mington; Rev. Alexander Miller, Wilmington; 
Mr. W. B. Campbell, Wilmington; Mr. C. R. 
Wheatly, Beaufort; Mrs. Louis J. Poisson, Wil- 
mington. 

For two years: Rev. E. F. Moseley, Kinston; 
Rev. J. R. Rountree, Kinston ; Major J. S. Huske, 
Fayetteville ; Mr. George B. Elliott, Wilmington; 
Mrs. W. 0. S. Sutherland, Wilmington. 

For three years: Rev. C. E. Williams, New 
Bern; Rev. J. R. Tolar, Fayetteville; Mr. W. G. 
Gaither, Elizabeth City; Mr. J. A. Moore, Eden- 
ton; Mrs. H. G. Walker, Washington. 



APRIL CLERGY CONFERENCE 



Another high light in the spiritual fellowship 
of the Clergy in the Diocese of East Carolina, 
was reached on Tuesday, April 2nd, when sixteen 
of the Clergy met in St. Paul's, Greenville, for 
worship, meditation and consideration of their 
high calling. 

The Rev. Stephen Gardner celebrated the Holy 
Communion at 10:45 and the Rev. Jack Rountree, 
as Chairman of the Department of Evangelism, 
introduced the theme for discussion, "The Clergy- 
man in his Relation to the Community." 

Rev. W. Tate Young presented a deeply sugges- 
tive meditation upon the community as the fel- 
lowship of the Christians. It is this community 
which makes its impact upon society, and must 
be preserved from corrupting influences, even as 
it develops its power of influencing and uplifting 
the community. The first task of the clergyman 
is in relation to the fellowship and in fostering 
its true Christian spirit. For through the Church 
Christ expects to save the world. It was a deeply 
searching analysis of the clergyman's responsi- 
bilities and relationship to the Church as its 
leader and pastor that Mr. Young presented in an 
appealing and inspiring manner. 

Noonday prayers were beautifully read by the 
Rev. Sidney Matthews. 



The application of the principles involved in the 
spiritual service of the clergyman in dealing with 
the community as it reaches out into the general 
community was discussed by the Rev. John W. 
Hardy in a very suggestive and heart searching 
manner. He discussed our responsibility in meet- 
ing co-operative activities with the various de- 
nominations, our attitude toward social, political 
and economic questions, and by a series of ques- 
tions forced one to think, and examine himself. 
It was an excellently presented discussion, fol- 
lowed by a season of spiritual uplift in well se- 
lected prayers. 

Bishop Darst closed the Conference with an ap- 
preciative expression of the worth of the service 
and its inspiration to him. He also insisted that 
in re-relating ourselves to the deeper things of 
our calling, a drawing closer to God, we would be 
led into a true forward movement in presenting 
the gospel in all its winsome appeal. 

Luncheon was served in the Parish House. The 
next and closing Conference for the Spring will 
be held May 7th, in Goldsboro. 

JACK R. ROUNTREE. 



KANUGA CONFERENCES 



Six miles From Hendersonville, N. C, Conference 
Center of The Episcopal Church 



11)40 Conference Schedule 

Retreat for Women, June 10-13, Cost $5.25. 

Junior Conference, June 15-28, Cost $19.25. 

Young People's Conference, June 29-July 12, 
Cost $21.25. 

Midget Camp, July 13-27, Cost $17.25. 

Adult Conference, July 13-27, Cost, $28.25, 
$24.25. 

College Conference, July 13-27, Cost $28.25, 
$24.25. 

Laymen's Conference, July 26-28, Cost $4.25. 

Clergy School, July 15-27, Cost $23.25, $14.25. 

Guest Period, July 27-September 3. 

Inn, with annexes connected by covered way, 
and 39 cottages, central dining room in Inn. 

Beautiful lake, pavilion, tennis courts, riding 
hor^e:;, golf course. The ideal spot for a vaca- 
tion. 

Also boys' camp in connection with the Guest 
Period, i/t mile from Inn, August 3-31, Cost, 
$75.00. 

For further information write the Rev. A. Ru- 
fus Morgan, Wheat and Holly Streets, Columbia, 
S. C. (After June 10, address Kanuga Lake, Hen- 
dersonville, N. C.) 



APRIL, 1940 



MRS. ASHLEY T. ST.AMAND AWARDED 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY SCHOLARSHIP TO 

KANUGA SUMMER CONFERENCE 



The first Diocesan Scholarship Contest spon- 
sored by the Woman's Auxiliary of the Diocese 
of East Carolina, closed on March 15th, last. 
Several splendid essays on the subject "Evangel- 
ism First — Why?" were sent in and many 
women throughout the Diocese showed their in- 
terest. 

Papers were sent in from St. John's Church, 
Wilmington; St. Paul's Church, Wilmington; 
Christ Church, Hope Mills and from the Student 
Auxiliary of East Carolina Teachers College. In- 
quiries relative to the Contest were sent in from 
several other Parishes in the Diocese. 

The purpose of the Contest was two-fold — 
namely, study and training. The award for the 
best essay submitted is a two-weeks scholarship 
to the Adult Conference at Kanuga Lake, Hen- 
dersonville, N. C, and this award has been given 
to Mrs. Ashley T. St.Amand of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Wil- 
mington. Mrs. St. Amand's paper will be pub- 
lished elsewhere in this issue. 

The second best paper was sent in by Mrs. 
Linwood D. Latta, also of the Woman's Auxil- 
iary of St. Paul's Church, Wilmington, and third 
place was given Miss Julia Clyde Stone of Christ 
Church, Hope Mills, N. C. We hope to publish 
Mrs. Latta's paper and that of Miss Stone in a 
subsequent issue of The Mission Herald. 

It is interesting to note that two papers were 
entered by Students of East Carolina Teachers 
College. 

The Contest was conducted by the Field De- 
partment of the Woman's Auxiliary in the Dio- 
cese and the judges were the Rev. Jack R. Roun- 
tree, Chairman of the Commission on Evangel- 
ism and the Rev. E. F. Moseley, Chairman of the 
Diocesan Department of Christian Education, 
both of Kinston, N. C. 



EVANGELISM FIRST — WHY? 



Mrs. Ashley T. St.Amand 

People constantly refer to the world today as 
war-torn and weary, and then ask what can be 
done to relieve conditions that mankind may 
dwell in peace and happiness. Why is the world 
so weary? The fact that there are three full- 



size wars now in progress in Europe and Asia, 
rumors of wars, greed and injustice, compels one 
to acknowledge that the world is probably in 
the most hopeless condition since the advent of 
the Christian area. Racial and national hatreds, 
greed and injustice never have bred a happy 
people and never will breed one. One man as 
supreme giving no allegiance to a person or thing 
higher than himself will not promote happiness. 
Neither will a state or nation as supreme make for 
contentment. There must be one mightier than 
man, in whom he can trust and look to for strength 
and wisdom. There is only One — even God — 
who can give man strength and power to de- 
termine the right from the wrong, to give joy 
instead of fear. 

All the world needs to know God, His power 
and grace. But "How then shall they call on 
Him in whom they have not believed? And how 
shall they believe in Him of whom they have not 
heard? i*nd how shall they hear without a 
preacher?" Thinking people claim the Church 
must again "turn the world upside down". The 
Church must bestir herself to relieve the suf- 
fering plight of mankind. Apathy must give 
way to zeal and enthusiasm. Why should the 
Church receive special consideration from God 
if she fails to be a driving force in the world? 

The Church must again evangelize the world. 
Evangelism is zeal in spreading the gospel, or 
bringing Good News. True evangelism presents 
Jesus Christ to the world in such a way that 
men put their trust in God through Him. Evan- 
gelism includes a program in serving mankind. 
Why should Evangelism come first? Because suf- 
fering mankind needs it and because the Church 
needs it to save her soul. How else are these 
people to know about Him and to believe in Him 
unless they be told? 

In the past the growth of the Church has 
been due more to witnessing than to preaching. 
The early Christians knew this and they made 
the first Christian era an evangelical era until 
the whole world of that day had become Chris- 
tian. The Church must again discover ways and 
means to fulfill her responsibilities for world 
evangelism. She must never slacken in fervor 
for the task is just beginning; every Christian 
must learn to be a witness to grow materially 
and spiritually. She must not fail her purpose 
to win the world. 

Why should large numbers of people ask in 
vain for Christian leadership, while those who are 
qualified to help them are busy elsewhere? "The 
harvest truly is plenteous, but the laborers are 
few." In Nigeria it is estimated that 90 per 
?ent of the converts has been due to the witness 



8 



THE MISSION HERALD 



of African Christians themselves. The call of 
Christ comes to every Christian. God is surely 
calling His Church to March Forward today as 
with the early Christians who went everywhere 
preaching. There is no time for delay ; she must 
go forward to reopen doors which are closing to 
Christians, and to open new doors. World peace 
and happiness can be achieved only through world 
evangelism. 

The Great Commission 

World Evangelism is the God-given task of the 
Church. Her authority for going into all the 
world is Christ Himself. "Go ye into all the 
world." "Preach the gospel." "As my Father 
hath sent me, even so send I you." "I am the 
vine, ye are the branches." "Bear much fruit." 
To emphasize that command, He said, "If a man 
love me, he will keep my word." Again, "Ye 
are my friends if ye do the things which I com- 
mand you." 

The Good Samaritan said, "Take care of him." 
Christ directs the Church to take care of them. 
Material aid? Yes. But Christ means so much 
more than that. He means to bind the wounded 
heart, to pour on the oil of comfort, to feed the 
hungering soul with the Bread of Heaven and to 
refresh that soul with the water of Everlasting 
life. 

And then, there is the comforting and strength- 
ening thought that He will be with us always. 
No wonder the Apostles were not afraid to preach 
the Good News of Christ crucified. With God's 
presence abiding in them they went to the 
whole world to live that life gloriously confident 
in the knowledge of the Living Christ. Suf- 
ferings, pain, martyrdom could not stop it in 
its growth. 

Evangelism takes everything we have in us 
to lift the burdens of an unhappy world and to 
bring Light out of Darkness. It cost our Saviour 
everything He had, it cost the early Christians 
just as much but again and again St. Paul says 
he thanks God for the privilege of suffering for 
His sake. We may not be asked to suffer pain 
and death, but there is such a thing as spiritual 
death from hopelessness and despair while the 
body lives. Christ says, "Go". "Seek the lost." 
"I will be with you always, even unto the end 
of the world." 

The Faith Which Evangelism Supports 

The early Christians held fast to the Hope 
of Eternal Life and of the Kingdom of God. They 
taught love for all mankind. That with God 
there were no racial or national boundaries. 
Jesus was described as a Person who had a unique 



power and whose purpose was to save all men; 
as the Spirit of the Living God which proceeds 
from Him and the Father, and who gives life 
to His Church. The early Church taught that 
Christ is the head ; The Church the body ; and we 
the living members of the body. St. Paul says we 
are members of one body in Christ, each mem- 
ber having different functions of that body, but 
members one with another. In fact, through 
all his letters permeates this same idea of One- 
ness with Christ and fellowship one with the 
other. 

The Church teaches the God-head made man, 
that man might behold the redemptive love of 
God for him and his needs. "God so loved the 
world that He gave His only Begotten Son that 
whosoever believeth in Him should not perish 
but have everlasting life." In the Creeds Christ 
is described as "Judge of the living and the 
dead" as "sitting at God's right hand", as "giver 
of the Spirit and the fulfiller of all the promises 
of God." The message is still "One Lord, One 
Faith, One God and Father of all." 

Our Catechism says that in baptism we are 
made "members of Christ" so that we may be 
used as channels through which the body of 
Christ can grow and live. If we are members 
of Christ, we are children of God. As Children 
of God we must obey the command to love one- 
another and "to go," "to seek." The Church must 
win souls, else disobey His marching orders. We 
must incorporate ourselves in the same spirit 
with Christ that we may know what He wants 
us to do and that our spiritual life may be nour- 
ished in the oneness with Him, "Which draws all 
men unto Him." The complete life of the Church 
is an evangelistic life. 

The Need For Christian Witnessing 

The Church must evangelize to Advance. If 
she does not Advance on the Christian March 
into all the world she will retreat until she has 
lost her purpose for being. History has taught 
us that preaching the gospel is the way in which 
she grew. When that purpose was lost in the 
past her work was hindered but when once more 
it was put into practice the Church prospered. 
Whenever these truths are alive in the hearts 
of believers, the outcome is a victorious Christ 
and a growing Church. Whenever they are ig- 
nored, or doubted, or denied, the Advance of 
Christ's cause falters, or slackens, or ceases al- 
together. 

There are great areas which need to be evan- 
gelized anew; and still greater areas where the 
gospel is unknown. This task will never be 
accomplished without sacrifice. The Church 



APRIL, 1940 



must make its influence felt in winning souls for 
Christ, lest the spiritual life of the Church be 
slowly snuffed out. 

Miss Upton, who has spent many years in 
Japan, says, "If one million missionaries had 
been sent to the Orient there would not be one 
million Japanese soldiers in China today." Evan- 
gelism first? It is necessary that kindred na- 
tions may become brothers. Outstanding is the 
example of Christian Chinese and Christian Jap- 
anese thinking and working side by side in the 
Madras Conference. Love of God makes men 
brothers of kindred thoughts and kindred hearts. 

"In Europe and America alone there are 240 
million people unchurched." Christians in Rus- 
sia hide in darkness to hear the word of God. 
"Many countries are entirely closed to Christi- 
anity; other countries are gradually closing their 
gates; 45 per cent of China is still untouched. 
In India there are 14 protestant missionaries 
and 7,000 Christians to a million people; other 
countries are scarcely touched." Some heathen 
religions are slowly, but surely, taking on prac- 
tices of the Christian Church without the spirit 
of Christ; there is more organized opposition to 
the Christian Church today than at any time 
in the past 100 years; nations are seeking sub- 
stitutes for God; there are more non-Christians 
in the world now than ten years ago; the re- 
sources in missionaries and funds are dwin- 
dling. 

The Son of Man is the way by which people 
find God. He is the truth which teaches men 
how to live in peace and happiness. He is the 
life for the man of today and the man of to- 
morrow. He is life Everlasting. He alone can 
fill the great need of the world. Therefore, the 
Church must "Lift Him up from the earth that 
all men may be drawn to Him." 

The Kingdom of God 

Mankind has one source from which to find 
courage and wisdom to meet the world prob- 
lems and that source is God. God holds out this 
wisdom and power through the Church to all be- 
lievers. The Church looks to the Kingdom of 
God for advancement. It was Jesus' answer to 
the world's ills ; it was the answer of the first 
Christians ; it is the answer of the Church today. 
The Church must reach out with the mind and 
heart of Christ to meet these problems. When 
war and fear are dispersed with Christians' wea- 
pons of overcoming evil with good, hate with 
love, and the world with the Cross, then, and only 
then, will the Kingdom of God be in earth in 
the fullness of its glory and power. 

"Our bodies are the temples of God." Then, 



the Kingdom of God dwells within us. The 
Church must send out her messengers — King- 
dom of God messengers- — that all men everywhere 
should know Him. "As my Father hath sent 
me, even so send I you." 

And finally, God has given His Holy Spirit 
with His manifold gifts of grace to comfort and 
strengthen man in his task. The spirit of wis- 
dom and understanding for Truth; the spirit of 
counsel and ghostly strength for courage; the 
spirit of knowledge and true godliness for con- 
secrated guidance; the spirit of His Holy Fear 
in loving obedience to His will. 

"My peace I give unto you." The comfort- 
ing spirit of God is always found blessing His 
people who call upon Him. That God's presence 
may bless His people the Church must promote 
evangelism — preaching and living God's Word 
— not just to save or to bring Light from Dark- 
ness, but to enrich and bless her life in the full- 
ness of God's love. 

Bibliography 

The Half Hour Series — Forward Movement 
Commission. 

"The World Mission of the Church." 

Through Tragedy to Triumph. 

Forth. 

Doctrines and Teachings of the Church by Rev. 
Wm. Walter Smith. 

Catechism. 

Office of Confirmation. 

Creeds. 

Gospel of St. Matthew. 

Gospel of St. Luke 

Gospel of St. John 

The Book of the Acts of the Apostles. 

Epistle to the Romans. 

Epistles to the Corinthians. 

Epistle to the Ephesians. 



GIFT TO CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN 



A most unusual gift has been given to Christ 
Church, New Bern, by Miss Margaret Shepard 
Bryan. It is a scrap book containing pen and 
ink sketches of the two past and the present 
churches and a list of all the memorials in the 
Church, by whom given and to whom remem- 
bered, with the inscription on each. Many graves 
in the Church yard are listed. With this book, 
one could make a most comprehensive tour of old 
Christ Church. 

This worthwhile gift is much appreciated. 



IJoung People's Seruice League 



By Mary D. Home, Publicity Chairman 



A LETTER FOR YA' 



NOTES ABOUT CONVOCATION MEETING 



Dear Leaguers: 

Well, since Spring is here and Summer is just 
around the corner all the young folks I know have 
started talking about Camp Leach. The other 
day I received a poem from Good Shepherd, Wil- 
mington, written by someone who signs himself 
or herself "Robbie". And I'm passing it on to 
you. 

When I was a youngster three or four, 
I used to repeat this rhyme o'er and o'er: 
"I am counting each day on my fingers and thumbs 
"The hours that must pass before Santa Claus 
comes." 

But now this is the little rhyme I say 

Over and over every single day : 

"I am counting each week on my fingers and 

thumbs. 
The days that must pass before Camp time comes." 

"ROBBIE." 

And, confidentially, I'm doing the same thing, 
so I know just how "Robbie" feels. 

I hear that the Wilmington Convocation had 
one grand time March 31 at their meeting in 
Wilmington. Gosh! I sure wish I could have 
been there. It sounded grand to me. Incidental- 
ly, Hallie, I wasn't being snooty — I just couldn't 
make it. 

Speaking of Convocations — the Edenton Con- 
vocation will have its Spring Meeting on April 
28th in Elizabeth City. We're expecting to see a 
big crowd, so everybody come on and make plans 
to be there. The Bishop is going, and well — just 
everybody. 

Say, did you hear the one about the Irishman 
and the gulls ? Well, some gulls were following a 
boat and an Irish passenger says : " 'Tis a fine flock 
of pigeons that's following this boat." A fel- 
low passenger says, "Oh, they're gulls." The 
Irishman replied : "Well girls or boys they're still 
a fine flock of pigeons." 

After a joke (?) like that I guess the safest 
thing for me to do is to say so long till Conven- 
tion time — and then I'll be seeing you when all 
God's chilluns go home to Camp Leach. 

So till then, 

MARY. 



To all those who are planning to attend the 
meeting of the Edenton Convocation in Eliza- 
beth City on April 28th, Hampton Noe, Presi- 
dent, wishes to remind you of the following things : 

(1) Bishop's Sermon at 11:00. 

(2) Lunch at 1:30 — and don't forget to bring 



it. 



(3) 

(4) 



Business session at 2:30. 

And be there on time. 
So please everybody try real hard to come and 
don't forget the times mentioned above and we'll 
be seeing you on the 28th of April. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMINGTON 



The Good Shepherd Senior League has been 
busy during the past month getting ready to 
enter the Lenten Season. We presented a play at 
the beginning of the month which told of a Seeker 
who had lost her way and was finally put on the 
path to God by a Teacher. Thelma Mintz took the 
part as Seeker, and Betty Hewlett the Teacher. 

Recently the League has been studying the 
prescribed course of study for Lent on the Or- 
dained Sacraments of the Church. The programs 
have been made interesting by the faithful work 
of Miss Robertson; and we have studied about 
Baptism and Holy Communion. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THELMA MINTZ, Diocesan Representative. 



ST. PETER'S, WASHINGTON 



In February we had a bridge and bingo party 
in the Parish House. The social end was a big 
success and though the receipts were not large, 
everything was clear as the refreshments were 
donated by each Leaguer. 

We tried pantomiming parables for one of our 
programs and fourd it very interesting. The 
League was divided into two groups or teams — 
each team selecting secretly a parable to panto- 
mime. / fter the pantomiming the opposite team 
guessed what the parable was. We then discuss- 
ed the lesson the parable taught. 

We served a supper to the Rotary Club in 
March. This proved to be a big success and 
helped our treasury considerably. 



APRIL, 1940 



11 



We plan to have a large delegation at the Eden- 
ton Convocation when it meets in Elizabeth City 
and hope to see all of you there. 

For Easter we helped the Church School with 
the mite boxes and made up an Easter basket of 
food for a needy family. 

So long, and we'll be seeing you in Elizabeth 
City before long. 

St. Peter's League, Washington, N. C. 

HELEN KIZER, Reporter. 



CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN 



Our League feels awfully bad for not having 
sent in any articles this year, but we have had a 
lot of trouble getting started. Recently we reor- 
ganized and asked Mr. Henry Whitehurst to be 
our new advisor. We have had three different 
speakers each month who have added a great 
deal to our meetings, and everyone felt that they 
had done more than their share in preparing the 
programs, so all of us members decided to buckle 
down and try to help them as much as we could. 
Only one supper meeting has been held, but we 
ho^e to have more, because they always seem to 
boost our attendance. Sunday morning, March 
3, we had a Corporate Communion at the 11:00 
o'clock service with nearly all of our members 
present. 

All the Leaguers feel that our organization is 
ou to a new start, and with our new advisor who 
has tal en such a vital interest, we feel sure that 
we can make this year one of the best in the 
League's history. 

SOPHIA SUE DUFFY, Reporter. 



ST. JAMES', WILMINGTON 



Have you ever been to Calabash ? We have and 
so we can tell you first hand that if you want to 
have a grand time you must plan a trip to our 
"Youngest League." Let me tell you about ours. 

It was on the sixteenth of February — I don't 
think anyone will forget — and we had been talk- 
ing about going for ages. We felt that we al- 
ready knew the welcoming committee (members 
of the Calabash Y. P. S. L. ages 6 to 60) for hav- 
ing heard so much about them. Miss McMurray 
with her contagious enthusiasm, soon had every 
one (again 6-60) dashing through "Three Deep", 
"Fox-a-Goose-a-Gander" and many other games 
that we in all our sophistication had quite forgot- 
ten. One young Calabasher, Bull Dog by name, 
crawled under the house to escape "the fox" and 
it took both Leagues to pull him out. Happily, 
supper was then announced and well we kinda 
forgot our manners in getting there. A glorious 



fish fry, it was, all dressed up with candles, mu- 
sic and entertainment and carried out by all mem- 
bers of Calabash, who due to the narrow age limit 
(yes, 6-60) were either too old or too young to 
join in the more strenuous activity. 

They closed with a meeting of Y. P. S. L. The 
program, consisting of singing, recitation, discus- 
sion and worship, was intended to show the many 
opportunities everywhere of serving God. Fel- 
lowship with Christ throughout the world — we 
understand it better today. 

Incidentally, this isn't the start of all we could 
tell you about Calabash. We're holding out on 
the rest so that you can go and find out for your- 
selves. Just tell J. L. Bennett that you're friends 
of ours ! 

Submitted by 

HALLIE TOWNES. 



ST. PAUL'S, GREENVILLE 



Our Y. P. S. L. has been studying the Lenten 
book and find it very interesting. We have had 
outsiders who are thoroughly familiar with the 
"Christian Sacraments" to give their view point 
on the various chapters in this book. We con- 
tributed to a Relief Fund here in Greenville to 
provide lunches for some school children. 

On March 31, 1940, we went to visit the Wash- 
ington League. We had a very nice visit and 
everyone enjoyed the meeting very much. We 
hope they will come and see us soon. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET JONES. 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLDSBORO 



St. Stephen's, Goldsboro, has just finished a 
most interesting series of programs under the pre- 
scribed Lenten Study Course. These programs took 
the form of weekly lectures by our Rector. Every 
one gained a deeper appreciation of our Church 
through knowledge gained from these talks. In 
addition to this special Lenten program we con- 
tinued our regular services, especially in the field 
of Parish service. 

I might add that we have paid in full our Dio- 
cesan apportionment. 

Our League wishes to serve notice of warning 
to all contenders for the Bishop's Shield. As 
we have already gone beyond the required amounts 
in the five fields of service, we feel that we have 
a chance. If we don't get it we intend to give 
some one a "run for their money." So all you 
ambitious Leagues and Leaguers, beware ! 

Reported by 

GEORGE STENHOUSE. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ST. JOHNS YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICE 
LEAGUE, WILMINGTON, N. C. 



St. John's has a very active Service League. 
The attendance at the meetings is good and the 
programs are interesting and instructive. The 
social part of our gatherings is a decided feature, 
especially the fellowship. We have a group of 
young people who are congenial and love to be 
together. Many friendships and even weddings 
have resulted from our meeting together. Three 
of our most active members have gotten married 
and because of these weddings we have to change 
Presidents several times during the year. 

It seems that after attending the Convocational 
meeting March 31st and hearing the wonderful 
quiz by Miss Belle Ray Tillinghast and others on 
Camp Leach, there is increasing interest both in 
our League work and Camp Leach on the part of 
our members. 

Our League has just finished the Study Course 
for Young People. Some of the things most out- 
standing in the Course were the Holy Commun- 
ion, Holy Baptism, Confirmation and Holy Ma- 
trimony. It was a Lenten Course on the Sacra- 
ments of the Church. The discussions were led 
by Walter Noe, and the League members joined 
heartily and enthusiastically in the discussions. 
It was an unusually interesting course and we feel 
that it has given us a clearer understanding of 
the Sacramental life of the Church. We shall look 
forward with a great deal of pleasure to next 
Lent when there will be another opportunity to 
learn more of the Church's teachings and ways. 

SECRETARY. 



CAMP LEACH PLANS 



Plans have now been made for the various 
camps at Camp Leach for the 1940 season. The 
first thing will be the Annual Convention of the 
Young People's Service League, which will be 
June 14-16. The League of St. John's, Wilming- 
ton, will be the host League. 

The Senior Camp will be in charge of the 
Rev. Mortimer Glover, the Rector of St. James', 
Wilmington. He will be assisted by the Rev. 
John Grainger of Goldsboro. The date of this 
camp is June 17-30. 

There will be an experiement with the Junior 
Camp this season. For the first time the boys 
and girls will be in camp together, as at the other 



camps. Rev. and Mrs. E. F. Moseley of Kinston, 
assisted by the Rev. Harry Jackson, of Ayden, 
will have charge of this camp, the date being 
July 1-14. 

Another change will be made in the midget 
camp this year. Previously there has been on- 
ly one midget camp. This year there will be 
two midget camps and perhaps there will be 
accommodation for a number of the first camp to 
stay for the second. The two midget camps are 
to be held July 15-21 and July 22-28. Rev. and 
Mrs. John Hardy of Williamston will be in charge. 

Thus all the camps will have been completed 
by the last week in July, and following the camps 
above mentioned there will be an adult camp 
conducted jointly by the Woman's Auxiliary and 
the Department of Religious Education. This 
is to be a training school for Auxiliary and 
Church School workers. It is hoped that this 
week can be given for a small cost, six dollars 
for the time from Monday noon, July 28, to Sat- 
urday noon, August 3. 

Camp Leach is a great institution and it is 
hoped that every parish and mission will feel 
its share in the work that is being done. You are 
urged now to make plans for these various camps 
and conferences. Do not leave the responsibil- 
ity of these camps up to the Directors. This is 
a Diocesan Camp. 



REV. MORTIMER GLOVER WILL BE DIREC- 
TOR OF SENIOR CAMP 



The Rev. Mortimer Glover, Rector of St. James', 
Wilmington, has accepted the appointment as 
Director of the Senior Camp. This camp will 
be held in June at Camp Leach near Washington, 
N. C, and it is hoped that at least 100 young 
people will attend. Please look for announce- 
ment of dates and other details. 



DOUGLAS DOWDY IS AT EAST CAROLINA 
TEACHERS' COLLEGE 



Instead of returning to DuBose School, Mont- 
eagle, Tennessee, Douglas Dowdy has decided 
to complete his academic work at East Carolina 
Teachers College, Greenville. Mr. Dowdy held 
lay services at Clinton and Faison during the 
winter months. 



APRIL, 1940 



13 



PRESIDING BISHOP'S DAY WILL START 

GREAT UNITED EFFORT OF CHURCH'S 

FALL CAMPAIGN 



Canvass Dates to be November 10th to 24th 



Name Parish Chairmen 

A great united effort through the Every Mem- 
ber Canvass this fall is the hope expressed by 
the Presiding Bishop and National Council. The 
period between November 10 to 24 has been set 
for the 1940 Canvass. Mark these dates on your 
calendar and start planning now for an effective 
thorough canvass in your parish. 

The Canvass will open with Presiding Bishop's 
Day, on November 10, when the Presiding Bishop 
will deliver a message to the whole Church over 
a nation-wide radio hookup. Last fall, Bishop 
Tucker had what was generally declared to be 
the largest audience for an Episcopal Church 



broadcast. Many parishes installed loud speakers 
in parish houses to hear him. 

The Presiding Bishop plans to send a letter to 
every Rector about his part in the Canvass. He 
also hopes to write each parish Canvass Chair- 
man and to this end, requests that such Chair- 
men be named immediately and their names cer- 
tified to him, either through the Diocesan Chair- 

"General Convention year offers an unusual 
opportunity for an effective Canvass," says Bish- 
op Tucker- "I, therefore, am hopeful that each 
parish in the Church will begin this spring to make 
careful plans for the fall season." 

It is further the Presiding Bishop's hope that 
this fall will see started a great advance move- 
ment which will give enlarged scope and vitality 
to the Church's work in Parish, in Diocese, in 
Nation, and in the World. 

Write the Presiding Bishop and tell him of your 
plans, 
man or direct. 




CHURCH REACHES ISOLATED 
VIA POST 



Baby Clinic conducted with cooperation of State Board of 
Health, St. Luke's Mission, Tanner's Ridge, Virginia — one of 
the Church's many successful centers of work among Southern 

Mountaineers 



"The mother of four children wrote 
me, her letter reaching me just yester- 
day," writes Miss Agnes Hickson, ed- 
ucational missionary in North Dakota. 
"She lives many miles from an Epis- 
copal Church and is disturbed as to 
what to do about her children. She 
wants them to be confirmed, and they 
will be trained by correspondence, but 
how to make them really understand 
their Church and their relation to it 
when the only contact will be mail, ex- 
cept perhaps once a year ? Better teach- 
ing materials, closer ties with the near- 
est Church, more personal visits, more 
devotion by the workers — all these 
would help." 

Through the Church School by mail 
which she conducts, Miss Hickson 
touches 250 children, and she maintains 
a mail contact with more than 400 iso- 
lated families. Other "By Mail" or- 
ganizations are a Woman's Auxiliary 
branch and a Young People's Fellow- 
ship. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



WHY BISHOP WATSON BECAME AN 
EPISCOPALIAN 



February 29, 1940. 

Rev. F. B. Drane, 
Monroe, N. C. 

Dear Mr. Drane: 

In the early years of my ministry under the 
late Bishop Watson, I used to hear a story to the 
effect that in his early years he was employed 
by a Mr. Collins — Mr. Joshua Collins, I think, a 
large plantation owner in the neighborhood of 
St. James' Church, Scuppernong, near Creswell, 
as tutor for the Collins children. As I remember 
the story, Mr. Watson was a staunch Presbyter- 
ian, and being the strong character that he was, 
undertook to prove to Mr. Collins that the Epis- 
copalians were wrong and that Mr. Collins ought 
to join the Presbyterian Church. And to prove 
his point, Mr. Watson examined the available 
evidence with a view of presenting same to Mr. 
Collins, in proof of his (Mr. Watson's) contention. 
I was told that instead of converting Mr. Col- 
lins, Mr. Watson found the evidence in favor of 
the Episcopal Church, and was himself converted 
to it, joining the Church, later entering the min- 
istry, and finally becoming the first Bishop of 
East Carolina. Can you verify this story, or if 
erroneous, point out the errors? In the event 
that you cannot yourself do this, can you tell me 
somebody who might be able to do it ? It was my 
intention to write your father about this, but I 
waited too long, much to my regret. 

Thanking you for your interest in this matter, 
and hoping some day to have the pleasure of 
meeting you in person, I remain, 

Faithfully yours, 

WM. E. COX 



Monroe, N. C. 
March 10, 1940. 

My Dear Mr. Cox: 

Fred has turned over to me your letter asking 
about Bishop Watson's coming into the Episcopal 
Church through his association with the Collins 
family at Lake Scuppernong. The Josiah Collins 
whom you mentioned was my great-grandfather, 
and one of the little boys for whom Bishop Wat- 
son was tutor was my grand-father. 

I have checked with my aunts the following ver- 
sion of the story, which is the one I have heard 



many times, and they say it is correct, except they 
are not sure whether the Bishop was studying 
for the Presbyterian ministry or not. I have al- 
ways had the impression that he was. 

Mrs. Josiah Collins was raised a Presbyterian 
and joined the Episcopal Church when her first 
baby was baptized. Later when Mr. Watson was 
living in her house and teaching her children, she 
gave him a Book of Common Prayer one day and 
told him to keep it as long as he wished, and mark 
in it anything with which he di.Tered, and some 
day she would like to discuss with him the points 
on which they did not agree. After keeping it 
a very long time, Mr. Watson brought the book 
to Mrs. Collins and said: "Mrs. Collins, here is 
your book and you will not find a mark in it. There 
is nothing that I would want changed." The re- 
sult was that he joined the Episcopal Church and 
studied for the Episcopal ministry. 

I have heard this story many times, told by 
members of my family and others, and feel sure 
that it is approximately correct. So far as I 
know Mr. Collins did not come into the story. 

It has been so long since we met that you prob- 
ably won't remember it but I think we did dur- 
ing your earlier ministry. With best wishes, 

Sincerely, 

REBECCA WOOD DRANE. 



THE DIOCESAN DEBT 



Last Sunday Mr. J. A. Moore and myself told 
of the Diocesan Debt Campaign now on and end 
ing Whitsunday. Mr. Moore is a member of the 
finance committee of the Diocese whoce duty it 
is to raise this debt. Bishop Darst was conse- 
crated on January 6, 1915. On his 20th anniver- 
sary as Bishop in 1935 Diocese decided as mem- 
orial to him to pay off within five years the $23,000 
debt which Diocese had accumulated during the 
depression. Diocese fell down on this. St. Paul's 
and a few other parishes and missions did their 
full part, but most of them failed. Last Dio- 
cesan Convention, held in January 1940, passed a 
resolution calling for payment of balance of this 
debt by Whitsunday, May 12th, next. Debt Origi- 
nally $23,000; $2,000 spent on Bishop's house 
which was almost in unlivable condition ; we had a 
Dioceian deficit of $4,621 in 1939, due to certain 
parishes and missions failing to pay what promis- 
ed. We paid ours. These three items gave us $31, 
621 debt, repairs and deficit. During the five years 
$15,000 was paid on the debt, so that $16,121, or 
about that sum, is due now. There are 8,000 com- 
municants in the Diocese. The finance commit- 



APRIL, 1940 



15 



tee is asking that every communicant give $2.00 
by Whitsunday, which will wipe the debt out. 
Some can't give anything. Some can give more 
than $2.00. It will balance up. Bishop Darst 
wrote in The Mission Herald, "The debt while 
not large, is proving burdensome and I earnestly 
hope that we may have it out of the way by Whit- 
sunday so that we may go forward without strain 
to the accomplishment of the task committed 
to our hands." St. Paul's quota is $330.00. The 
vestry passed a resolution saying this will be 
paid. A canvass will soon be on to raise it. A 
member of the vestry will call on you, or you may 
hand to a vestryman your contribution. I have 
given many times my part on this debt, but I 
will most cheerfully respond again to relieve the 
Bishop of this burden. I hope you feel the same 
way. Our contributions to our Church are usual- 
ly small indeed compared to what we spend for 



luxuries, amusement, tobacco and so on. Get up 
your $2.00 or more by Whitsunday and let's make 
our quota. Don't have somebody else paying 
your share unless it is absolutely necessary. Two 
dollars for every confirmed person in St. Paul's 
is what it will be. — From weekly letter of the 
Rev. C. A. Ashby, of St. Paul's Church, Edenton, 
in the Chowan Herald. 



REV. ALEXANDER MILLER ABLE TO 
HOLD SERVICES 



For several Sundays, the Rev. Alexander Mil- 
ler, Rector of St. Paul's, Wilmington, who has 
been sick for several months, has taken part in 
the services at St. Paul's. It is hoped that he 
will soon be able to resume his full duties. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 
GENERAL CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1. 1940 TO DECEMBER 31. 1940 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 

Paid 

to 

April 18 

1940 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Clinton, St. Paul's 



$ 150.00 

75.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 563.28 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 254.54 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 32.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 450.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 15.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 433.75 

.ied Springs, St. Stephen's 10.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Soupthport, St. Philip's 80.70 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Whiteville, Grace Church 30.07 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 165.68 

Wumington, St. James' 3,430.77 

Wilmington, St. John's 840.04 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 155.00 



Organized Missions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Campbellton. St. Philip-Apostle 

Faison. St. Gabriel's 

North West, All Soul's 

Pikeville, St. George's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 



Paid 

io 

April 18 

1940 

5 2.00 

./ 20.00 

5.00 

5.00 



Unorganized Missions 

Calabash, St. Andrew's 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 
Tar Landing 



16.10 



10.58 
55.00 



Parishes 

Aurora, noly Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bain, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

pn..nerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Faimville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville St. Mary's 

GveenvilJt, St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake Landing, St. George's 

Flymouth, Grace Church 

Roper, St. Luke's 

Washington, St. Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseoh's 

New Bern St. Cyprian's 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 

Organized Missions 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 

Laento-i. St. John-Evangelist 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Kinston, ->t. Augustine's 

Washington, St. Paul's 



Total ? 6,799.51 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



27.31 



5.35 



400.00 
505.58 

17.00 

394.11 

3.61 

200.00 

31.65 

5.45 

90.00 

22.00 

643.81 
50.00 



Windsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton. St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 

Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Missions 

Avoca, Holy Innocents 

Parochial Missions 
Creswell, Galilee Mission - 

Total ? 2 



17.79 
62.50 



22.98 



19.00 
25.00 



45.00 
40.00 



2.00 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 

Unorganized Missions 



13.83 
131.00 



25.00 

8.00 

15.00 



Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Farmville, St. Timothy's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's ..... 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen s 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission ... 



630.15 



5.22 
9.00 



3.00 
3.50 



Total $ 213.55 

Grand Total $9,643.21 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



* 

i 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 

RECTOR 



I 

I 
*- 



THEY ARE ON SALE IN YOUR PARISH 

LARGE. ATTRACTIVE BOOKLETS 

Printed For the 

SILVER JUBILEE OF BISHOP DARST 

Entitled 

"BISHOP DARST AND EAST CAROLINA 

DURING THE PAST TWENTY-FIVE YEARS" 

Price 35 cents 

THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 

of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 

Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 

Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 

Wilmington, N. C. 






ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited Collate Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and ii. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences 
For Catalog, and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of East Carol'na 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
Wilmington, N. C. 



I 



McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 

Good =Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 88 12th & Market Sts. 

Wilmington, N. C. 



INVESTMENTS ! 



We are at all times ready to assist the in- 
vestors in North Carolina in the purchase or 
sale of any type security. 

We specialize in : 

NO^TH CAROLINA 

STATE, COUNTY AND CITY BONDS 

Local Preferred and Common Stocks 

Please communicate with us if we can be of 
service to you 



Oscar Burnett and Company 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Thomas C. Darst, Jr. Lloyd E. Canady 



LOUIE E, WOODBURY, Jr. 

INSURANCE 

815 Murchison Building 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Phone 84 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter 
continue her education in a Church school. 

MRS. ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, A. M. 
Presid?nt 

Saint Mary's offers the ]0th, 11th, and 12th grades 
of High School and 2 years College work. All acade- 
mic courses fully accredited by Southern Association. 
General charge $700 including ui lion in Art, Expres 
sion, Home Economics, Music. 

Gym and Field sports. Horseback Riding, Golf, 
Tennis, 20 acre campus and Tndoor Tiled Pool. 

Catalogue and Book of Views 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



+ 

i 
i 
i 
I 
i 



*— .. 






-o ..{» 



Jan 41 

Mint ;. 



"U N. C 
CAROLINA ROOIV 




THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 

Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Editor 

REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 

Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished o n application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 



CLERGY CONFERENCE 



By Jack R. Rountree 

The last of the Clergy Conferences for the sea- 
son was held Tuesday, May 7th, in St. Stephen's 
Church, Goldsboro. The attendance was consider- 
ably smaller than usual, but the meeting was in- 
teresting and helpful. It is the concensus of opinion 
of the clergy who have been attending the Con- 
ferences that they have been an inspiration and 
help in innumerable ways. Leaders of the re- 
ligious thought of the Diocese have been brought 
together to ponder and consider their mutual pro- 
blems and responsibilities; they have felt the 
strengthening influence of a conscious bond of 
fellowship in the cause of extending the Kingdom 
of God; they have experienced the pleasure of 
friendly intercourse and comeraderie of men en- 
gaged in spiritual enterprise; they have realized 
a oneness in working together for God ; and most 
of all they have acquired a deeper appreciation 
of their privileges and responsibilities as priests 
of the Church of God. They are working upon 
the foundations of that city whose builder and 
maker is God. They have been driven to their 
knees in deeper devotion, to their studies for 
fuller understanding of the Word of God, and out 
among people to be true shepherds of their 
flocks. So far as our information goes, no 
other Diocese has such a clergy group meeting 
in regular monthly sessions. 

Throughout the season the program has been 
the same. There has been a Corporate Com- 



munion, in which the clergy presented themselves 
in deep penitence and consecration before God; 
a quiet time of meditation and prayer; a well 
prepared and sincerely presented meditation upon 
the theme of the day, by one of the clergy; a 
period of prayer; then a discussion of the day's 
subject, led by one of the clergy, who had spent 
time and prayer in the preparation of the dis- 
cussion ; and the sessions were closed with a 
fellowship luncheon. To the writer it has seemed 
a spiritual uplift — a period of withdrawal from 
the stresses and strains of everyday, to be apart 
awhile with our brethren in the presence of the 
Master, on the mountain top of prayer and medi- 
tation. We cannot question that the value of the 
conferences will be permanent. The Department 
of Evangelism will resume the conferences in 
September. 



CLERGY AT GOLDSBORO 



A rather small number of the clergy attended 
the closing conference, which met May 7th, at 
Goldsboro, but the same spirit of devotion and 
fellowship in worship was present, and those who 
attended felt that they had been helped, as before. 

Holy Communion was celebrated by the Rev. 
John Grainger, the rector of St. Stephen's, and 
a period of mental prayer followed. 

The meditation was led by the Rev. Jack R. 
Rountree, who presented a paper upon "The 
Clergyman and his Bible" in which he maintained 
that there is need for the clergy to spend more 
time in a devotional study of the Scriptures 
that they might be the better able to feed the 
flock over which they are shepherds. He called 
attention to the fact that at his ordination the 
priest pledges himself to seek to feed the flock 
out of the rich treasures of the Word of God. 
He discussed the inherent value of the Scriptures 
and asserted that they are still the mine of 
spiritual instruction whose depth no one has ever 
fathomed. He insisted that, despite the changing 
conditions of the times, our new views of life and 
the latest researches in the field of biblical criti- 
cism, there is no philosophy or theology that has 
outmoded the deep truths of the Holy Bible. He 
appealed to the clergy to spend more time in 
poring over its pages and become familiar with 
its truth and beauty, as the way into the heart 
of God. 

The Rev. John R. Tolar led a season of prayer 
that was inspiring. 

The Rev. Mortimer Glover, of St. James', Wil- 
mington, then led the discussion of the minister's 
(Continued on Page 3) 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C, MAY, 1940 



NUMBER 5 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



In my letter last month I gave an account of 
my activities up to and including my visit to St. 
Thomas' Mission, Sladesville, on April the fif- 
teenth. 

On April the twentieth, at 11:00 A. M. I 
attended a meeting of the Directors and Business 
Manager of Camp Leach in Christ Church Parish 
House, New Bern, at which time plans were made 
for the coming summer. 

On the evening of the twentieth, assisted by 
the Rector, Rev. Charles E. Williams, I officiated 
at a wedding in Christ Church, New Bern. 

On Sunday, the twenty-first, at 11:00 A. M. I 
preached and confirmed fifteen persons present- 
ed by the Rev. Charles E. Williams in Christ 
Church, New Bern. 

In the afternoon I baptized an infant in St. 
John's Church, Wilmington and at night I attend- 
ed the seventy-fourth Anniversary Celebration 
of St. Mark's, Wilmington and enjoyed a beauti- 
ful musical program. 

On the evening of the twenty-fourth I attended 
a helpful and hopeful meeting of the Diocesan 
Department of Finance in St. Mary's Rectory, 
Kinston. 

On the twenty-fifth I presided at a meeting of 
the Diocesan Executive Council in St. Mary's 
Parish House, Kinston. 

On Sunday, the twenty-eighth at 11:00 A. M. 
I preached and confirmed six persons presented 
by the Rev. George F. Hill, in Christ Church, 
Elizabeth City. 

At 2:30 in the afternoon I made an address at 
the meeting of the Edenton Convocation of the 
Y. P. S. L. in Christ Church Parish House. At 
4:30 I made an address at the State Teachers 
College, Elizabeth City. At six o'clock I preached 
and confirmed one person presented by the Rev. 
S. N. Griffith, in St. Philip's Church, Elizabeth 
City. 

On Wednesday, May the first, at 11:00 A. M., 
I preached the sermon at the Consecration of my 
good friend, the Rev. John L. Jackson, D. D. as 
Bishop of Louisiana in Christ Church Cathedral, 
New Orleans. 

On Sunday, the fifth, at 11:00 A. M. I preached 
the Baccalaureate Sermon in the High School 
Auditorium at Morehead City. 

At six in the afternoon, I confirmed one person 



presented by the Rev. Charles E. Williams in 
Christ Church, New Bern. 

On the evening of the fifth, I preached and 
confirmed eleven persons presented by the Rev. 
Robert I. Johnson in St. Cyprian's Church, New 
Bern. 

On Wednesday, the eighth, I conducted Noon- 
day Prayer and made an address at the District 
Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary in St. John's 
Church, Fayetteville. At 2:00 o'clock in the 
afternoon I confirmed one person, presented by 
the Rev. W. Tate Young. 

On the evening of the eighth I attended the 
Reception, given by the Parish to the Rev. and 
Mrs. Frederick A. Turner in the Parish House of 
the Church of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington. 

This is being written so soon after my letter in 
the April issue of the Mission Herald that I have 
little to report, but I have a very full schedule for 
the rest of the month and shall look forward to 
telling you about it in the June letter. 

I am very happy to report that the Rev. Lewis 
F. Schenck, Rector of All Saints' Church, Tupelo, 
Miss., has accepted a call to Windsor and the 
other churches in Bertie County and will enter 
upon his duties the first Sunday in June. Mr. 
Schenck, who is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Simpson Schenck of St. John's Church, Fayette- 
ville, has accomplished splendid work in Mississ- 
ippi and it is indeed good to know that he is 
coming back to his home Diocese where he will 
receive a loving welcome, not only from the fine 
people of Bertie but from the whole Church 
Family of East Carolina. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 
Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



(Continued from Page 2) 
reading, and suggested some very essential and 
practical things which a clergyman should do to 
keep his mind alert and awake to the living world 
about him. He made a strong plea for reading 
the Church papers ; suggested definite and orga- 
nized study, and insisted that the clergyman 
above all people in these trying times must be 
informed. His talk was practical and suggestive 
and received a splendid response. 

The Fellowship luncheon was had in the Golds- 
boro Hotel and adjournment had at 2 o'clock. 
The next session will be in September in Kinston. 

JACK R. ROUNTREE 



THE MISSION HERALD 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY NEWS 



June Calendar 
St. Barnabas 11 

St. John the Baptist 24 

St. Peter _ _ 29 

From the 1939-1940 Program: "We cannot 
build a Christian world if we fail to make Amer- 
ica a Christian nation. The most important mis- 
sionary field in the world today is Rural America, 
where fifty-six million people live in small towns 
and in the wide open country. Among these 
millions, boys and girls who will be the leaders in 
American life in years to come, are being trained. 
Secular education may educate them to make a 
living, but it requires Christian education to 
teach them how to live. If the Church neglects 
them there is little hope for our own country and 
our country's destiny in the world." 

Our Summer Work will be helping with the 
work along the Inland Waterway, which the Rev. 
A. H. Marshall began several years ago. This 
summer may we double our efforts and interest 
so that the Summer Work will not suffer. 



ST. PAUL'S, GREENVILLE 



From now on outsiders will hear from the 
newly organized Auxiliary, St. Catharine, at St. 
Paul's, Greenville. The president, Mrs. Edd Wil- 
kerson is the one who was chairman of the com- 
mittee that secured thirty-nine new subscriptions 
to the National Church Magazine, Forth, last fall. 
Equally as interested and capable are the vice- 
president, Mrs. F. D. Duncan, and secretary- 
treasurer, Mrs. Lee Folger. The chairmen of the 
other committees will be appointed later. 



ST. PETER'S, WASHINGTON 



On Tuesday morning, April 23 at 10:30 the 
Woman's Auxiliary and the B Branch of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary of St. Peter's Parish, Washing- 
ton held a joint program meeting in the Rena B. 
Harding Memorial Room. 

The subject for study was "Through Tragedy 
to Triumph, a book written by Rev. Basil Mat- 
thews, on some of the things brought to light at 
the World Conference at Madras. 

Mrs. Outland presided, giving the first talk and 
reviewing the first two chapters of the book. 

The entire book was thus reviewed by different 
members of both Auxiliaries. At the conclusion 
of the program the members enjoyed a refreshing 
lunch of sandwiches and hot tea. 



This joint one day session for the study class 
was an innovation and it proved so successful 
that it seems the solution of the problem of pre- 
senting the program meeting when the subject 
embraces a whole book. 

Twenty-nine members were present and all 

seemed to grasp the subject more clearly and 

pleasantly, presented in this manner than when 

it was broken up into several monthly meetings. 

MRS. W. D. GRIMES, Secretary 



HOLY INNOCENTS', SEVEN SPRINGS 



The April meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary 
of Holy Innocents', Seven Springs, met at the 
home of Mrs. Effie Davis. Members and visitors 
present were thirty-three. Our United Thank 
Offering Custodian gave a program on "The Blue 
Box Conversation", followed by a reading taken 
from "Forth — The Spirit of Missions", April 
1940 issue. "Women Look to Great U. T. 0. Ser- 
vice". Presentation takes place in Kansas City, 
October 10th. 

After the program Misses Junie and Hattie 
Lou Whitfield presented the Auxiliary with a 
picture of Mrs. Richard H. Soule, the founder of 
United Thank Offering, from a photograph taken 
recently in her eighty-ninth year. 

The Auxiliary will have Corporate Commun- 
ion and present the United Thank Offering April 
28th. 

At the close of the meeting a social hour was 
enjoyed. 

MRS. KLEBER CROOM. 



CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN 



Members of Christ Church feel that they have 
been blessed in so many ways this year. In 
March we were very fortunate in having with us 
at our general meeting, two women who always 
bring to us such joy. Mrs. Fred Outland gave us 
a most inspiring talk leaving us with the desire 
to go forward, to accept greater undertakings, 
which will lift our spiritual lives to higher levels ; 
and Mrs. Victor Shelburne, who described to us 
the lovely "Book of Memory" which has been 
completed. 

Under the splendid leadership of Mrs. John A. 
Guion, our Auxiliary president, the seven chap- 
ters are doing excellent work. Each Monday is 
set aside for chapter meetings, and we let no 
social function or secular interests interfere with 
our attendance. At this time we read articles 
from many Church periodicals, thus keeping 
ourselves well informed of the wonderful work 



MAY, 1940 



of the clergy, missionaries, and laity of our 
Church all over the world. 

The chapters recently filled a box of bed linens 
and hospital garments for Good Shepherd Hos- 
pital, this being the Spring work of the Supply 
Department of the Woman's Auxiliary. 

"China Day" was observed, each chapter con- 
tributing toward the purchase of a refrigerator 
for our Diocesan missionary, Dr. Lula Disosway, 
of St. Eizabeth's Hospital, Shanghai. The dif- 
ferent parishes in the Diocese are making this 
project possible, as Dr. Disosway needs this ice 
box for her serums, etc. 

Interesting articles pertaining to China and the 
work of the Church missionaries were read and 
discussed. 

Under the direction of our parish Christian 
Educational Chairman, Mrs. Romulus Nunn, an 
interesting scrapbook has been compiled, each 
chapter choosing a different country in which 
our Church is at work, and describing, by en- 
lightening articles and pictures the conditions 
and problems, the activities and accomplishments 
of those whom we have sent "into the by-ways 
and hedges, to make Him known to all nations 
as their Saviour and King." 

Mrs. George Roberts, parish U. T. 0. Custodian, 
has also compiled an instructive scrapbook con- 
taining much that is interesting of the work 
being done all over the world by our Church. 

On Sunday, April 28th, a U. T. 0. service was 
held with Corporate Communion. At this time 
our Diocesan U. T. 0. Custodian, Mrs. Frank 
Fagan, made a most inspiring talk, which took 
the place of the sermon. 

As a result of the U. T. 0. that morning, it was 
found that the number of women using the little 
Blue Box has increased considerably, nearly a 
hundred women giving, in gratitude for the many 
blessings bestowed upon them throughout the 
year. 

We have just had the blessed privilege of 
having with us our beloved Bishop Darst, who, on 
Saturday evening, April 20th, with the Rev. C. E. 
Williams, rector, officiated at the marriage of 
Elizabeth Ammons, formerly a member of Christ 
Church, New Bern, now of Washington, D. C. 

On Sunday, April 21st, the Bishop confirmed a 
class of fifteen girls and boys, and after the 
morning service, baptized an infant. 

Members of St. Agnes Chapter, through love 
and the realization of the great need and con- 
venience, has had built a lovely and complete 
Sacristy, for the use of the Altar Guild, who so 
faithfully serve. It has been given in loving 
memory of a former rector, Rev. Ilbert deL. Bray- 



shaw. Its six small Gothic windows were placed 
in memory of the following faithful members of 
Christ Church who have gone to their reward. 

Margaret Capehart Pearsall 

Mollie Hall Heath 

Laura Bryan Hughes 

R. Justice Disosway 

Julia Gatlin Bynum 

Mark DeWolff Stevenson 

These names are inscribed on a lovely bronze 
tablet which was given in memory of Robert 
Taggert Kafer. 

Among the other memorials contained in the 
Sacristy are the following: 

A large mahogany table in memory of Georgia 
Oxley, 1877-1938, given by her sister, Minnie 
Oxley. 

A mahogany chest of drawers in memory of 
Mrs. Mary K. Nash. 

A small walnut table in memory of Henry 
Ravenscroft Bryan, Jr., given by his sister, 
Margaret Shepard Bryan. 

A cabinet across the north end of the Sacristy, 
especially built by Mitchell Rountree of New Bern, 
with a built-in sink, with cover, given by Mrs. 
O. A. Kafer, in memory of her father, Henry A. 
Gibbs. 

A chair in memory of Minnie Bryan London, 
given by her sister, Isobel B. Jordon. 

A chair in memory of Jacob Gooding, Sr., given 
by his grand-daughter, Maria Gooding White- 
hurst. 

A complete set of Altar linens, given by Mrs. 
Leo. H. Harvey, in memory of Miss Mollie Heath. 

An electric tea-kettle given by Mrs. Carl Dan- 
iels in memory of her husband. 

Many more have been added very recently. 

The completion of the Sacristy brings to ful- 
fillment the dream of many years. It has taken 
much thought, sacrifice and work, but it has been 
a labor of love. 

MARY R. DUNN, 

Parish Publicity Chairman 



IN REMEMBRANCE 



In loving remembrance of our Daughter and 
Sister, Eleanor Cleo Wilson who departed this 
life five years ago May 1st, 1935. 

"If ever love existed, 

If ever a sweet flower grew; 
If ever a soul fulfilled its mission on earth, 

Dear Daughter it certainly was you. 

Mother, Daddy, Sister and Brothers 



CAMP LEACH 



SEASON OF 1940 
FOR TRAINING LEADERS UNDER WHOLESOME ENVIRONMENT 
ATTRACTIVE COURSES TAUGHT BY ABLE AND TRUSTED LEADERS 
RELIGIOUS — RECREATIONAL — SOCIAL 



Y. P. S. L. DIOCESAN CONVENTION 
June 14th to 16th 

HAMPTON NOE, President 

Wilmington, N. C. 

HOST LEAGUE— ST. JOHN'S 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Cost of Convention— $2.00 

SENIOR CAMP —BOYS AND GIRLS 
June 17ih to 30th 

REV. MORTIMER GLOVER, Director 

Wilmington, N. C. 

REV. JOHN GRAINGER, Assistant Director 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

Ages of Campers— 15 fc> 24 years 

Cost of Camp— $16.00, including $1.00 registration 

Theme of Camp: "Let's Know Our Church 

COURSES — TEACHERS 

"My Church and I" Rev. John Grainger 

"The Church's Symbols" Rev. John Armfield 

"Our Church's Program" Rev. W. R. Noe 

"Songs of the Faith" Mr. Ralph Percival 

"We Teach Religion" Miss Margaret Brett 

"Young People at Work" Miss Anna L. Robertson 

JUNIOR CAMP — BOYS AND GIRLS 

July 1st to 14th 

REV. AND MRS. E. F. MOSELEY, Directors 

Kinston, N. C. 

REV. HARRY JACKSON, Assistant Director 

Ayden, N. C. 

Ages of Campers 12 to 14 years 

Cost of Camp— $16.00, including $1.00 registration 

COURSES 

HEROES OF THE FAITH 

THE WAY OF CHRIST 

APPRECIATION OF WORSHIP 

MIDGET CAMPS — BOYS AND GIRLS 
First: July 15th to 21st — Second: July 22nd to 28th 

REV. AND MRS. JOHN HARDY, Directors 
Williamston, N. C. 

Simple Courses taught. Much time given to music, 
dramatics and directed play. 

Two Midget Camps this year. If there are accomo- 
dations those at first camp may remain for the second. 



State on application if camper wishes to stay for 
two weeks. 

Ages of Campers — 9 to 12 years 
Cost for one week $8.00, including $1.00 registration 
Cost for two weeks — $16.00, including $1.00 registration 

ADULT CONFERENCE 

July 29th to August 3rd 

For Woman's Auxiliary and Church School Teachers 

and Workers 

MRS. JOHN HARDY 

Director for Woman's Auxiliary 

REV. MORTIMER GLOVER 

Director for Department of Religious Education 

REV. E. F. MOSELEY 

Manager for this Camp 

Cost for Conference — $6.00, including $1.00 registration 

N. A. L. A. Credits for the Senior Camp and Adult 

Conference 

RECREATIONS 

Baseball, Basketball, Volleyball, Swimming, 

Horseshoes, Hiking 

Evening programs of stunts and plays, Victrola, Radio 

Camp Fire every night 

Life-guard on duty when campers go swimming 

Registered nurse on duty at all times. 

Doctor within call. 

THINGS TO BRING 

Sheets, Blankets (2), Sweaters, Raincoats, Towels, 

Toilet Articles, Notebooks, Bible, Prayer Book 

Also costumes for pageants and plays. 

RULES 

1. Campers are not allowed to leave camp or go in 
swimming without permission. 

2. Every camper must bring medical certificate. 
(Examination within ten days of camp.) 

3. No boxes of food to be sent to campers. 

4. Long distance calls discouraged. (Mail may be 
sent to Camp Leach, Washington, N. C.) 

Campers are urged not to arrive at camp until after- 
noon of date of their particular camp. 

APPLICATION 

Send application with $1.00 registration fee, as soon 
as convenient, to Rev. Stephen Gardner, Business 
Manager, Washington, N. C. 

For further information write the director of the Camp 
you are interested in 



MAY, 1940 



EVANGELISM FIRST — WHY? 



By Mrs. Linwood D. Latta, of St. Paul's, 
Wilmington 



Editor's Note: This paper was given second 
place in the contest sponsored by the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Diocese. 

What Is Evangelism? 

The dictionary gives us this definition of Evan- 
gelism: "Zeal in spreading the Gospel". "Zeal" 
we know means "ardour", "fervor", "enthusi- 
asm". To simplify this we might say that 
Evangelism is telling the good news about Jesus 
Christ with love and fervor. A theologian has 
said that it is the presentation of the love of God 
as revealed in Jesus Christ. 

The "Good News" 

God created man in His own image, giving him 
the power to choose between good and evil. 
Through Adam all men sinned and fell far short 
of the Glory of God. But God, in His infinite 
Wisdom, Justice, Mercy and Love, sent His only 
begotten son, Jesus Christ, into the world. He 
became a man, "took upon himself the form of 
a servant", "gave his life a ransom for many", 
and by his death on the Cross "took away the 
sins of the world". Thus by our faith and belief 
in Him we are restored to Divine favor. 

But that is not all ! Christ arose from the dead, 
was seen of Mary, Peter and the other Apostles, 
and at His ascension gave His Divine Commis- 
sion — "Go ye therefore and teach all nations, bap- 
tizing them in the name of the Father, and of the 
Son, and of the Holy Ghost ; teaching them to ob- 
serve all things whatsoever I have commanded 
you ; and lo, I am with you always, even unto the 
end of the world." (St. Matt. 28:19-20.) St. Mark 
adds to this account — "They went forth and 
preached everywhere, the Lord working with them 
confirming the word." St. Luke adds a more 
graphic description of the resurrected Christ ap- 
pearing to the eleven in Jerusalem. He ate be- 
fore them, and "opened" their understanding of 
the Scriptures concerning Christ's suffering and 
resurrection, "That repentance and remission of 
sins" should be preached in His name among all 
nations, beginning at Jerusalem, "and ye are my 
witnesses of these things. And behold! I send 
the promise of my Father upon you, but tarry ye 
in Jerusalem until ye be endued with power from 
on high." (St. Luke 24:46-49.) See also Acts 
1:1-8. 



The Church's Charter 

The Church began with the descent of the 
Holy Spirit on the Day of Pentecost, uniting the 
company of Apostles and Disciples, some of whom 
were women, into a Divine and human fellowship. 
The Church was formed to be the body of Christ, 
through which he would energize the faithful to 
carry on those things which He began "both to do 
and to teach" in His life on earth. Three thou- 
sand were added that day. The "witnesses" con- 
tinued in prayer, and the "Lord added daily" to 
that number. 

The Church is charged with the task of redeem- 
ing the world order by working within and upon 
it. It does not exist for its own sake, but is a 
tool with which God seeks to redeem His Crea- 
tion, and it must be extended and the bounds 
pushed until it includes all nations. 

Witnesses 

In the first chapter of St. John's gospel we read 
that John, the forerunner, "looking upon Jesus" 
as he walked, said to the discple, Andrew, who 
with another disciple stood beside John, "Behold 
the Lamb of God!" Jesus turned and saw them 
following, and asked what they sought. "Master, 
where dwellest thou?" "Come and see" said Je- 
sus. "And they abode with him that day." But 
before Andrew accepted the invitation, he "first 
findeth Peter, his own brother, and brought him 
to Jesus". "And Philip findeth Nathaniel". A 
finer example of personal work cannot be found. 
John's acceptance of his task of proclaiming 
Christ's advent, his unusual preparation by fast- 
ing and separation, his instant recognition of 
the "Lamb of God", pointing Him out to others 
and saying, "I bear record that this is the Lamb 
of God that taketh away the sins of the world." 

Here is an example for mothers. Elizabeth 
knew her child, John, was sent by God, and reared 
him for His service. Andrew, before he went 
further than express a desire to know Jesus or 
enter His abode, went after his brother, Peter, 
and brought him into the Divine presence. And 
Philip found Nathaniel, his friend. 

Every follower of Christ may have a point of 
contact with some person who is unsaved that 
no one else may have. A professor of Bible his- 
tory in one of our large Southern Seminaries tells 
this story: 

"I have a friend that for over twenty years 
I have loved like a brother. We played golf, 
hunted and fished together. I knew him to be a 
man of high ethics, but unchurched. I had often 
asked him to go to church with me, and he fre- 



8 



THE MISSION HERALD 



quently went, but I had never gone further than 
that. One night riding home from our fishing 
camp, there fell a silence between us. I sensed 
that he was deep in thought over some problem. 
Suddenly by some unexplainable urge, I surprised 
both myself and him by saying, "Tom, did you 
ever consider giving yourself to God?" Imme- 
diately he pulled to one side of the road and stop- 
ping the car, said "0, Mac, I've waited twenty 
years for you to ask me that. Tell me how." 

Many of us need to be shocked out of our com- 
placency in conforming to a convention, and begin 
witnessing, telling the good news. 

Some one has said that the unused ability of 
the Church is the exultation of hell, the surprise 
of Heaven, the loss of man and the grief of God. 
Conservation of energy is one of the greatest 
problems in mechanics. We should apply the 
same principle to our Church. God's power is 
available with all its "ancient touch", the Church 
has great reservoirs of energy that probably are 
being frittered away on meaningless things that 
contribute nothing to the advancement of God's 
work. 

It cannot be that we do not feel a great thank- 
fulness that Christ is our Lord and Master. We 
surely love Him with ardor and devotion. We do 
pray that His kingdom may come on earth. We 
ask Him daily, yes, hourly, that peace may come 
to abide in the hearts of men and nations. And 
yet there is inherent in us a quality that prevents 
us from speaking to another about things of the 
Spirit. We have grown indifferent of our obliga- 
tion and privilege as disciples, to speak to others 
about Christ. We have been conformers to a con- 
vention, but have not been guided through the 
first steps into the joy of soul-winning. By a new 
consecration, prayer, and study, we will overcome 
these scruples, 

"Lord, speak to me, that I may speak 

In living echoes of thy tone ; 
As thou hast sought, so let me seek 

Thy erring children lost and lone." 

The World's Need 

The paramount need of the world today, both 
statesmen and business leaders declare, is for a 
finer code of ethics and cleaner living. They call 
on the Church to lead the way, and church leaders 
agree that the paramount need of the world is for 
a praying, soul-winning Church. The Forward 
Movement Commission has offered many perti- 
nent suggestions in their "Half Hour" papers for 
parish programs on Evangelism. 

If the Church is to grow beyond adding its 



youthful baptized members, effort must be made 
to educate and train classes in personal evangel- 
ism, who can seek out the unchurched, put them 
in touch with the parish Rector, welcome them 
into the Church membership and provide some 
work for them to do in the Parish. Such a pro- 
gram is threefold: It develops the laity, it seeks 
the lost, and should be a benefit to priest and 
parish. 

The Commission on Evangelism in East Caro- 
lina Diocese has a very definite program. Among 
its suggestions made nearly two years ago at a 
Clergy Conference and adopted, was the follow- 
ing: "Stress responsibility for all Christians to 
engage in personal evangelism, and urge consid- 
eration of the privilege and responsibility for each 
to win some soul for Christ." (Mission Herald, 
Nov. '38.) What have we done with this? How 
many of the two thousand confirmed persons 
unaccounted for in this Diocese have we reached ? 

In the Revelation of St. John the Divine to the 
Seven Churches in Asia he lists their character- 
istics. One was neither hot nor cold, one had lost 
its first love, and to another he said : "I know thy 
works, that thou hast a name that thou lovest, 
but art dead. Be watchful and strengthen the 
things that remain ... I have not found thy work 
perfect before God." (Rev. 3:1-2). 



ORDINATION OF CHARLES M. JOHNSON 
AND VERNON EARL ARTIS 



Charles Merchant Johnson and Vernon Earl 
Artis were Ordained to the Diaconate in St. 
Cyprian's Church, New Bern, N. C. by the Rt. 
Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Bishop of the 
Diocese of East Carolina, on Tuesday, May 21st 
at 10:30 A. M. The Ordination Sermon was 
preached by the Rev. Worth Wicker, Rector of 
St. Paul's Church, Greenville, and the candidates 
were presented by the Rev. Robert I. Johnson, 
Rector of St. Cyprian's Church, New Bern, father 
of Charles M. Johnson. 

Other clergy present and taking part in the 
services were: Rev. Mortimer Glover, Rev. Ed- 
mund F. Moseley. Rev. Stephen Gardner, Rev. 
Sidney E. Matthews, Rev. S. N. Griffith, Rev. 
John B. Brown and Rev. Oscar E. Holder. 

The Rev. Mr. Johnson will be placed in charge 
of the mission churches of Washington, Belhaven, 
Aurora and Sladesville and the Rev. Mr. Artis 
will be in charge of St. Timothy's, Farmville and 
St. Andrew's, Greenville, during the summer 
months. 



MAY, 1940 




Men's Bible Class of St. Paul's Church, Beaufort, 






BIBLE CLASS OF ST. PAUL'S, BEAUFORT 



This class has an enrollment of 68 men and it 
is hoped to increase the class to 100 by January 
1941. 

The class has an open Forum of about fifteen 
minutes after the lesson and any subject the men 
are interested in is taken up. 

The class is made up of men from the various 
walks of life. Scientists, Engineers, Real Estate 
and Insurance men; Carpenters, Fishermen, 
Laborers, Coast Guard Men. In fact it is a cross 
section of life. 

John C. Rice is President, and W. F. Adair is 
Secretary of the organization. 

We now have a plan to have joint meetings 
with the Men's Classes of the Methodist and 
Baptist Sunday Schools about every month or 
two. Thus far no plan has been worked out on 
this. 

C. R. Wheatly, who is a member of the Execu- 
tive Council of the Diocese is teacher of the Class. 
The Rev. E. C. McConnell is rector of St. Paul's 
Parish. 



THE MEN'S CLUB OF ST. JOHN'S PARISH, 
WILMINGTON 



At the 16th meeting of the Men's Club of St. 
John's Parish, Mrs. W. 0. S. Sutherland was 
guest speaker and gave a very interesting and 
highly informative talk on the Madras Confer- 
ence held in India in 1938. This was an inter- 
national meeting of Churches of all denomina- 
tions and from all parts of the world, comprising 
170 different languages from 70 countries, all 
meeting to gain and exchange ideas on one 



subject: worldwide Christian Unity. As an ex- 
ample of the fine spirit of cooperation displayed 
by participants, one representative spent eigh- 
teen months learning the English language, Mrs. 
Sutherland said. One of the plans adopted by 
the Conference calls for a study course each year. 
This year the subject will be "The World Mission 
of the Church." Mrs. Sutherland concluded her 
address by reminding us that the Madras Con- 
ference is only an instrument depending on the 
wholehearted support of people throughout the 
world for its correct application and results ob- 
tained. 

The entertainment portion of the program was 
under the supervision of St. Hilda's Auxiliary, 
who presented a highly amusing program re- 
quiring monologues and imitations by the un- 
fortunates who had been so unlucky as to draw 
a slip directing them to go into their dance, etc., 
much to the embarrassment of the performers, 
and the amusement of fellow members and their 
guests. 



MISSION OF ST. JOHN'S, WILMINGTON 



St. John's Mission has been having a fine at- 
tendance at the Church School and the Lula Cox 
Auxiliary. 

On a recent evening the people of the Mission 
gave a lovely surprise Birthday Banquet to the 
Rector. A trio from the Church of the Covenant 
sang some beautiful classical selections and a 
Hill Billy Band played and sang most enter- 
tainingly. The Rev. W. R. Noe was guest speaker 
and many of the members of the Mission spoke 
words of appreciation. There were 66 in attend- 
ance and the evening was enjoyed by all. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



KANUGA CONFERENCES AND CAMPS 



The new folders for Kanuga Conferences an- 
nouncing the program for the thirteenth season 
are full of interesting details. The directors of the 
various Conferences urge that registrations 
should be sent in as soon as possible as a num- 
ber have already been received. 

The 1940 schedule opens with the Retreat for 
Women, which begins on the evening of June 10th 
and continues through breakfast on June 13th, 
with the Rev. A. Rufus Morgan as conductor. 
Those women who in the past have availed them- 
selves of this opportunity have found the time 
of quiet and spiritual refreshment of lasting 
value. 

The Woman's Auxiliary Convention of the Dio- 
cese of Western North Carolina will begin with 
the afternoon session on June 13th and continue 
through lunch on the 14th. 

A change in the usual order puts the Junior 
Conference for boys and girls, twelve, thirteen 
and fourteen, first of the Conferences, June 15th 
to 28th. The Rev. A. Rufus Morgan, director, has 
chosen for the theme of the Conferences, "Torch- 
bearers for Christ". Newcomers to the faculty 
include the Rev. Charles S. Seymour, the Rev. 
William S. Lea, the Rev. Allen Clarkson; and in 
Handicraft, Misses Anne Sterne and Mozelle 
Skinner and Mr. Glenn Deason. Miss Effie Wool- 
sey will teach dancing. 

A splendid program has been prepared for the 
Young People's Conference, June 29th to July 
12th, by the Rev. John A. Pinckney, director. 
The Rev. Porter Ball and the Rev. W. S. Turner, 
who for a number of years were among the list of 
campers, are welcome members to the faculty 
this year. Other new faculty include the Rev. 
Wood B. Carper, and the Rev. W. W. Lumpkin. 

The Rt. Rev. John Long Jackson, Bishop of 
Louisiana, will again direct the Adult Conference, 
July 13th to 27th, which includes the Clergy 
School and the Conference for College Students. 
Listed on the faculty are the names of many old 
friends who have been an inspiration and help 
throughout other Conferences. Among new mem- 
bers on the faculty are the Rev. Louis C. Melcher, 
the Rt. Rev. John J. Gravatt, D. D., and the Rev. 
Frank E. Walters. Mrs. James R. Cain will teach 
a short course, July 15th to 19th, in preparation 
for the Woman's Auxiliary Triennial Meeting, 
open only to delegates and alternates to the 
Triennial. 

The Clergy School, open to both clergy and 
laymen, will have for its director the Rt. Rev. 
Albert Thomas, D. D. 

The Conference for College Students will have 



for its director the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, 
D. D. The courses will be open to college stu- 
dents and those entering college next fall. 

The Midget Camp for girls ten and eleven years 
old, July 13th to 27th, will have for its_ director 
Mrs. M. D. Whisnant. Miss Margaret Marshall 
will have charge of the courses. 

The entire property will be operated from July 
27th to September 3rd on the guest basis. 

The Kanuga Camp for boys, nine to fourteen 
years, will be open August 3rd to 31st. 



M. D. WHISNANT BECOMES SUPERINTEN- 
DENT OF THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 



Mrs. Whisnant Will Be Supervising Matron 



Will Take Charge June First 

Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Whisnant, of Belhaven, 
have accepted the positions of superintendent 
and supervising matron, respectively, of the 
Thompson Orphanage to succeed the Rev. W. H. 
Wheeler and Mrs. Wheeler, it was announced by 
Hamilton C. Jones, Chairman of the Executive 
Committee of the institution. 

Mr. Whisnant is at present principal of the 
Belhaven public schools, and Mrs. Whisnant is 
teaching in the schools. Mr. Jones said that 
both have a background of experience which 
should enable them to accomplish much in their 
work with the children of the Orphanage, which 
is operated by the Episcopal Church. They will 
take up their work on June 1st. 

The new superintendent was graduated from 
the University of North Carolina in 1927. He was 
a member of the Golden Fleece, honorary organi- 
zation, and was captain of the football team. 
Since that time, he has taught physical educa- 
tion in the Gastonia public schools, has served as 
director of athletics for the Hoosac School for 
Boys at Hoosac, N. Y., and has taught in the 
Mount Olive schools. He is a native of Mor- 
ganton. 

Mrs. Whisnant is a graduate of Brenau College 
and has taught in the Gary, Mount Olive, Gas- 
tonia, and Belhaven schools. Both are members 
of the Episcopal Church and have for the last 
ten years been in charge of water sports and 
other young people's programs at the conference 
conducted at Kanuga Lake each year by the 
Episcopal Church. She is a native of Belhaven. 

Rev. Mr. Wheeler, who resigned recently from 
his position as superintendent, will continue to 
be connected with the institution. He will serve 
as chaplain and will assist in promoting the in- 
terests of the Orphanage over the state, Mr. 
Jones said. — Charlotte Observer. 



IJoung People's Service Leaque 



By Mary D. Home, Publicity Chairman 



A LETTER FOR YA' 



Saturday, June 15th 






Dear Leaguers: 

Well here we are at the beginning of the end 
of another year of League work, and we hope it. 
was a successful year, but only time will tell — the 
time being June 16 at approxmately 11:45 A. M. 
when the Bishop awards his shield and the pen- 
nants to those hard working children of his. And 
this brings us to what we've been dreaming about 
all year — Camp Leach and Convention time. 

The Convention starts Friday night, June 14th, 
with a banquet at which the Rev. John A. Wright, 
Rector of Christ Church, Raleigh, will be guest 
speaker. His topic will be "The Ideal of Service 
— to give definitely of self and substance." 
To those of you who don't know Mr. Wright you 
don't know what a grand treat you've got in store 
for you, and to those of you who do — well I just 
bet everyone of you will be right there to hear 
him talk. I always attend Christ Church when I 
am in Raleigh and take my word for it you'll like 
Mr. Wright. 

And then after Convention, there's Camp. 
They're changing the camps around a bit this 
year and we hope it will work out beautifully. 

Well I guess there's nothing else except — 
thanks for being so wonderful about helping 
with the Searchlight. We couldn't have gotten 
along without your help and we want you to 
know we appreciate it. 

So till we see you at the Convention — and every 
body please be there — be good to yourself, and — 
well just be good. 

MARY 



CONVENTION PROGRAM 






The following program has been submitted for 
the 17th Annual Convention of the Young People's 
Service League of the Diocese of East Carolina, 
to be held at Camp Leach, June 14, 15, 16. St. 
John's, Wilmington, will be host for the 1940 
Convention. 

Friday, June 14th 

4:00-6:30 P. M. Registration. 

7:30 Banquet. 

8:30 Program and Games. 

10:30 Camp Fire. 

11:15 Taps. 



7:00 A. M. 


Reveille. 


7:05 


Setting-up Exercises. 


7:10-7:20 


Morning Dip. 


7:45 


Morning Watch. 


8:15 


Breakfast. 


9:15 


Business Session. 




Call to Order. 




Worship Service. 




Roll Call by Parishes. 


■ 


Minutes of last Convention. 


! 


Appointment of Committees. 




Report of Committee on Dis- 




patch of Business. 




Report of Credentials Com- 




mittee. 




Report of Executive Com- 




mittee. 




Report of Resolutions Com- 




mittee. 




Report of Objectives Com- 




mittee. 




League Reports. 


1:00 P. M. 


Lunch. 


2:00 


Business Session. 




Unfinished Business. 




Report of Courtesy Com- 




mittee. 




Report of the Finance Com- 




mittee. 




Report of Nominating Com- 




mittee. 




Election of Officers. 




Adjournment. 


3:00 


Executive Committee Con- 




ference. 


4:00-5:00 


Swimming. 


6:15 


Supper. 


7:00 


Vespers. 


7:15 


Night Program. 


10:30 


Preparation Service at Camp- 




fire. 


11:15 


Taps. 




Sunday, June 16th 


7:30 A. M. 


Reveille. 


8:00 


Celebration of Holy Com- 




munion. 




Presentation of Y. P. Thank 




Offering. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



8:45 


Breakfast. 


9:45 


Discussion Groups. 


11:00 


Morning Prayer and Sermon. 




Awarding of Pennants and 




Shield. 


1:00 P. M. 


Lunch. 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



Hampton Noe has asked that the following list 
of Committee Chairmen appointments be pub- 
lished in the Searchlight so that the Chairmen 
may have a little more time in working out their 
reports. 

They are : 

Dispatch of Business — Robert Russ, chairman ; 
Franklin Kizer, advisor. 

Resolutions — Hallie Townes, chairman; Rev. 
Mortimer Glover, advisor. 

Finance — Louise Elam, chairman; Rev. W. R. 
Noe, advisor. 

Objectives — George Stenhouse, chairman; Rev. 
John Grainger, advisor. 

Courtesy — Grace Sloan, chairman; Rev. Alex- 
ander Miller, advisor. 

Nominating — Bessie Fay Hunt, chairman; Mr. 
E. O. Rehm, advisor. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, TOLAR-HART, 
FAYETTEVILLE 



Our Lenten Study Course, "An Outline of the 
Christian Sacraments", proved to be very helpful, 
and we plan to have review programs on the 
Sacraments twice a year. 

Our Junior League, with Estelle Grady as coun- 
sellor, also took up the study of the Sacraments 
during Lent. 

Ten members of our League attended the Ser- 
vice at St. Paul's, Wilmington, on Sunday, March 
31st, and heard Bishop Darst preach, before go- 
ing to St. James Parish House for lunch and the 
Convocational meeting in the afternoon. We ar- 
rived home in time for League and everybody 
reported a very worthwhile meeting, and the 
determination to make our League a better one. 
HELEN BARRETT, Diocesan Secretary 



ST. JAMES', WILMINGTON 



For our Lenten Study Course this spring we 
had a discussion of the Sacraments. During this 
discussion we had many very excellent speakers, 
and I think the members of the League got a 
great deal out of these discussions. 

The regular Young People's Convocation was 



held on March 31, at St. James', Wilmington. 
Before the luncheon as many as possible attended 
a service at St. Paul's Church where Bishop Darst 
preached an excellent sermon, especially to the 
young people. The luncheon was served around 
one o'clock; then there was a business meeting. 
After this meeting everyone enjoyed talking to 
their friends. 

On April 20, the members of St. James' League 
enjoyed a delightful weiner roast at Wrightsville 
Beach. Everyone had a wonderful time. 

LULA PULLIAM, Publicity Chairman 



GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMINGTON 



The Senior League of Good Shepherd Church 
has just finished a study of the Church, and it 
was very interesting. We had an I. Q. program 
one league night and our rector, Mr. Turner, acted 
as Dr. I. Q. The program consisted of questions 
on the Church and Bible, and the prizes were 
silver bells. Everyone enjoyed it very much. 
We are now planning a party to raise some money. 

THELMA MINTZ 



ST. JOHN'S, FAYETTEVILLE 



We feel badly that a contribution was not sent 
from our League for the April issue of the Mis- 
sion Herald, but due to election of new officers 
just about that time, the new Diocesan Repre- 
sentative, yours truly, neglected to send it in. We 
were so glad to read that the other Leagues in the 
Diocese have been accomplishing so much. 

Our League has been having its regular meet- 
ings every Sunday night with very good attend- 
ance and much enthusiasm for carrying out the 
meaning of the word SERVICE in our League. 
We have adopted a poverty stricken family to 
whom we take clothes, furniture and food as 
often as we possibly can. We not only find that 
we are helping this family very much with our 
gifts, but we also find ourselves being helped by 
the spirit of giving. 

On behalf of our League, I would like to say 
that we all thought the Convocation meeting in 
Wilmington was one of the best we have ever 
attended. 

All our programs of late have been most inter- 
esting. During Lent, of course, we discussed 
Bishop Wilson's "An Outline of the Christian 
Sacraments", and found it to be not only most 
interesting, but enlightening as well. At our last 
Fellowship supper (our four counsellors give us 
a supper whenever our four groups rotate) we 
had a regular Camp sing. We got out our League 



MAY, 1940 



13 



Handbooks (made by one of our members) and 
sang all the good old Camp Leach songs. It 
made us think more than ever of Camp Leach 
and how we are looking forward to being there 
this summer. 

In our new League Handbook, we have com- 
piled all the information necessary to carry on 
the work of the Y. P. S. L. according to the Four 
Ideals. Along with the motto, aim, purpose, 
watchword, slogan, Four Ideals, and all the other 
information which every Leaguer should know, 
we have the Constitution, Installation and Admis- 
sion services, Prayers, Hymns, and Camp songs. 

At present we are planning many interesting 
programs and services which we are hoping will 
help stimulate the young people of today to go 
forward with the work of the Church. 



HOLY INNOCENTS', SEVEN SPRINGS 



.(Note: The first report came too late for the 
April issue, so we are printing it now. The second 
is the regular May report.) 

The Young People's Service League of Holy 
Innocents', Seven Springs held its regular Execu- 
tive meeting, Sunday night, March 24, with Mar- 
garet Williams. 

Five members of our League attended the 
meeting of the Convocation of Wilmington. 

We studied the prescribed Lenten Study Course 
and found it very interesting. 

The Young People's Service League of Holy 
Innocents', Seven Springs, held an Executive 
meeting on Sunday April 28, and made plans for 
a Mother's Day program to be held Sunday morn- 
ing, May 12, after Sunday School. We also dis- 
cussed remodeling the "Out-door Chapel" for 
summer meetings, and trying to create more 
interest in our programs. 

MARTHA RAYE BARWICK 



ST. JOHN'S, WILMINGTON 



St. John's League has been extremely busy 
since we last wrote you, and we'd like to tell you 
just what we have been doing. 

Sunday, April 14th, we gave a Hymnology pro- 
gram at the Catherine Kennedy Home. This is a 
home for elderly ladies who have no homes and 
no one to look after them. Six of the great 
hymns of the Church were sung by the League, 
and the story of each hymn, the author, how it 
came to be written, and the composer was given 
by different Leaguers. In addition, we had a 
prayer service. 



The next Sunday night, we had a Bible Quiz. 
The Leaguers were lined up on either side of the 
room and Bible questions were asked, just like an 
old fashioned spelling bee. An instructive and 
amusing time was had by all. 

On the first Sunday in May, the League held 
regular Evening Prayer at the Red Cross Sani- 
tarium. The League had complete charge of the 
service and also acted as the Choir. Mr. Walter 
Noe, one of our Counsellors, made the talk. They 
all seemed glad indeed to have us with them, and 
it was a pleasure for us to be able to do something 
for these shut-in people. 

A Mother's Day Banquet for all members and 
their mothers was given on the evening of Whit- 
sunday. Each mother was presented with a cor- 
sage of beautiful flowers and a delicious dinner 
was prepared and served by our members. After 
the dinner, an impressive ceremony was held in 
which our Thank Offering was received. We 
were very prominent at the Church services on 
this day, as we had a full Corporate Communion 
in the morning, and a special Mother's Day Ser- 
vice at night, at which time the League acted 
as the Choir. 

Our League is really accomplishing something 
this year, and we will continue our endeavors to 
make St. John's League worthy of being an 
important part of our Parish life. 

GLADYS BOYD, Secretary 



ST. PAUL'S, WILMINGTON 



Since no one else has offered to do it for us, 
we, the Y. P. S. L. of St. Paul's Church, wish to 

put in a word of praise for ourselves. Believe 

it or not, we DO have our serious moments, and 
in our estimation, we think we have a wonderful 
League. We divided the League into four groups, 
A, B, C, and D, each group having a counsellor. 
Since there are usually four Sundays in each 
month, A takes the program the first Sunday, B 
the next, and so on. If there should happen to be 
five Sundays, then the counsellors take charge 
and we are always sure of a fine program then. 

We have found that by using this method, 
everyone has a chance to show what he can do 
and yet no one person is overworked. Then too, 
the spirit of competition which stimulates inter- 
est is brought in and helps us hold our standard 
high and every effort is made to present a pro- 
gram just a little better than the last one. 

This is the first year we have tried this method 
and it has worked out so well that we can't re- 
sist taking a little pat on the back. And if you 
don't think we're good just ask us. 

F. D. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MISS MACMURRAY GUEST OF WOMAN'S 

AUXILIARY, CHRIST CHURCH, 

NEW BERN 



One of the most inspiring meetings ever held 
by Christ Church Woman's Auxiliary was that 
of May 6th, at which time Miss Elizabeth Mac- 
Murray of the Inland Waterway Missions came 
to us with a wonderful revelation of her interest- 
ing work at Calabash. She is carrying on the 
splendid work started by Rev. and Mrs. Arthur 
Marshall. 

Miss MacMurray is a graduate of Columbia 
Bible College, and upon completion of her course 
was called by Bishop Darst to assist Rev. Arthur 
Marshall in this mission. She has been there 
since September, 1939. 

In her talk, Miss MacMurray spoke of the many 
handicaps under which her work has been carried 
on, but these obstacles, she said are being steadily 
overcome through the interest and cooperation 
of members of the community. 

Services are held regularly on Wednesdays and 
Sundays, and on alternate Wednesday nights, the 
Rev. J. Leon Malone of Wrightsville Sound, comes 
over to hold the service. 

A parish house is being built, a donation of 
$250.00 having been given, and the labor is being 
done by interested members of the community. 

The revelation of what Christ in their lives can 
mean, has been wonderful. Miss MacMurray 
made an earnest plea for the prayers of our 
people, that the work so splendidly progressing 
may continue. 

At the completion of her talk, Mrs. John Guion, 
Auxiliary president, asked that we follow our 
rector, Rev. C. E. Williams, single file, into the 
Parish House. 

As Mr. Williams entered the room he was given 
one end of a paper chain, and this he carried on, 
each member coming in grasping a part of the 
chain, and moving on, until finally the chain 
reached competely around the room. 

Mrs. Ernest Bender, Fellowship Chairman, then 
introduced her young friends, Harry and Louis 
Cramer, twin sons of Mrs. Jacob Cramer who 
played the piano for them while one played the 
violin accompaniment for his brother to sing the 
Prayer Hymn "Others". During the singing of 
this most impressive hymn Auxiliary members 
bowed their heads in meditation. 

"Lord, help me live from day to day 
In such a self forgetful way 
That even when I kneel to pray 
My prayer shall be for "Others". 



Chorus: 

Others, Lord, yes, others, 
Let this my motto be, 
Help me to live for others 
That I may live like Thee. 

Help me in all the work I do 
To ever be sincere and true, 
And know that all I'd do for you, 
Must needs be done for — "Others". 

Let "Self" be crucified and slain, 
And buried deep, and all in vain 
May efforts be to rise again, 
Unless to live for — "Others". 

And when my work on earth is done 
And my new work in heaven's begun, 
May I forget the crown I've won, 
While thinking still of— "Others". 

This golden chain of promise with its links 
of blue for loyalty, formed a complete circle, 
carrying the 224 names of our church women. 
There are many missing links in the outer circle. 
It will be our joy and privilege in the next month 
to strengthen this outer circle, and return next 
month with the circle completed. This, Mrs. 
Bender said, will be the most inspiring meeting 
of the year, for then we turn back the pages of 
Time, that all may know of the wonderful work 
done by the Auxiliary women. 

This new office of Fellowship Chairman has 
just been created, and bids fair to become a great 
asset. The Fellowship Chairman divided the list 
of women of the Church into sections according 
to locality. These sections she sub-divided into 
groups of six, and one of each six members was 
asked to contact the other five of her group, 
inviting each to attend this meeting, and all 
meetings to follow. As a result of this contacting, 
many women who have never before attended, 
came and were greatly benefited by the spiritual 
and social "get together". 

After the singing of "Blest be the Tie" in 
which everyone was asked to join, the chain was 
broken at every blue link, and each person given 
the happy opportunity of doing some kind deed 
for those whose names were on the three links 
left in her hand. 

The Parish House had been made most attrac- 
tive with large boughs of dogwood banked in 
corners, window boxes held greens and blue lu- 
pine. Bowls and high vases were filled with 
roses, syringa and other lovely blossoms. 

From a beautifully adorned table, centered 
with a silver urn, overflowing with scarlet roses 
and purple iris, delicious punch and cake were 
served. 



MAY, 1940 



15 



KANUGA CONFERENCES 

Six Miles from Hendersonville, North Carolina 

CONFERENCE CENTER OF THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

1940 Conference Schedule 

Reireat for Women, June 10th to 13th — Cost $5.25 

Junior Conference, June 15th to 28th — Cost $19.25 

Young People's Conference. June 29th to July 12th — Cost $21.25 

Midget Camp, July 13th to 27th— Cost $17.25 

Adult Conference, July 13th to 27th — Cost $28.25. $24.25 

College Conference, July 13th to 27th — Cost $28.25, $24.25 

Laymen's Conference, July 26th to 28th — Cost $4.25 

Clergy School, July 15th to 27th— Cost $23.25, $14.25 

GUEST PERIOD. July 27th to September 3rd 

Inn, with annexes connected by covered way, and 39 cottages 

Central Dining Room in Inn 

Beautiful lake, pavilion, tennis courts, riding horses, golf course. 

THE IDEAL SPOT FOR A VACATION 

Also Boy's Camp in connection with the Guest Period, Vt mile from Inn. 
August 3rd to 31st — Cost $75.00 

For further information write: The REV. A. RUFUS MORGAN 
Wheat and Holly Streets, Columbia, S. C. 

(After June 10th, Address — Kanuga Lake, Hendersonville, N. C.) 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 
GENERAL CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1. 1940 TO DECEMBER 31. 1940 
CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



Diocesan 
Needs 
1940 
Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $ 350.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 150.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 2,000.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1,000.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 100.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 1,500.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 100.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 2,000.00 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 100.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 200.00 

Southport, St. Philip's 175.00 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 40.00 

Whiteville, Grace Church 100.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 600.00 

Wilmington, St. James' 10,000.00 

Wilmington, St. John's 2,200.00 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 1,500.00 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


May 16th 


1940 


1940 


$ 300.00 


$ 150.00 


150.00 


75.00 


2,000.00 


613.28 


1,100.00 


362.15 


100.00 


32.00 


1,500.00 


450.00 


60.00 


18.57 


2,033.60 


734.14 


100.00 


10.00 


150.00 




175.00 


89.95 


40.00 


21.40 


60.00 


30.07 


400.00 


195.41 


10,000.00 


3,430.77 


2,000.00 


974.49 


1,500.00 


300. 0U 



Diocesan 
Needs 
1940 
Oraanized Missions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's $ 30.00 

Campbellton, St. Philip-Apostle 40.00 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 30.00 

North West. All Soul's 10.00 

Pikeville, St. George's 50.00 

Trenton, Grace Church 25.00 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 20.00 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 40.00 

Unorganized Missions 

Calabash, St. Andrew's 

Polloksville, Mission 5.00 

Tar Landing, Mission 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 75.00 

Total $22,440.00 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


May 16th 


1940 


1940 


$ 30.00 


$ 2.00 


40.00 


20.00 


30.00 


13.18 


10.00 


5.00 


50.00 




25.00 


16.10 


20.00 


10.00 


40.00 


11.27 




11.27 


5.00 




75.00 


55.00 



$21,993.60 $ 7,619.78 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



Parishes 

Aurora, HoV/ Cross 300.00 300.00 

Ayden, St. James' 75.00 75.00 

Bath, St. Thomas' 75.00 75.00 

Belhaven, St. James' 250.00 250.00 

Bonnerton, St. John's 100.00 50.00 

Chocowinitv, Trinity 125.00 125.00 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 260.00 200.00 

Creswell, St. David's 300.00 300.00 

Edenton, St. Paul's 1,500.00 1,200.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 1,500.00 1,009.20 

Farmville, Emmanuel 300.00 300.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 200.00 120.00 

G'e°nville, St. Paul's 1,500.00 825.77 

Grifton, St. John's 100.00 100.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 100.00 100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 400.00 400.00 

Jessama, Zion 125.00 125.00 

Lake Landing, St. George's 100.00 100.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church 300.00 300.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 100.00 60.00 

Washington, St. Peter's 2,000.00 2,000.00 

Williamston, Advent 250.00 250.00 

CONVOCATION 
Parishes 

Fayetteville. St. Joseph's $ 150.00 150.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400.00 400.00 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 150.00 150.00 

Organized Missions 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 50.00 50.00 

Edenton, St. John the Evangelist .... 125.00 125.00 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's ! 25.00 25.00 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 70.00 70.00 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 85.00 85.00 

Washington, St. Paul's 75.00 75.00 



Windsor, St. Thomas' 

27.31 Winton, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 

7.85 
58.63 Organized Missions 

7.05 Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

25.02 Roxobel, St. Mark's 

400.00 Sladesville, St. John's 

559.63 Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

17.00 Swan Quarter, Calvary 

445.51 Winterville, St. Luke's 

3.61 Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

200.00 Unorganized Missions 

31.66 Avoca, Holy Innocents' 

5.45 

90.00 Parochial Missions 

22.80 Creswell, Galilee Mission 

810.48 

125.50 Total $11,230.00 

OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 

Unomanized Missions 

13.83 Aurora, St. Jude's 20.00 

131.00 Beaufort, St. Clement's 40.00 

84.00 Farmville, St. Timothy's 20.00 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 30.00 

Haddock's X-Roads, St. Stephen's .. 35.00 

11.02 Roper, St. Ann's 25.00 

25.00 Wilmington, Brooklyn Mission 30.00 

8.00 

15.00 Total $ 1,330.00 

3.50 

Grand Total $35,000.00 



250.00 


250.00 
100.00 
200.00 

100.00 
10.00 
40.00 

100.00 
10.00 

125.00 

20.00 
150.00 
40.00 

50.00 

25.00 


20.00 


100.00 


17.79 


200.00 


62.50 


100.00 


22.98 


10.00 




40.00 


36.45 


100.00 


31.00 


10.00 




125.00 




50.00 




20.00 




150.00 


80.00 


40.00 


40.00 


50.00 


2.00 


25.00 









$ 9,434.97 $ 3,150.22 



20.00 


5.22 


45.00 


12.00 


20.00 




30.00 


5.00 


30.00 




25.00 


15.00 


30.00 


9.50 


$ 1,330.00 $ 


338.07 



$32,808.57 $11,108.07 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



+ 



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SCHOOL 

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Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

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RECTOR 



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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 

of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 

Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 

Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 

Wilmington, N. C. 






INVESTMENTS ! 



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Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
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A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
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A College Preparatory Department, Training School fur Nurses 
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the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment, Christian influences 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 






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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
Wilmington, N. C. 



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Wilmington, N. C. 

Phone 84 






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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter 
continue her education in a Church school. 

MRS. ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, A. M. 

President 

Saint Mary's offers the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades 
of High School and 2 years College work. All acade- 
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General charge $700 including tuition In Art, Expres- 
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Gym and Field sports. Horseback Riding, Golf, 
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Catalogue and Book of Views 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



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The Executive Committee of the Y. P. S. L., Elected 

dining the meeting of the Annual Convention, Camp 

Leach, Washington, N. C, June 14 - 16, 1940 





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JUNE 






1940 




THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



Published Monthly except July and August at 
507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Editor 

REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 

Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 

TRAINING INSTITUTE FOR CHURCH SCHOOL 
AND WOMAN'S AUXILIARY WORKERS 



Camp Leach, Washington, N. C, July 29th 
to August 3rd 



For several years we in the Diocese of East 
Carolina have felt the need of a training institute 
for Church School and Woman's Auxiliary work- 
ers such as is conducted at Kanuga, Shrine Mont, 
and Sewanee. It is not that these institutes are 
not all that they are expected to be, but that 
because of the great distance, so few from our 
own Diocese are able to attend. Now, at long 
last, we are thrilled to be able to announce to 
you that our dreams have materialized, and that 
there is to be at Camp Leach, within easy reach 
of every one of us, such an institute, which we 
have called The Adult Conference, from July 29th 
to August 3rd, at a cost of $5.00 per camper, 
plus $1.00 registration fee. 

There are two reasons why we have not gone 
outside the Diocese for our faculty at the Insti- 
tute. First, since we are still in the experimental 
stage, we have no funds to secure teachers from 
the Church Missions House or anywhere else, re- 
gardless of how splendid they may be. And, 
second, we have within the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina some of the foremost leaders in the Church's 
work. We are fortunate to be able to announce 
that the following persons will teach courses at 
our Woman's Auxiliary Institute: 

Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan, of Wilmington, mem- 
ber-at-large of the National Executive Board, and 



past president of our Diocese and the Province 
of Sewanee, will teach a course called "Women in 
the Life of the Church." Mrs. W. O. S. Suther- 
land, also of Wilmington, and president of the 
Convocation of Wilmington, will teach a course 
on "The Missionary Program of the Church." 
We may take one or both of these excellent 
courses, and choose others from the several de- 
votional and Church School courses offered. A 
splendid, well rounded program of work and play 
has been arranged for the Conference. 

This Conference will be of benefit to three 
types of people: First, persons who are new in 
Auxiliary work, or the Church, (and therefore 
new to both), who feel the need of a deeper know- 
ledge of the workings of the Church and the Aux- 
iliary. Second, those Auxiliary members who 
know the inside machinery of the Church and 
Auxiliary, and wish to gain inspiration and new 
ideas. Third, those persons who will go simply 
because this institute is being held and they 
wish to be there. The capacity of the camp is 
one hundred campers and twenty-five staff mem- 
bers. If each Auxiliary branch (there are sixty- 
five or more) would send at least one member 
to the Conference, then the Conference and the 
work of those behind it will have been justified. 

There is something about Camp Leach that 
gets deep into your being and gives you inspira- 
tion to carry on through the coming year, and 
then takes you back the next summer. I beg 
you — come, be inspired, (by the leaders and that 
Camp Leach spirit that every East Carolina girl 
and boy has) and take Camp Leach to your hearts. 
When you have done so, then our Adult Confer- 
ence will have been a success and will become an 
annual affair. 

Hoping to see you at Camp Leach on July 
29th, I am 

Faithfully yours, 

SUSAN CAPEHART HARDY, 

Director for Woman's Auxiliary 



FRIENDLY HALL NEWS 



At a recent meeting at Friendly Hall, in Green- 
ville, the following college students were elected 
to serve as officers for the school year of 1940- 
1941: 

Irene Mitcham, President; Bessie Faye Hunt, 
Vice President ; Christine Trippe, Secretary ; Nan- 
cy Darden, Treasurer; Joyce Dunham, Publicity 
Chairman; Shirley Johnson, Supply Chairman; 
Nina Gatling, Chairman of Social Service ; Virginia 
Elam, Chairman of United Thank Offering. 

Respectfully yours, 

JOYCE DUNHAM, 
Publicity Chairman. 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C, JUNE, 1940 



NUMBER 6 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



In my letter in the May issue of The Mission 
Herald I gave an account of my activities for the 
first week of that month. 

On Friday, May the tenth, I made an address 
at the Confederate Memorial Service in Oakdale 
Cemetery, Wilmington, at 4:00 P. M. 

On the afternoon of the eleventh I confirmed 
a sick man, presented by the Rev. Worth Wicker, 
at his home in Stokes, N. C. 

On Sunday, the twelfth, at 11:00 A. M., I 
preached and confirmed five persons, presented 
by the Rev. Arthur J. Mackie, in St. James' 
Church, Belhaven. In the afternoon at 3:00 
o'clock, I preached and confirmed two persons 
presented by the Rev. John B. Brown, in St. Ma- 
ry's Church, Belhaven. At 4:30 that same after- 
noon, I preached in St. Matthew's Church, Yeates- 
ville. In the evening at 8:00 o'clock I preached 
and confirmed four persons, presented by the 
Rev. John B. Brown in St. Paul's Church, Wash- 
ington. 

On the night of the fourteenth, I made an ad- 
dress on "Religion and World Conditions" in St. 
John's Lodge, Wilmington. 

On Thursday the sixteenth, I celebrated Holy 
Communion at 10:00, conducted Noonday prayers 
and made an address at the District Meeting of 
the Woman's Auxiliary in St. Philip's Church, 
Southport. 

On Friday, the seventeenth, at 4:00 P. M., I 
made an address in connection with the Hospital 
Day Celebration at the Hospital of the Good 
Shepherd, in New Bern. At this service portraits 
of two good friends of the Hospital, Rev. Walter 
R. Noe and Rev. Charles E. Williams, were un- 
veiled. 

On Sunday the nineteenth, at 11:00 A. M., I 
dedicated two Eucharistic candlesticks, preached, 
confirmed two persons presented by the Rev. J. 
R. Rountree, and celebrated Holy Communion in 
Holy Innocents' Church, Lenoir County. Follow- 
ing this service, the large congregation enjoyed 
the usual annual "Bishop's Visit" dinner, on the 
grounds of the Church. On the evening of the 
nineteenth, I preached in Grace Church, Tren- 
ton. 

On Monday the twentieth at 6:30 P. M., I in- 
stalled the new officers of the Students Woman's 
Auxiliary in St. Paul's Church, Greenville. At 
7:30 that evening in Friendly Hall, I attended the 
annual Bishop's Banquet and made an address. 



The work at Friendly Hall, under the direction 
of Mrs. Picklesimer, has gone forward splendidly 
along all helpful lines during the past year. 

On Tuesday, the twenty-first, at 10:30 A. M., 
in St. Cyprian's Church, New Bern, I ordained 
Charles M. Johnson and Vernon Earl Artis to the 
Diaconate, and celebrated Holy Communion. The 
Ordination Sermon was preached by the Rev. 
Worth Wicker, and the candidates were presented 
by the Rev. Robert I. Johnson. We welcome these 
two fine young men to the ranks of the East 
Carolina clergy. 

On Thursday evening, the twenty-third, I at- 
tended an interesting supper meeting of St. John's 
Men's Club, Wilmington. 

On Friday evening, the twenty-fourth, I made 
an address at the largely attended and inspiring 
Parish Supper meeting in St. Paul's Parish House, 
Edenton. 

On Saturday evening, the twenty-fifth, I had 
an informal meeting with the Rector and a group 
of the men of Holy Trinity Parish, Hertford, at 
which time plans for the formation of a Men's 
Club were discussed. 

On Sunday, the twenty-sixth, I preached and 
confirmed one person, presented by the Rev. E. 
T. Jillson, in Holy Trinity Church, Hertford. In 
the afternoon I preached in the Community 
House, Tyner, where the Rev. C. A. Ashby is now 
holding regular services. 

On the evening of the twenty-sixth, I preached, 
and confirmed four persons presented by the Rev. 
C. A. Ashby in St. Paul's Church, Edenton. 

On Monday, the twenty-seventh, I confirmed 
one person, presented by the Rev. E. T. Jillson, 
and made an address in St. Mary's Church, Gates- 
ville. 

At 3.30 in the afternoon, I addressed the com- 
bined Auxiliaries of Christ Church, New Bern, 
and confirmed two persons presented by the Rev' 
C. E. Williams. 

On Tuesday, the twenty-eighth, I attended a 
meeting of the Board of Trustees of St. Mary's 
School. Raleigh. 

On Wednesday, the twenty-ninth, I attended 
the Commencement exercises and meeting of 
the Board of Trustees of St. Augustine's Col- 
lege, Raleigh. 

On Sunday, June second, I preached the bac- 
calaureate sermon at Roanoke College, Salem, 
Virginia. 

On Tuesday, the fourth, I made the commence- 
ment address at Stuart Hall, Staunton, Virginia 

On Wednesday, the fifth, I attended a meeting 



THE MISSION HERALD 



of the Board of Trustees of the Theological Sem- 
inary of Virginia in the morning and preached 
the Annual Missionary Sermon in the Seminary 
Chapel that night. 

On Wednesday, June twelfth, I attended a 
meeting of the Board of Managers of the Thomp- 
son Orphanage in Charlotte. 

From Friday, the fourteenth through the mor- 
ning service on Sunday, the sixteenth, I was in 
attendance upon the splendid Annual Convention 
of the Y. P. S. L. at Camp Leach. At the clos- 
ing service I preached and awarded the pennants 
and Bishop's Shield. 

On the afternoon of the sixteenth I made one 
of the addresses at the memorial service to the 
late Father James Manley in the High School 
Auditorium, Wilmington. 

On Monday evening, the seventeenth, I made 
an address at the opening Vesper Service of the 
Senior Camp at Camp Leach. 

On Tuesday, the eighteenth, I preached at the 
opening service of the Convocation of Colored 
Church Workers of the Diocese in St. Mark's, 
Wilmington. 

In closing, may I urge you to join with me each 
day at noon in earnest prayer that God may use 
us in bringing peace to our torn and troubled 
world. May we realize that we must be better 
Christians than we have ever been before if we 
are to play our part in building a new and better 
world. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY NEWS 



July Calendar 

St. James 25 



UNITED THANK OFFERING, SPRING 1940 



When the suggestion came from National Coun- 
cil that our United Thank Offering Service be 
changed from a week day service when only the 
women participated in it, to an 11 o'clock Sunday 
service, at which time the Rector should talk on 
this subject, we were very uncertain as to the ad- 
visability of this move. However, feeling that as 
in any army the soldiers must obey orders, we, 
the would-be Christian soldiers of the Church's 
army in New Bern, accepted the order, and have 
since 1938 presented our United Thank Offering 
on Sunday at the 11 o'clock service. 

Our Rector, Mr. Charles Williams, has gra- 
ciously cooperated with us and from time to time 
has given up his sermon time to a discussion of 



the history of the Offering, what it is and what it 
does. 

On Sunday, April 28th, past, our Diocesan 
Custodian, Mrs. Frank Fagan, was invited to be 
the speaker on the occasion of the 1940 Spring 
Presentation, and after a little time to decide if 
she could be brave enough to talk before the whole 
congregation of Christ Church at an eleven o'clock 
service, she prayerfully accepted and gave us an 
impressive talk on "What the Little Blue Box can 
Mean to You." 

After trying out this new plan thoroughly as 
we have, now having had five presentations of the 
Offering since it was begun, we feel that it is a 
change for the larger growth of the Offering, be- 
cause it gives many of our women who work and 
could not be present during the week a chance to 
attend this wonderful service when our gifts are 
consecrated to the service of others ; it enables 
many who never hear about the Offering through 
the Auxiliary and chapter programs to hear about 
it at this time, and it brings to the attention of 
the membership of the whole parish what the 
women of the Church are doing for women 
throughout the world. 

There are many ways in which this privilege of 
expressing our thankfulness, by sharing with 
others, can be brought to the minds of our wom- 
en. From the Church Missions House may be ob- 
tained leaflets, plays, conversations and skits of 
many different kinds and all of these are helpful 
when used in programs, but there is nothing that 
impresses one like the actual experience of an- 
other, and so, as we see it there is nothing that 
can take the place of the Custodians' personal call 
on the members, telling them of the benefits 
which may be derived from the constant and 
faithful use of the Little Blue Box, and asking 
them for their prayers and their help in working 
to make the United Thank Offering a telling influ- 
ence in the lives of ?11 of our women. 
MRS. G. H. ROBERTS, 

United Thank Offering Custodian, 



SEWANEE SUMMER SCHOOL OFFERS 
VARIETY OF COURSES 



Sewanee Summer Training School courses cov- 
ering Woman's Auxiliary, Christian Education, 
Social Relations and Young People's Work have 
been announced by the Rev. Girault M. Jones, 
New Orleans, director of the School. Dates for 
the school are August 1 to 15. 

Held in the picturesque setting of the Univer- 
sity of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee, the school 
divides into four "Schools of Interest", each of 
which concentrates on a particular field of study. 



JUNE, 1940 



MEETING OF ELEVENTH DISTRICT OF 
WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



The District meeting of the Woman's Auxil- 
iary of the Eleventh District met in St. John's 
Church, Fayetteville, May 8th, at 10:30 o'clock, 
Mrs. J. C. Jackson, District Chairman, presiding. 

Holy Communion was celebrated by the Rev. 
W. Tate Young, assisted by Dr. B. F. Huske. 

Cordial greetings were extended by the Rev. Mr. 
Young and Miss Irene Rowe, of Lumberton, re- 
sponded, expressing appreciation of the hospitable 
welcome they were receiving. 

The Secretary called the roll and thirty-one 
representatives answered. 

Mrs. Holmes and Mrs. S. R. Clary were appoint- 
ed to serve on the Courtesy Committee. 

Mrs. Jackson expressed words of welcome and 
appreciation. She rejoiced over the recovery of 
Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith who has been so ill, and was 
happy she could be present at the meeting. 

Reports were heard from Trinity Church, Lum- 
berton, St. Philip's and St. John's, Fayetteville, 
and the work of these Auxiliaries has been most 
outstanding. 

Mrs. W. 0. S. Sutherland, President of the Con- 
vocation of Wilmington, gave a most informative 
and inspiring talk on the work, and on the Tri- 
ennial Meeting in Kansas City in 1940. She urged 
that we join our prayer, study and meditations 
so we will be ready to grasp opportunities offered 
us. 

Bishop Darst gave a record of work of the Gen- 
eral Church, and emphasized an appeal for more 
sacrificial giving. He had noonday prayers and 
following he gave a most inspiring message. He 
expressed a desire for forming small spiritual 
groups everywhere in the Diocese. There must 
be a widening and deepening of our prayer life. 
The slogan of the Church must be "Come." Christ 
is out there in the broken homes and he says 
"Come." God help us to hear the call. 

The President of the Diocese of East Carolina, 
Mrs. Louis J. Poisson, gave an interesting talk. 
She told of the Institute to be held this summer 
and urged members to send delegates. 

Our United Thank Offering Custodian, Mrs. 
Frank Fagan, was most inspiring. She brought 
the lovely scrap book made by a member of the 
New Bern Auxiliary. It was beautiful and I trust 
others will follow this excellent example. May 
we realize, she said, how little we earn and how 
much we receive. 

Mr?. C. F. Green, Field Department Chairman, 
gave a very informative discussion on the field 



work. She gave hand books for use by the Par- 
ishes. She emphasized — We must know what our 
Church Program is. 

Mrs. Holmes made the report of the Courtesy 
Committee, after which Rev. John R. Tolar gave 
the benediction. 

At one o'clock the meeting adjourned for a 
lovely luncheon. 



ST. PAUL'S, EDENTON 



The Woman's Auxiliary has been very active 
under our new President, Mrs. R. H. Bachman, 
and many of our winter meetings were held in 
her home. We are now active in all five fields of 
service. 

During Lent a sewing circle was formed under 
the leadership of Mrs. Augustus Moore. This 
circle met on each Wednesday during Lent and 
completed forty-nine garments. It was found 
that by making the clothes instead of purchasing 
ready-made garments, better workmanship and 
superior material could be had for a smaller 
amount of money. Five layettes were sent to the 
Good Shepherd Hospital in New Bern, and other 
clothes sent to Miss Sally Dean, who had made 
such an enlightening talk to the Auxiliary earlier 
in the year. Mrs. Fred Wood has the remainder of 
the clothes to include in her box work for the 
Thompson Orphanage. 

On Friday, May 24, Bishop Darst made an 
excellent address at a congregational supper held 
at the Parish House. As always, St. Paul's was 
proud and happy to have this most honored guest. 
The series of Church suppers held by the differ- 
ent circles of the Auxiliary have proved to be a 
most pleasant and profitable means of adding to 
our treasury. The Auxiliary has served luncheon 
each Thursday for the Rotary Club also. 

At the April meeting of the Auxiliary Mrs. 
C. T. Sawyer of Windsor, talked to us about the 
Thank Offering. She referred to the interesting 
fact that ours is the only Parish in the Diocese 
that has not missed an offering since 1901. Mrs. 
Harry Walker gave us much inspiration in her 
talk at the May meeting, and also gave some good 
advice to chairmen of committees, wbom she ad- 
vised to keep an accurate account of their ivork 
during the year, in order to have their annual 
report in good order. The Auxiliary will stand 
adjourned during the summer months, but trust 
that we will take up the work with ardor in the 
autumn. 

ANNE KEMP WOOD, 

Publicity Chairman. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



WOMEN FORM A READING CHAIN 



Women of the Fourth Province have been asked 
by the Provincial Field Department of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary to join a "Brother Lawrence 
Chain" by reading and passing on a copy of Broth- 
er Lawrence's "The Practice of the Presence of 
God." The head of a branch will start a copy, 
reading it, writing her name and the date, and 
passing it on. At the end of the year a report 
will be made of the number who have read each 
copy. — From the Educational Reporter, March 
1940. 

The following article "Everyday Living" by 
Joseph Fort, Newton is taken from "The Church- 
man" May 15th, 1940. 

"My reference some time ago to a tiny book 
called The Practice of the Presence of God, has 
brought me a shower of letters. They want to 
know who wrote it and where they can get it. No 
wonder; it is one of the little classics which we 
owe to the long ago, speaking in a calm, clear voice 
of the things that are most worthwhile, giving 
guidance in the high art of living. Written 250 
years ago, it is made up of four conversations and 
fifteen letters by Nicholas Herman, of Lorraine, 
who was admitted as a lay brother in a communi- 
ty of the Carmelites at Paris, in 1666. He was 
afterwards known as "Brother Lawrence." 

The last letter was written two days before he 
took to his bed, at eighty. He died in February, 
1691, and the letters were given to the world by 
his friends the following year. The date of such 
a book does not matter. It is as fresh today as a 
spring morning. 

Brother Lawrence was first a dishwasher, then 
the cook, for the community — being a man of 
lowly birth, his life was devoted to lowly service; 
and he hated the kind of work he had to do. 

Yet he learned a secret, almost too simple to be 
found out — how to think of himself, his work, his 
friends as always in the presence of God. He 
practiced that secret, day and night, until it be- 
came the habit of his life, and he tells us what it 
meant to him ; "I renounced for the love of God 
everything that was not He; and I began as if 
there was none but He and I in the world. Thus 
everything, even the smallest, meanest duty was 
done as if for God Himself, and under His eye." 

Practice of the Presence of God, "Brother Law- 
rence" may be gotten from Morehouse, 14 E. 41st 
Street, New York, 40 cents per copy. 

It is suggested that each Auxiliary in the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina try to cooperate with this 
Provincial reading chain, particularly during the 
summer months. 



Please send a report of your efforts to your Dio- 
cese Field Department Chairman, Mrs. Charles F. 
Green, 1312 Grace Street, Wilmington, N. C, 
so that she may in turn report to the Provincial 
Department. 



MRS. H. C. SELBY NAMED CHAIRMAN 



The Woman's Auxiliary of the Tenth District 
of the Diocese of East Carolina met at St. Ste- 
phen's Episcopal Church with Mrs. O. L. McCullen 
of Faison presiding and with forty members pres- 
ent. 

Holy Communion was celebrated at 10:30 with 
the Rev. John C. Grainger officiating, after which 
Mrs. William H. Smith welcomed the visitors to 
St. Stephen's, and Mrs. F. B. Johnson of Clinton, 
graciously responded. The reports of the work 
of the various auxiliaries in the district indicated 
that their activities had included study, worship 
and service at home and in the mission field. 

Mrs. W. O. S. Sutherland, president of the Con- 
vocation of Wilmington, told of the coming Trien- 
nial meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary, which 
will be held this year in Kansas City. This is not 
only the climax of the work of the Auxiliary for 
the past three years, but at the same time the 
beginning of a new period. 

Reports were given by Mrs. C. F. Green of Wil- 
mington, field secretary; Mrs. Frank Fagan of 
New Bern, formerly of Goldsboro, United Thank 
Offering Custodian ; and Mrs. J. E. F. Hicks of this 
city, member of the diocesan board of Christian 
Social Relations, and a report was read from Mrs. 
Sidney Ward of Plymouth, Chairman of the 
Church Periodical Club, who was unable to be pres- 
ent. It was announced that Mrs. Ashley T. St. 
Amand, of Wilmington, had won the scholarship 
to Kanuga with her essay "Evangelism First — 
Why?" 

Mrs. Louis Poisson of Wilmington, Diocesan 
President, spoke first of the purpose of the dis- 
trict meetings, which she said enabled neighbor- 
ing parishes to share common interests and com- 
mon problems, then of the summer conference at 
Kanuga, and last of the Diocese of East Carolina's 
new project, the Church School and Woman's 
Auxiliary Training Course to be offered for the 
first time at Camp Leach this summer during the 
week of July 29th to August 3rd. 

Mrs. W. I. Thompson of Faison gave an invita- 
tion to the meeting for next year. Mrs. H. C. Sel- 
by of this city was elected Chairman and Mrs. 
Cooper Person of Pikeville, Secretary, for the com- 
ing two years. A course luncheon was served to 
the women of the Auxiliary at the Hotel Golds- 
boro. 



JUNE, 1940 



"EVANGELISM FIRST— WHY?" 



By Miss Julia Clyde Stone of Christ Church, 
Hope Mills 



Editor's note: This paper won third place in 
the contest sponsored by the Woman's Auxiliary 
of the Diocese. 

"Evangelism," — a zeal for spreading the gos- 
pel everywhere, — is perhaps the most thrilling 
and joyful of all other subjects. It means the 
giving of ourselves for service to God, with no 
other purpose than to win souls for Him. 

We say an Evangelist is a preacher of the Word. 
In olden times an evangelist was called a "bearer 
of glad tidings." Today, as then, evangelism 
means the zeal of bearing glad tidings. It means 
tidings of peace, of a dying Saviour's love, and 
Faith in the risen Christ. 

Jesus, the great Evangelist, after his baptism 
heard the voice of God saying, "This is my beloved 
Son." The period of preparation was over and 
now had come the time for His mission. He did 
not go immediately to Jerusalem or some great 
city to begin his work, but he went first into the 
wilderness to fast and meditate with God. The 
customs of the day He did not follow closely for 
He made it plain He had come to save the whole 
world, — all who would "believe." He went every 
where preaching, teaching and performing mira- 
cles. He did not heal only those who came to him 
but he went out and looked for others. 

In preparing for His Ascension into Heaven, He 
told the apostles whom He had chosen to carry on 
His work to wait for the promise of the Father. 
He said, "Ye shall be witnesses unto me, both in 
Jerusalem, and in all Judea, and in Samaria, and 
unto the uttermost parts of the earth." On the 
day of Pentecost they were filled with the Holy 
Ghost, and then they began to speak with other 
tongues, and they went out and began to preach. 
The result was the organizing of the Church. 
Like Jesus, they went everywhere teaching and 
preaching. They gave to the people a Message 
and taught them to believe on the Lord, to be 
baptized and be a witness. Many did believe, 
and numbers were added daily to the Church. 
The Book of the Acts tells how rapidly the Church 
grew from its small beginning in Jerusalem. 

The work of these early apostles has continued 
down through the years, until it has reached all 
over the world. Many changes have been made 
since that first beginning. Each generation has 
contributed to the services of the Church, but 



evangelism has not changed. Religion has not 
changed. As they needed evangelism first, then, 
so it must occupy first place now, if the Church 
is to go forward. It is through preaching and 
teaching of the Word that men have learned of 
God. So this then, is the mission of the Church. 
To present the true knowledge of God to a weary 
world. 

The Church's first need is for men to preach 
with so much earnestness and sincerity that it will 
inspire their hearers as the apostles did of old. 
To give to the world a real message that will reach 
through to the hearts of men and will fill them 
with a new desire to be about their father's bus- 
iness. 

The ministers alone cannot do all the work. 
Laymen are needed to labor in the harvest. Men 
who have studied the word to go back to the mercy 
seat in meekness and humility to rid themselves of 
sin. To reconsecrate their lives to Him and to 
ask, "Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?" Then 
having found the Christ in their own lives "walk 
forth with perfect faith in the divine power and 
love of God. To show others by their lives the 
path which leads to Life Eternal." 

Just the mere preaching of the Word is not 
sufficient. It is through prayer, preparation and 
personal work that souls are won to Christ. Each 
of us have certain talents. One may be greater 
than another, but God wants us in His service. 
Soldiers of the Cross of Christ to march forth with 
the comfort of His promises, knowing He will not 
forget. To show Christ to the world by our deeds 
of mercy and to reach out a hand to our fellowmen 
in kindness, love and sympathy. 

The great need of the church today is Evangel- 
ism. The tidings of peace to a world filled with 
sin and hatred. The tidings of Faith in the power 
of our risen Lord to a world torn, distressed and 
horrified by war. 

We, as workers, should study the Forward 
Movement of the Church and renewing our Bap- 
tismal and Confirmation vows take the Cross of 
Christ and go forward. 

Christ is our Captain, and we are enlisted in 
His army. May we not be content as long as one 
soul remains outside His army. 

"Go forward Christian soldier! 

Fear not the secret foe ; 
Far more o'er thee are watching 

Than human eyes can know; 
Trust only Christ, thy Captain ; 

Cease not to watch and pray; 
Heed not the treacherous voices 

That lure thy soul astray." 



THE MISSION HERALD 



FREEDOM AND JOY AND WONDER 



D. A. McGregor 



The Department of Christian Education is re- 
sponsible for assistance in the unification, pros- 
ecution, and development of Christian Education 
in the Church. This is a very broad field. In fact, 
it covers all those activities which minister to the 
edification of God's people. It may fairly be said 
that all the work of the Church falls into two 
sections: Evangelism and Education. 

A very serious misunderstanding has been pre- 
valent which would limit the work of education to 
the one task of conducting the Church School. It 
was with a view of overcoming this grave miscon- 
ception that the National Council, in October, 
1938, changed the name of the Department to the 
Department of Christian Education. 

It is of the utmost importance the Christian 
people free themselves from two very common 
fallacies. The first of these is that Christian ed- 
ucation is for children only. It seems to be as- 
sumed that the work of education belongs to the 
years of childhood up to about twelve. It is then 
supposed that the 'teen age is an uncertain period 
when boys and girls ought to want to learn but 
for the same strange reason do not want to do so. 
Then comes adulthood, and people assume, in de- 
fiance of all the facts, that they have an adequate 
knowledge of the Christian religion and can be left 
to practice it as they will. But every pastor and 
every Christian worker is keenly aware of the ut- 
ter inadequacy of Christian knowledge and of the 
meagerness of Christian development in the life 
of the great mass of our young people. The patent 
facts before us are that we have an uninformed 
Church membership; a Church membership that 
is not trained in Christian practices and earnest 
Christian interest. The tendency toward think- 
ing that Christian education is something which 
is confined to the earlier years of life is a tenden- 
cy which is leading to a weak and anaemic Church. 

Another most serious fallacy in popular relig- 
ious thought today is that the whole work of 
Christian education can safely be left to the 
Church School, and that after boys and girls are 
put through a series of lessons then good results 
and Christian character inevitably will follow. 
This doctrine is held tenaciously all through the 
Church in defiance of all the known facts of Chris- 
tian life and development. There can never be ad- 
equate Christian education if we assume that the 
methods of the Church School are sufficient for 
the task. No matter how good a curriculum of 
studies might be developed the facts remain that 



the Church's work of training people in the Chris- 
tian life demands far more than any system of 
lessons for boys and girls. This reliance on a 
wrong understanding of education and on inade- 
quate methods of education is largely responsible 
for the weakness of the Church, for the lack of 
any real sense of message and of mission in the 
Church today. 

If the Church's work of Christian Education in 
the lives of her people is to be a success there 
will have to be a new understanding of what 
Christian Education is. We must come to realize 
that the Church School, with all of its values, is 
but a very small part of the Church's educational 
work, and we must see to it that the other neces- 
sary parts of Christian education are provided. 
We must develop a program- which will include 
every person in every parish; a program which 
will plan for the Christian training of men and 
women, as well as of boys and girls. We must 
plan for a continuance of the education of all our 
people in the application of the Gospel to the life 
of the Twentieth Century. And we must make 
the Church School one organic part of a much 
broader and larger program of the education of 
the whole parish. Further, we must broaden our 
conception of education so that it will include not 
merely learning about the Bible and the Prayer 
Book, but also learning through Christian fellow- 
ship, learning through Christian activity, and 
learning through Christian worship. The exclu- 
sion of any one of these fields from the scope of 
education wiil lead to an impoverishment of Chris- 
tian life. We suffer from that poverty today. 

The crying need of our day is for a number 
of parishes who will lead in the development of 
a parish program of Christian Education. Such 
a program will see the parish as a whole, as a liv- 
ing body which needs to be trained and nurtured 
in all activities of the Christian life. Such a pro- 
gram will recognize the fact that the men and 
women of the parish need to work, study and think 
together about the expression of the Christian 
life in all situations in which people live today, in 
family problems, in economic problems, in the 
problems of race and international relations. 
Such a program will recognize that people's lives 
are molded by the pressure of the social life in 
which they live and that therefore it is the duty 
of the Church to provide such a social environ- 
ment as will mold the lives of people in Christian 
forms. Such a program will recognize that the 
Church is essentially the family of God, and there- 
fore, the program will make many, many places 
for the coordinated activities of all ages in thought, 
in work, in discussion and social life. 



JUNE, 1940 



A modern parish program of Christian Educa- 
tion will recognize that the educational work of 
the Church is far from complete when it includes 
only methods for trying to transmit to a few boys 
and girls on Sunday morning a few facts about the 
Bible and the Prayer Book. Every study and 
every research into educational problems is show- 
ing us today that such so-called education is of 
very little worth, first because facts so taught 
are seldom remembered, and secondly, because if 
remembered, they exercise little influence on life. 
The times call for a revolution in our whole con- 
ception of Christian Education. The Christian 
development of people demands that the old- 
fashioned routine system of talking about the 
Bible and the Prayer Book be discarded as inad- 
equate and that new methods must be adopted 
which will set themselves to the training and 
nurture of developing the people of the Church in 
the whole meaning of Christian life and Christian 
faith. 

This means that the primary emphasis must be 
shifted from learning facts about the Christian 
life to sharing the fellowship of that life. It is 
more important for boys and girls and for men 
and women to have a trustworthy Christian com- 
rade and guide than to have the most perfect text- 
book ever written. It is infinitely more important 
to share in the experience of being a member of 
Christ than it is to memorize statements about 
being such a member, statements that can never 
be understood without that experience. 

The first step in Christian Education is to 
share the freedom and the joy and the wonder of 
that life. The second step is to study about the 
nature of that life, and the second step is mean- 
ingless without the first. We need to reconstruct 
our whole program of Christian Education so as 
to begin with the nurture of Christian fellowship 
and Christian trust in the life of the parish. Af- 
ter that has been realized then people will ask for 
courses about the life into which they have been 
led. Then, and only then, will such study have 
living meaning. 

It is on the basis of such a view of education 
that the Department of Christian Education of 
the National Council is trying to carry on its 
work. It is of course not the function of this de- 
partment to be the active agent in the Christian 
education of the Church. This function belongs 
to the Bishops and the Clergy. The task of this 
Department is to assist the presiding Bishop in 
the unification, development and prosecution of 
the educational work of the Church, and such uni- 
fication and development are understood by the 
Department according to the principles which 
have just been stated. 



REV. THOMAS P. NOE HONORED 



On May 17, at Chapel at the University of South 
Carolina, Rev. Thomas P. Noe, Superintendent of 
the Church Home Orphanage, was honored by the 
University with the Algernon Sydney Sullivan 
Award of the New York Southern Society. 

In the University Catalogue this statement is 
made about the award: "ALGERNON SYDNEY 
SULLIVAN AWARD. The New York Southern 
Society awards annually, through the faculty of 
the University, a medallion and certificate to one 
man and one woman of the graduating class and 
one other person who is not a student of the insti- 
tution. In the selection of the recipients, nothing 
shall be considered except the possession of such 
characteristics of heart, mind and conduct as 
evince a spirit of love for and helpfulness to other 
men and women. The purpose of the award is 
to establish a permanent reminder of the noblest 
human qualities as expressed and followed in the 
life of the first President of the Southern Society, 
Algernon Sydney Sullivan, and perpetuate his in- 
fluence not so much as an individual, but as a type 
of noble character." 

This honor is awarded to one person not a stu- 
dent of the University each year, and this award 
to Mr. Noe was greatly appreciated. The Dean's 
citation in making the award is given below: 

Award Made at Chapel Friday, May 17, 1940, To 
the Rev. Thomas P. Noe. 

Who, for more than twenty years as Superin- 
tendent and Chaplain of the Episcopal Church 
Home Orphanage of York, South Carolina, through 
his fine intelligence, his wisdom, his untiring and 
unselfish devotion, and through his long and con- 
structive work in the State has earned for that 
institution signal recognition of the Duke Foun- 
dation, has cared for the physical, mental and spir- 
itual welfare of fatherless children and made them 
useful citizens, has earned the gratitude and ad- 
miration of all those who know most about his 
unselfish labors from the mountains to the sea, 
the Faculty of the University of South Carolina 
herewith awards the Algernon Sydney Sullivan 
Medallion of the New York Southern Society. 
F. W. BRADLEY, 

Dean University of South Carolina. 



CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN 



Christ Church Auxiliary was hostess to the 
District Meeting in April, Mrs. Purser of Vance- 
boro, presiding; and the Diocesan President, Mrs. 
Poisson, gave a most interesting talk. There was 
a very good attendance at the meeting. 



l]ounq People's Service Leaque 



By Mary D. Home, Publicity Chairman 



A LETTER FOR 'YA 



Dear Leaguers: 

After such a splendid Convention anything 
that I might say about it would sound very silly. 
I can only say that I have enjoyed working with 
you this year, that I appreciate all the splendid 
help and cooperation you have shown and, that, 
thanks to you, I am looking forward to another 
year. 

Good luck to you, and God bless you all. 

MARY. 



CONVENTION 



Members of the Young People's Service League 
of the Diocese of East Carolina held their 18th 
Annual Convention at Camp Leach June 14-16, 
with St. John's League of Wilmington, as hosts. 

The Convention was boosted to an excellent 
start by a banquet at which the Rev. John Arm- 
strong Wright, Rector Christ Church, Raleigh, 
delivered the keynote address on the "Ideal of 
Service— to Give Definitely of Self and Sub- 
stance". Mr. Wright in his brief stay in our 
Diocese proved himself not only an inspiring- 
speaker but an inspiring man. Junius Council of 
St. John's, Wilmington, was toastmaster for the 
banquet. 

At the business session after the call to order 
by Hampton Noe, our President, there was a 
brief worship service, followed by the roll call 
by Parishes, and Minutes of the 1939 Conven- 
tion. Then came the reports from the Commit- 
tees on the Dispatch of Business, Credentials Com- 
mittee, Executive Committee, Resolutions Com- 
mittee, and from the Parochial Leagues. Your 
reporter has been unable to obtain an exact ac- 
count of these reports as presented, but the 
high light of the morning session was an intense 
argument that developed from the presentation 
of a resolution to this effect: 

Be it resolved that this Convention go on record 
as joining in with the Diocese of North Carolina 
in sending delegates to the Conference of Sewa- 
nee, to discuss and deside at their own discretion 
whether or not the Province of Sewanee should 
divide into three districts (the five Carolina Dio- 
ceses forming one), similar to the plan worked out 
by the Department of Religious Education. The 
original motion read in such a manner that the 
adoption of such would mean that this Diocese 
was in favor of the plan. 

Following the presentation of the resolution, 



Alice Hartley, President of the Province of Se- 
wanee, talked on the provincial side of the ques- 
tion, and Bill Gordon, President of the Diocese 
of North Carolina, gave the Diocesan side. At 
the completion of these two talks a heated argu- 
ment arose from the floor. Finally, after much 
discussion, a substitute motion was presented, 
accepted and adopted that said that we send the 
delegate to present this plan. That instead of 
doing away with any of the Provincial organi- 
zation, that we maintain our present set-up, and 
also have the three districts, but that they have 
no legislative power, and be merely discussion 
groups where the Dioceses can exchange ideas and 
discuss their problems. 

In the afternoon session reports were heard 
from the Courtesy, Finance and Nominating Com- 
mittees. The Convention accepted the report of 
the Nominating Committee, and elected the fol- 
lowing officers for the year 1940-41: President, 
Hampton Noe; First Vice President, Belle Ray 
Tillinghast ; Second Vice President, Pat Waldrop ; 
Secretary, Hallie Townes; Treasurer, Louise 
Elam; United Thank Offering Secretary, George 
Stenhouse; and Publicity Chairman, Mary D. 
Home. 

Other features of the Convention were the 
Vesper Service, at which the Rev. John Grainger, 
Rector of St. Stephen's, Goldsboro, talked fur- 
ther on the "Ideal of Service" and the impressive 
and inspiring Camp Fire Service, held by our be- 
loved Bishop, in preparation for the Corporate 
Communion on Sunday morning. This Corporate 
Communion of 122 young people and their adult 
advisers was the climax of the entire Convention. 

The Convention was closed with morning pray- 
er and sermon held at 11:00 o'clock in the out- 
door Chapel. At this time the Bishop's Shield for 
the most outstanding work in the Young Peo- 
ple's Service League was presented to St. John's 
League, Wilmington, and Pennants were awarded 
to those Leagues who had met the requirements 
of the Ten Point Standard. 

Immediately after the presentation of the ser- 
vice awards the incoming officers were installed 
by the Bishop. 



ST. JOHN'S, WILMINGTON 



The League of St. John's, together with the 
League of St. John's Mission, entertained the 
Leagues of St. James', St. Paul's, Good Shepherd, 
Wilmington, and St. Andrew's, Wrightsville, at 
St. John's Mission on May 15 at a Camp Leach Ral- 



JUNE, 1940 



11 



ly and Camp Fire. A regular Camp Fire was built 
and benches were arranged in a circle around it, 
just like at Camp Leach. Ye Prevaricating Search 
Light was read amid much hilarity, and all the 
Leagues presented a stunt. Camp songs were 
also sung heartily. After the camp fire, moving 
pictures of Camp Leach were shown, and appli- 
cation blanks were given out. Our League and 
St. John's Mission League then served punch and 
cakes to the guests. A good time was had by all 
and we feel that we spread the tidings of Camp 
Leach by this more effectively than in any other 
manner. 

We have elected our new officers for the com- 
ing year and are proud to give you their names: 
Gladys Boyd, President ; Nettie Wilson, Vice Pres- 
ident; Evelyn Rhodes, Secretary; Anna King, 
Treasurer; Ralph McCabe, Diocesan Representa- 
tive ; Annie Mae Page, Thank Offering Secretary ; 
and Graham Alderman, Program Chairman. 
These officers were elected for the meritorious 
work they have done during the past year. 

We have been working hard getting ready to 
entertain all of you as hosts to the Convention, and 
we're looking forward to meeting all of you there. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH McCABE, 

Diocesan Representative. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMINGTON 



ST. JAMES', WILMINGTON 



On June 1, 1940, the Y. P. S. L. of St. James', 
Wilmington, entertained her prayer partner, 
Calabash Mission, and St. Andrew's League, in a 
delightful weiner roast at Wrightsville Beach. 
Our League has also decided to furnish a set of 
dishes for one of the new buildings at Calabash. 

Sunday, June 2, our League had a Corporate 
Communion at eight o'clock. After the commun- 
ion our Rector, Mr. Glover, invited all the mem- 
bers to a breakfast in the Parish House. 

This is about all the activity we have had since 
the last report. 

LULA PULLIAM, Cor. Secretary. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, TOLAR HART 



On May 5th we enjoyed having St. John's, 
Fayetteville, League, join with us in a Camp Fire 
Service. We had Camp Songs, a Bible Question 
Contest, and both Leagues read their Camp 
paper. 

We have had a very successful year, and we 
are now making our plans for the summer, hop- 
ing to keep up our good attendance. 

LILLIAN MOORE. Secretary. 



Our League has been very busy lately with 
Bible and Church study, but we've also been busy 
with preparations for Convention and Camp Leach. 
That magic name seems to send everyone into a 
dither and we entered wholeheartedly into the 
arrangements. 

Our League has also been taking an active part 
in funds for the "Finland Relief Fund" and the 
"Children's Crusade for Children." We are very 
proud of our accomplishments. 

I must add that the recent Camp Fire at St. 
John's Mission was thoroughly enjoyed by all 
and it surely let us in on what Camp is really like. 

Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! Here we come 
All the young Leaguers from Wilmington, 
There are many Leaguers that we cannot reach, 
But we'll meetcha soon at Old Camp Leach. 

THELMA MINTZ. 



ST. JOHN'S, FAYETTEVILLE 



During May the Young People's Service League 
of St. John's, Fayetteville, has been having most 
interesting get-to-gether meetings with other 
young people's groups in and around Fayette- 
ville. One Sunday night we visited the Good 
Shepherd, Tolar-Hart League, and had a grand 
Campfire program. At another meeting, young 
people's groups from Fort Bragg and the First 
Presbyterian Church met with us, and our Rector, 
Mr. Young, led a most interesting discussion on 
the subject, "Liberty". At our last meeting we 
presented our Thank Offering boxes at a most 
impressive service, and admitted three new mem- 
bers to our League at a Candle-light Admission 
Service. 

As soon as school is out, we are planning a 
mission for young people, which will be held on 
four consecutive nights at the four Episcopal 
Churches around Fayetteville. Mr. Young will 
lead the discussions and we feel sure these mis- 
sion services will prove to be beneficial to all who 
take part in them. 

By the time this is printed we will all have at- 
tended the Convention at Camp Leach and enjoyed 
the hospitality of St. John's, Wilmington, and 
will have gotten that certain something you get 
at Camp that you don't get anywhere else and 
which will stimulate us to go forward with great- 
er enthusiasm for carrying out the meaning and 
work of the Young People's Service Leagues. 
MARGARET REHM, 

Diocesan Representative. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH 

WORKERS MET IN ST. MARK'S CHURCH, 

WILMINGTON, JUNE 18, 19, 1940 



WHY BISHOP WATSON BECAME AN 
EPISCOPALIAN 



PROGRAM 



Tuesday, June 18th 

7:00 P. M. Organization; appointment of com- 
mittees. 

8:00 P. M. Evening Prayer, Rev. O. E. Holder 
and Rev. V. Earl Artis. Sermon, Rt. Rev. Thomas 
C. Darst, D. D., Bishop of East Carolina. Address 
on Diocesan Relations, Rev. W. R. Noe, Execu- 
tive Secretary. 

Wednesday, June 19th 

7:00 A. M. Corporate Communion of Women. 
Rev. J. B. Brown, celebrant; Rev. C. M. Johnson, 
assistant. Presentation of United Thank Offering. 

9:30 Business, Rev. R. I. Johnson, Dean, pre- 
siding. Minutes of last meeting, Rev. J. B. Brown, 
secretary. Reports : Parishes and Missions ; 
Church Schools ; Treasurer. Dean's Annual Ad- 
dress. Discussion: "Present Needs of the Work 
in East Carolina". Leaders: Rev. S. N. Griffith; 
Rev. R. E. Bunn; Mr. Samuel Thaggard. Dis- 
cussion: "Young People's Activities." Leaders: 
Rev. Worth Wicker; Rev. O. E. Holder. Reports 
of committees. 

12:00 M. Memorial Service, conducted by Rev. 
J. S. Braithwaite. 

3:00 P. M. Meeting of Woman's Auxiliary, 
Mrs. R. I. Johnson, presiding. Opening: Greetings 
by Mrs. Latta, President of St. Mark's Branch. 
Response: Mrs. E. M. Powell, Educational Secre- 
tary. Minutes; Roll Call of Officers.; Reports 
from branches. Reports: Treasurer; United 
Thank Offering Custodian; Educational Secre- 
tary; Box Work Secretary. President's Annual 
Address. Discussion: "What Tasks Present Them- 
selves to the Women of East Carolina at this 
Time?" Leaders: Mrs. R. R. Taylor; Mrs. R. E. 
Bunn. Reports of committees. 

5:30 P. M. Dean closes Convocation. 

8:00 P. M. Women's Missionary Program. 



REV. JOHN B. BROWN WILL RETIRE 



The Rev. John B. Brown who has served in 
the Colored missionary work of the Diocese for 
the past thirty years, has retired on account of 
age. His retirement will take effect on June 15. 
He will make his home in Washington, North 
Carolina. 



A Letter From Mrs. J. B. Cranmer to Rev. 
W. E. Cox 



My Dear Mr. Cox: 

Your letter came when Dr. Cranmer was sick, 
and I had to delay my reply. 

I have never heard that Bishop Watson was 
trying to convince the Collins family of the beau- 
ty of the Presbyterian Faith, but my grandmother 
knew that, as the young tutor to the Collins sons, 
Mr. Watson was so impressed by the morning and 
evening prayer said daily in a little plantation 
Chapel on the Collins estate to which all of the 
slaves came and worshipped with the family, 
house servants and guests, that he began to study 
first the Prayer Book and then Mrs. Collins lent 
him other books about the Church. And he de- 
cided to be baptized and confirmed. Miss Wendell 
(his sister) who lived with us said that the whole 
family (Presbyterian to the nth degree) went to 
bed sick at heart at such departure from family 
traditions, but "once convinced nothing could 
turn Brother from his decision". As you may 
know the rest of the story about his finally be- 
coming a Priest and later Bishop, I will not re- 
peat it. 

I hope my letter is not so delayed as to be use- 
less and I apologize for this delay. 

With love for all three of you, 
Yours sincerely, 

MAY WEBB CRANMER. 



ST. THOMAS', WINDSOR 



The Woman's Auxiliary of St. Thomas', Wind- 
sor, met each week in Lent with Mrs. C. J. Saw- 
yer, who conducted a study class of one hour, 
using the following subjects: 

1. Bishop's Address at Wilmington. 

2. "Knowledge is Power." Under this head we 
studied the set-up of the Church, Parish, Diocese, 
Province, Nation and World. 

3. "Knowledge is Power — How shall we use it ?" 

4. "Episcopal Church, its Origin and Mission." 

5. "First Half of the Romance of the Book of 
Common Prayer." 

6. "Second Half of the Romance of the Book 
of Common Prayer." 

At each meeting there was discussion of the 
subject as well as questions to be answered to 
impress important points. 

MRS. WALTER II. BOND, 

Publicity Chairman. 



JUNE, 1940 



13 



DR. LULA M. DISOSWAY 



Paper Read Before the Woman's Auxiliary of 

Christ Church, Elizabeth City by Miss 

Minnie Albertson, May 6, 1940 



I wonder how many of you know as little about 
Geography as I knew when I first began teaching 
school, somewhere around a century ago? If so, 
your ignorance is colossal. 

I knew that China lay somewhere in Asia; my 
only vivid recollection of the country being that 
it was a large pink spot on a map, and that there 
were two rivers running through it with the de- 
lectable names — Yangtse-Kiang and Hoang-Ho. 

But when I realized that the school room walls 
would soon close around me, a school-ma'am in- 
stead of a student, why it behooved me to get busy 
and review my long forgotten knowledge of maps. 
And since becoming really interested in the work 
of the Woman's Auxilary, especially that of two 
women from our own Diocese, Miss Venetia Cox 
and Dr. Lula M. Disosway, that rose-colored spot 
on a map has become for me a wonderful country, 
peopled with wonderful, heroic human beings. 

Since 1835, when the Episcopal Church in 
America first sent missionaries to China, none 
have been more devoted, courageous and faithful 
than Dr. Lula Disosway of St. Elizabeth's Hos- 
pital, Shanghai, China. At four years of age, Dr. 
Disosway had a serious illness, and her case was 
pronounced hopeless by three doctors. Through- 
out her childhood and her young girlhood, her 
mother impressed upon her the idea that God had 
spared her life for some special work for Him. 
This conviction became the ruling idea of her 
life and while a college student, she felt a call 
to enter the missionary field as a doctor, and she 
selected a course that would lead to that goal. 

In 1926, seven years later, she offered herself 
to the Church Missionary Board, as a worker in 
their field in China, and ever since she has proved 
a devoted servant of God and a staunch friend 
to the Chinese people. 

When hospitals were first organized in China, 
it was almost impossible to secure native women 
to work as nurses. No Chinese girl of education 
or means, sheltered in her home and accustomed 
to servants, could stoop to bathing or caring for 
another, even of her own class. Such acts of 
mercy would result in loss of face. Even if she 
wished to break through the conventional bars 
that kept her virtually a prisoner in her home, 
she dared not even express such a wish. Custom 
stronger than law required her to remain idly 
in her home waiting for some middle man to 
arrange a marriage for her. 



During this era St. Elizabeth's Hospital in 
Shanghai opened its doors to the sick and dying. 
Foreign nurses did most of the nursing, but 
gradually through the efforts of the nurses' 
staff, and as education became more general, and 
through various other means, Chinese women 
began to realize that a nurse's profession was a 
noble one, and one of high standing, and that 
marriage was not the only career to which women 
in China could look. 

In the development of the emancipation of 
Chinese women, St. Elizabeth's Hospital was pre- 
pared to help. In 1914, a training school for 
nurses was opened with six nurses; and as the 
years went on, the standard was raised higher 
and higher. Today there are 105 student nurses 
and 55 graduates on the hospital staff. No woman 
entering the training school is required to be a 
Christian, but nearly all the student nurses ask 
for the rite of baptism before they graduate. 

An article written by Dr. Disosway in the 
March Spirit of Missions, 1938, gives a graphic 
account of the bombing of St. Elizabeth's in 1937, 
when the city of Shanghai underwent a terrific 
air raid and military invasion from the Japanese. 
Bombs dropping down from the skies, shells fly- 
ing, air planes whizzing, radios shrieking warn- 
ings and all the bustle and confusion of a hurried 
evacuation of a city, brought utter pandemonium 
in Shanghai, but St. Elizabeth's carried on. 

Dead and dying were brought in, gruesome 
operations performed, and babies brought into 
the world and 200 extra beds were hurriedly 
procured. This hospital was the only big mater- 
nity center remaining in the city, so the mater- 
nity department felt the war the heaviest. Babies 
were everywhere, they were being born at the 
rate of 14 to 24 a day. In August 342 arrived, 
and the number went up to 381 in September. 

But in spite of the extra and intensive strain 
of ever increasing duties, the maternity ward was 
the most enjoyable of all, as none of the horrors 
of war were there. More fortunate than other 
hospitals in Shanghai, its situation did not en- 
force evacuation; and though shells fell upon the 
roof and bombs exploded all around, not a single 
nurse faltered under the strain. 

In closing her account of those nerve racking 
days, Dr. Disosway wrote: "All around us are 
the disasters of war, but we smile and work, con- 
fident that better days are ahead and proud of 
our privilege to help China in her hour of need." 

To every public institution, schools, colleges, 
hospitals, the years bring ever increasing needs, 
and Oliver Twist's plea for "More" is echoed by 
public and private educational and charitable in- 
stitutions alike. St. Elizabeth's finds its needs 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



growing as its services become multiplied, and 
contributions for carrying on its work of mercy 
are constantly needed. Recently to the great 
joy of the medical and nurses staff and to the 
hospital committee, a new building for a mater- 
nity ward and nurses home has been provided for 
by a Chinese woman. 

In 1868, a baby was born, the child of the first 
Chinese clergyman in China, rector of the Church 
of our Saviour in Shanghai. When the baby grew 
up she attended St. Mary's Hall in the city and 
trained as a nurse, and later she entered the 
Toronto Medical School, and obtained her doctor's 
degree. Returning to Shanghai, she built up* a 
lucrative private practice and on Madame Ah Mei 
Wong's death in 1933, it was found when her 
will was read, that she had left a handsome 
portion of her large fortune to St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital for maternity work. 

St. Luke's Hospital for men and boys and St. 
Elizabeth's for women and girls, have gradually 
been growing together, and the time has come 
when, though occupying sites some distance apart, 
both being under the auspices of the Episcopal 
Church, they can be placed under a unified ad- 
ministration. A joint hospital council has just 
been effected of which two members are well 
known to many of us, Dr. A. W. Tucker who 
married a daughter of Bishop Cheshire, and 
whom some of us met at Nag's Head where he 
and his family spent a summer some years ago, 
and our own Dr. Lula Disosway. 

An article from "Epics", a publication sent out 
recently by the National Department of Missions, 
gives us an interesting glimpse of Dr. Disosway 
as she goes about her daily duties in the hospital. 

A friend of Dr. Disosway who was invited to 
tea in her apartment writes : "A little breathless, 
twenty-four hours a day, stethoscope in hand, 
she apppeared at the door of her apartment at 
exactly four o'clock. Four was the hour I had 
been invited to tea with her and there she was, 
just out of the midst of a busy clinic. 

At St. Elizabeth's Hospital for women and 
children, in the very heart of Shanghai, babies 
are born about as fast as they can be labeled 
and wrapped up. It is a howling success from 
entrance to exit. There are now about 300 beds, 
always full; there are beds even in the corridors 
and on the stair landings, and on the day we 
were there, eighty babies were born. The hos- 
pital is crowded and the need so great that the 
average stay per mother can only be four days. 

Dr. Disosway is an electrifying bundle of 
energy. I thought to myself, 'Here is a Church in 
Action, bringing healing and comfort to men and 



women at grips with suffering and death'. Rest 
seems to have no meaning for her. Making rounds 
and operating all morning, clinic all afternoon, and 
subject to call at night, not infrequently she puts 
in twenty-four hours a day." 

To the members of our local Woman's Aux- 
iliary, leading our quiet lives at home in the 
social and business life of Elizabeth City, the 
thought of this woman who is giving her life to 
our Lord and His Church should inspire us to 
give what we honestly can to the cause for which 
we have been organized, and daily to heed and 
answer the open mouth plea of our little Blue Box. 



MEETING OF NINTH DISTRICT OF WOMAN'S 
AUXILIARY 



On May the seventh the ninth district of the 
Woman's Auxiliary met in annual session in 
Gatesville, with St. Mary's Auxiliary as hostess. 
Prayers were led by the Rev. John S. Armfield, 
Mrs. W. T. Cross in her message brought greet- 
ings from St. Mary's Auxiliary. The reports were 
interesting and encouraging. The topic for con- 
sideration was Church School. Mrs. Susan Shaw 
discussed the subject, 'What it Means to an Adult 
to Attend Church School Regularly." Rev. J. S. 
Armfield, "The Value of Church School." Mrs. 
Walker, Convocational President, gave an inspir- 
ing and beneficial message. During a business 
session it was voted to send an offering to be 
used toward the Kanuga Scholarship. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 



Whereas, Mrs. Annie Boykin Lee, a beloved 
member of our Auxiliary has passed to her eter- 
nal reward, be it resolved: 

That we, her fellow members, mourn her de- 
parture and feel deeply the loss that it brings to 
us. 

That her consecrated Christian life, her de- 
voted service to God, her Church and humanity 
makes her absence sorely felt: 

That, as one who labored diligently in the cause 
she loved so well, we thank God for her life and 
the good that she has done, and for the assurance 
she now rests from her labors, and that her good 
works follow her. 

That a copy of these resolutions be sent to her 
family, forwarded to The Mission Herald and the 
county papers. 

MRS. F. B. JOHNSON, 
MRS. H. I. MORRIS 
MRS. W. H. HERRING, 

Committee. 



JUNE, 1940 



15 



REPORT ON THE DIOCESAN DEBT 



The following parishes and missions have made 
payments on the Diocesan Debt since March 29, 
1940, or since the meeting of the Debt Committee 
in Kinston, "when the Diocesan Treasurer was 
made Treasurer of the Debt Committee: 

St. Thomas', Ahoskie, $34.00; Holy Cross, Au- 
rora, $66.40; Holy Innocents', Avoca, $6.00; St. 
John's, Bonnerton, $2.00; St. Philip's, Campbell- 
ton, $52.00; St. Andrew's, Columbia, $8.00; St. 
David's, Creswell, $15.00; St. Paul's, Edenton, 
$330.00; St. John's, Edenton, $50.00; Christ 
Church, Elizabeth City, $152.11; St. Gabriel's, 
Faison, $13.00; St. Timothy's, Farmville, $38.00; 



St. Mary's, Gatesville, $26.50; St. Stephen's, 
Goldsboro, $70.91; St. Paul's, Greenville, $2.00; 
Christ Church, Hope Mills, $3.75; Holy Trinity, 
Hertford, $112.55; St. Mary's, Kinston, $76.25; 
St. Augustine's, Kinston, $6.35; Galilee Mission, 
Lake Phelps, $10.00; St. George's, Lake Landing, 
$8.00; Trinity, Lumberton, $5.00; Christ Church, 
New Bern, $84.03; Grace Church, Plymouth, 
$12.00; St. Ann's, Roper, $5.00; St. Mark's, Rox- 
obel, $32.00 ; St. Philip's, Southport, $6.00 ; Grace 
Church, Whiteville, $2.10; Wilmington, St. James', 
$1,495.96; Wilmington, St. John's, $60.40; Wil- 
mington, St. Paul's, $32.50; St. Luke's, Winter- 
ville, $7.00; Grace Church, Woodville, $18.00; 
Zion, Jessama, $2.00 ; Bishop's Parish, $6.00. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THEPARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 
GENERAL CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1. 1940 TO DECEMBER 31, 1940 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



Paid to 
June 21sl 
1940 
Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $ 150.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 75.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 663.28 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 504.34 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 32.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 450.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 33.57 

New Bern, Christ Church 864.94 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 10.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Southport, St. Philip's 98.65 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 21.40 

Whiteville, Grace Church 30.07 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 207.51 

Wilmington, St. James' 4,946.63 

Wilmington, St. John's 1,114.10 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 350.00 



Organized Missions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Campbellton. St. Philip-Apostle 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

North West. All Soui's 

Pikeville, St. George's ... 
Trenton, Grace Church, ... 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's ... 



Paid to 
June 21st 
1940 



Unorganized Missions 

Calabash, St. Andrew's 

Polloksville, Mission 

Tar Landing, Mission... 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd .. 



4.20 
20.00 
13.18 

5.00 

16.10 
10.00 



11.80 



.85 
55.00 



Total $ 9,687.62 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Greenville, St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake Landing, St. George's 

Plymouth, Grace Church 

Roper, St. Luke's 

Washington, St. Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



27.31 

7.85 
58.63 
11.30 

13.00 

25.02 

400.00 

612.03 

19.00 

508.82 

3.61 

200.00 
31.65 
15.45 

125.00 
25.40 

977.15 

125.50 



Windsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Sain.s' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's ... 



Unorganized Missions 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 



Parochial Missions 

Creswell, Galilee Mission 



20.00 

17.79 

112.50 



22.98 



36.45 
31.00 



90.00 
40.00 



2.00 



Total $ 3,559.45 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's... 
Wilmington, St. Mark's .... 



Organized Missions 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 

Edenton, St. John the Evangelist 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Washington, St. Paul's 



13.83 

131.00 

88.00 



11.02 
65.00 
16.03 
15.00 
9.89 
20.00 



Unorgtnized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Farmville, St. Timothy's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X-Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, Brooklyn Mission 



5.22 
12.00 



5.00 



15.00 
9.50 



Total ? 41649 



Grand Total $ 13 



663.56 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



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SCHOOL 

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Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 

of East CaroLna 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 

Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 

Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 

Wilmington, N. C. 

£ , , , , „ — , „ — „„„„_„_„„_ 

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ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A lour year accredited Collate Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and li. S.. including I're-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State Hiyh School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences 
For Catalog and information write — 



ST. 



The Registrar 
AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. 



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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
W.lmingion, N. C. 



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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter 
continue her education in a Church school. 

MRS. ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, A. M. 

Presid Tnt 

Saint Mary's offers the 10th. 11th, and 12th grades 
of High School and 2 years College work. All acade- 
mic courses fully accredited by Southern Association. 
General charge $700 including tu lion In Art, Expres 
sion, Home Economics, Music. 

Gym and Field sports, Horseback Riding, Golf, 
Tennis, 20 acre campus and Indoor Tiled Pool. 

Catalogue and Book of Views 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



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Library, u. »• *• 
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NEW BEGINNINGS 



Autumn is the time for new beginning's. The children go back to 
school and Sunday School. The vacation season is over. Business offices 
settle down to their usual routine. Normal Church activities start up 
again. 

This is General Convention year — always an important time in the life 
of the Church. This year General Convention will have a number of im- 
portant matters to discuss and grave decisions affecting future policy will 
have to be made. Chief among these is the part that our Church can play in 
the changing world around us and the new responsibilities thrust upon us by 
the repercussions of the war. 

Since it is a time of new beginnings, it is an appropriate time for every 
individual Churchman to consider afresh his own spiritual condition. Good 
resolutions do not have to be confined to New Years or Lent. September 
is also an appropriate time for resolutions to be kept throughout the coming 
year. One of the best ways for the Churchman to brush up on his religious 
status and take spiritual inventory, so to speak, is to read over carefully and 
prayerfully the Offices of Instruction to be found on pages 283 to 295 of the 
Prayer Book. And one of the best foundations for a good resolution is to be 
found in those Offices, namely, the following question and answer: 

"What is your bounden duty as a member of the Church?" 

"My bounden duty is to follow Christ, to worship God every Sunday in 
His Church; and to work and pray and give for the spread of His kingdom." 

There is the base not only for a good resolution, but for a continuing 
rule of life for the Christian layman. — Layman's Magazine. 



o 

n 



SEPTEMBER 






1940 




THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



Published Monthly except July and August at 
507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 
Associate Editor 
REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 
Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 



GENERAL CONVENTION WILL MEET IN 
KANSAS CITY, MO., OCTOBER 9-24, 1940 



Kansas City, Mo. — More than 5,000 persons 
are expected to be present at the mass meeting 
here the night of October 10, when the amount 
of the United Thank Offering of the women of the 
Episcopal Church is announced. It is hoped the 
offering will reach $1,000,000, as it has some times 
in the past. 

The mass meeting will be a colorful affair. Mis- 
sionaries from China, Japan, Southern Brazil, 
Alaska, Panama Canal Zone, Cuba, Puerto Rico, 
the Philippine Islands, the Hawaiian Islands, Haiti, 
the Dominican Republic, Mexico and Liberia will 
march upon the stage of the Municipal Auditori- 
um, each groop following the banner of the coun- 
try in which its members serve. A motion picture 
reel, made up in part of pieces of commercial 
news reels and in part from special pictures taken 
for the Convention, will be shown. Dr. Charles 
Sheerin of the National Council will act as narra- 
tor in this showing of the Church's missionary 
efforts. 

T. Z. Koo, internationally known Chinese lead- 
er, is scheduled to speak. Dr. Koo, a graduate of 
St. John's College, Shanghai, said here in 1938: 

"There is a process going on in the political life 



of the world, a struggle between democracy on 
the one hand and dictatorship on the other hand, 
which will reshape the political structures of our 
life. 

"There are large numbers of people who deny 
that God exists at all. They are militant, ag- 
gressive and vocal. 

"The Christian people, on the other hand, while 
still believing in God, are rather apologetic and 
silent about their faith. We seem to be headed 
back to the Dark Ages in Europe. The Munich 
settlement, because of its premium on force, has 
made it necessary for every nation to redouble 
its rearmament efforts." 

The mass meeting will be preceded by a Cor- 
porate Communion at 8:00 o'clock the morning of 
October 10 in the Municipal Auditorium, at which 
the Presiding Bishop will be the celebrant, assist- 
ed by the thirty-two missionary bishops of the 
Church. 

The Thank Offering of the women will be pre- 
sented by a representative of each diocese. The 
money will be in checks, enclosed in illuminated 
envelopes and laid upon the golden alms basin, 24 
inches in diameter and adorned with pictures of 
the Nativity, which was presented to the Church 
some years ago by Oxford University. 

Mrs. Henry Burr of Kansas City is chairman in 
charge of the United Thank Offering service and 
the missionary mass meeting. She is a past pres- 
ident of the Woman's Auxiliary, president of the 
Forward Movement Work in the West Missouri 
Diocese and was a member of a Flying Squadron 
following the 1934 General Convention. She is 
a member of Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral 
Parish. 



ANNUAL MEETING NORTH CAROLINA 
COUNCIL OF CHURCHES 



The annual meeting of the North Carolina 
Council of Churches will be held in the Women's 
Building, Thomasville, N. C, September 17th. 

The delegates will be the guests of the Thomas- 
ville Ministerial Association at a fellowship 
luncheon beginning at twelve-thirty o'clock. The 
clergy of this diocese are cordially invited to this 
and to remain over for the general business ses- 
sion beginning at two fifteen and lasting until 
about five o'clock. 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C, SEPTEMBER, 1940 



NUMBER 7 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



While I have little to report in this issue of 
The Mission Herald, I am glad to resume my 
monthly letter to my Diocesan family after two 
months' silence. 

With the exception of two weeks at Kanuga in 
July, when I served as Dean of the College De- 
partment of the Adult Conference, I have been at 
home all summer. I had hoped to spend most of 
the time in planning for our fall and winter ac- 
tivities and in correspondence with my co-work- 
ers throughout the Diocese, but unfortunately I 
contracted a persistent attack of Grippe early in 
August and was confined to my bed for the larger 
part of the month. Am glad to say that I am now 
on the road to recovery and while I will not be 
able to take on a very heavy schedule of services 
during September, I hope to be in my usual good 
health in a few weeks. 

During my enforced idleness I have had much 
time for thought and meditation and I can say, 
with all truth, that I have never been more con- 
scious of the need of God than I am today. We 
are facing problems in Church and State that are 
absolutely beyond our power to solve; we are 
facing a future so dangerous and uncertain that 
we stand confused and bewildered before the 
possibilities of tomorrow. We feel the shudder 
of the earthquake and the crashing thunder of 
the storm. God grant that in the midst of it 
all, we may hear the "still small voice" of God 
as He speaks to the troubled heart of men and 
nations. 

In this high, tragic hour of doubt and fear 
and human frailty, we must come back to Him. 
We must clear our lives of self in order that He 
may have His own powerful, victorious way in 
these poor, weak souls of ours. So many of us 
have become so indifferent to the claims of our 
most holy religion. We have become worldly ; 
we have wandered far from the old paths of 
loyalty, faith and courage, and if we are to save 
our Christian civilization and regain our own 
souls, we must come back to God. May I suggest 
some of the necessary steps in that journey to 
the source of all power? 

1. PRA.YER: So many of us have forgotten 
how to oray. We say our little prayers, we ask 
Cod to bless us, to keen us safe from harm, to 
protect us and our families from known and un- 
known dangers, but we must go further than 
our self-suffiency is broken and our selfish pur- 
tlu.t; v/e must wait before Him until the shell of 



poses are forgotten, and God becomes a Living 
Person who not only listens, but who speaks to 
His own dear child. "Lord speak to me that I 
may speak" must be the burden of our prayer 
today as a weary world waits for you and me 
to bring some message from God. 

2. WORSHIP: This avenue of approach to 
Him has been sadly neglected by so many of us. 
We stay away from the regular services of the 
Church; we turn our backs upon His altar; we 
complain because sermons are not interesting, or 
services uninspiring. In God's name, what are 
we doing to make our Church a source of power 
and inspiration to broken, discouraged, fearful 
people today? Surely we are not doing it by 
staying away when He calls His family to com- 
munion and fellowship with Him. 

My prayer for the Diocese is that in every 
Church and Mission our people will come together 
at every opportunity with open hearts and minds 
in humble penitence for past failures, to worship 
Cod in His Holy Temple and to carry from His 
altar the bread of their reconsecrated lives. 

3. SERVICE: It will not be enough to pray 
unless we help God to answer our prayers. Not 
enough to worshin unless that worship sends us 
so much to do in Christ's name today. Discouraged 
people to be helped and strengthened, sinful peo- 
ple to be won by the love of Christ in your life 
and mine ; indifferent people to be brought back 
to their rightful places in the fold of Christ; 
neglected places in the Diocese to be won and 
held for Christ and His Church. Kingdoms of 
hate and sin and selfishness in Diocese and 
country and world to be transformed by our 
faith and loyalty and courage into the glorious, 
victorious Kingdom of God. 

We can, my dear people, make this dreadful 
year a year of power if we are willing to let God 
through. We can make this period of seeming 
defeat a time of splendid victory, if we only have 
grace enough to follow the blood red banner of 
the Son of God. With every soul enlisted, with 
every heart aflame with the beautiful purpose 
of God, with every life reconsecrated to His 
service, East Carolina can, and please God it will 
play its full part in bringing a confused and 
disordered world back to that unity and peace 
that is to be found at the foot of the Cross. May 
God make us worthy of our high calling in this 
great hour. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 
Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



THE MISSION HERALD 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY FIELD NEWS 



News From Hankow Union School 



We wish to call to the attention of the Woman's 
Auxiliary in the Diocese of East Carolina and to 
all loyal Church members, the following letter 
from Miss Venetia Cox to Miss Patty Sherman : 

Miss Venetia Cox, 

Diocesan Union School, 

Chenna, Yunnan, China, 

April 7, 1940. 

"Dear Patty: 

"A series of illnesses have been going through 
the school recently which I thought you'd like to 
know about in making your appeal for funds for 
students. So I'm writing again. 

"Do you remember Paul Tsang of Senior 2, not 
the one of this year's graduating class? He has 
just passed away after a short illness of tuber- 
culosis. Hazel and I hardly knew he was sick 
before he was gone, and it was all so tragic. It 
seems it started in the throat about Christmas, 
then moved very quickly to his lungs and intes- 
tines. The first I knew about it he had been iso- 
lated in a room on the ground floor down in the 
second boys' dormitory and he was suffering 
acutely. Do you remember that building at all? 
It is the worst of the three, and being surrounded 
so closely by farm houses and live stock the flies 
and other insects are worse there than anywhere 
else. We've no screens, you know, and the drains 
down there are still pretty bad. So the flies prac- 
tically covered poor Paul, and upstairs lived well 
boys. 

"I investigated and found that he didn't have 
enough bedding to keep him warm, was piling on 
all the clothes he owned, and there was no money 
to buy any or nourishing food to give him. It was 
tragic. It makes my heart ache every time I 
think of it. Mrs. Yen came to the rescue with 
food, and we also helped. Then we bought new 
bedding and sheets for him, but he died the next 
week. 

"Then I began to wonder about another boy who 
was housed down there and never attending class- 
es. I asked Dr. Tsang and found he also had T. B. 
He is the son of the blind organist in Ichong, and 
was also suffering from lack of warm clothes and 
nourishing food. He is very tall and thin, and the 
few garments he had were in rags. 

"Naturally I began to wonder how many other 
cases were around us, and what could be done for 
them. So I conferred with Dr. Tsang and he said 
there are no more T. B. cases at present, but a 
number of underfed and poorly clad boys. The girls 
as a whole seem better off, especially as to clothes 



because they patch and darn, the boys don't. Our 
school food is increasingly poor, clue to the rise in 
prices, so all the students who can afford it buy 
extra things and are allowed to cook them on small 
stoves. Those who can't afford to do this are 
simply underfed. And, of course, the ones who 
need help most are least vocal and you have to 
hunt them down. 

"So I've asked Dr. Tsang to report any such 
cases to me he knows about. Well, the next day 
he sent a most tragic looking little boy from Junior 
2 to me, barefoot, very thin, and clothes very scan- 
ty and dirty and ragged. Upon questioning he 
told me no money and no letters came from home 
any more, and after asking Mr. Li he told me a 
letter had come to the school saying his parents 
had been killed by Japanese soldiers, but asked 
us not to tell the boy. 

"We've got to do something for him, but as 
you know the school has very limited funds. 

"There is also another boy from Ishang who is 
anemic, and needs special care and help financial- 
ly. And I imagine time will reveal others. 

"Among the girls we have only one chronic case, 
Hdiao Chuin Yin, but she seems to receive money 
from her family regularly. Miss Sen looks after 
their food so carefully none of them seems to be 
really suffering. But the boys don't have the 
same care, as you know, and there seems no end 
to the amount we can do for them. 

"Bishop Hall put an idea into my head last 
week, and I hope I can open a small tailor shop 
for them this summer. I can at least teach and 
help them patch and darn what they have. Some 
of them haven't had anything new since we start- 
ed our trek in 1938, and boys are hard on clothes. 

"If you can use any of these cases in making 
appeals I hope you will, and anything you can 
send along to help the needy will certainly be ap- 
preciated. 

"The class room which was down in this second 
boys' dormitory has been turned into our school 
Chapel and we've made it the most attractive one 
since we left Wuhan. Mr. Tsen had the mud bricks 
that hold up our boards for benches, whitewash- 
ed. Then we bought sacred pictures for the walls 
and a friend in Kunming has loaned us a baby 
organ. 

"My singing classes were put down there in the 
back of the room, but the flies ! Scores were 
waiting to drop in every time we opened our 
mouths to sing. Hazel said I even stopped eating 
at the table. So I took out all the mosquito net- 
ting I had left from screening our rooms, and told 
Mr. Tsen to screen the chapel. He took out the 
wooden doors and had a wooden frame made over 
which he tac>ed the netting. There was al^o 
enough for the two windows and you'd be sur- 



SEPTEMBER, 1940 



prised what a difference it makes. The room is 
lighter, and we enjoy our worship services and 
our singing. I only wish we could screen a few 
more rooms like that, especially down in that 
building I call the 'pest' house, because all the con- 
tagious cases are sent there. We had diphtheria 
there last month. Too bad they have to put up 
with our vocal noises, but perhaps it's good for 
them. 

"Bishop Hall was here on the 3rd and confirmed 
a class of eight. It was a most impressive and love- 
ly service. Dr. Y. Y. Tsu came with him. They 
had meals with us and slept in a room now term- 
ed guest room, next to Mr. James Tsen's, in boys 
dormitory No. 1. They arrived in a Red Cross 
ambulance, and went on the next morning to 
Rsichow. They were also planning canteens for 
truck drivers on this road and hope soon to have 
them opened at various places. 

"The Rev. Mark Li is still far from well, and 
we are worried that he may have to stop work 
altogether. The Rev. Benjamin Yen is still away 
and our other priest, Mr. Penn, feels his burdens 
are far too heavy. But Miss Ling has come for 
Chemistry, Mr. Pi for Chinese, and we are expect- 
ing another man for Chinese History and Math. 
So the staff is better than when you left." 

"VENETIA." 

Any interested Auxiliary or individual may send 
funds to Dr. Arthur H. Sherman, 406 Syracuse 
Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, and designate same for 
the "Hankow Union School Fund." The need is 
great. 



LETTERS FROM ST. THEODORE'S HOSPITAL, 
SAGADA, PHILIPPINES 



MANAGER OF GOOD SHEPHERD THANKS 
BRANCHES 



The Good Shepherd Hospital as objective of 
the activities of the branches of the Woman's 
Auxiliary in 1939-1940 rejoices in the kindly 
thought and provision that made possible such 
a generous supply of needed linens and other 
articles for our work. Each branch was sup- 
posed to have received an individual expression 
of thanks ; and in addition to that I wish to use 
the Mission Herald's space to thank all the branch- 
es, as well as officers of the Diocese for the very 
real and substantial help which we received. 
The gifts were not only nice in themselves, but 
were as nearly as possible the articles we asked 
for, which we had found to be most useful in 
our work. This fine expression of interest in 
the work of the Good Shepherd is most encourag- 
ing and we wish Mrs. Poisson and the officers 
and members of all the branches to know that 
we deeply appreciate their efforts in our behalf. 



The following letters are from Dr. Janet An- 
derson, Sagada Mountain Province, the Philip- 
pines, and should be of interest to all Church 
women in the Diocese of East Carolina. The item 
of $74.50 referred to in Dr. Anderson's letter of 
May 14, 1940, was the special gift voted for at the 
time of the 1939 Annual Meeting held in Wash- 
ington, N. C. 

The item of $474.50 covered the amount given 
by the Woman's Auxiliary of East Carolina in 1939 
for advance work. 

St. Theodore's Hospital, 
Sagada, Mountain Province, 
The Philippines. 
March 1, 1940. 
Mrs. John R. Tolar, 
Box 128, 
Fayetteville, N. C. 

My Dear Mrs. Tolar: 

Your letter of January 10th arrived last week. 
We certainly are grateful to the members of the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina for their check of $474.50. It is very nice to 
know that we have your group of women behind 
us in this substantial way ; apparently we have 
been cut again this year in our appropriation for 
the hospital because of the general budget's un- 
certainty, and it is very heartening to know that 
the East Carolina Auxiliary is on the job. We cut 
and clip expenses in every way possible but there 
are some things we just cannot get along without, 
as drugs, help, kerosene for our lamps, etc. Last 
year we treated 57,195 clinic patients, and had 
around 8,000 patient days in the hospital and it 
just has to have money to keep that many treat- 
ed. We are gradually educating the people to pay 
in some kind for medical attention ; they have so 
little to give that of course the proportion is way 
off. As an egg for three days in the hospital. 
Try and get an egg in these parts and one knows 
what it means to the person. Chickens get some 
disease and just are not! 

We have had about eight orphans left us in the 
last year or so. One has died but I am enclosing a 
picture of the four oldest. The youngest of that 
group was a year old in February. Our other three 
are still too small to pose for a picture. I am also 
enclosing a picture of our Auxiliary; just a year 
old in April. The members work for the hospital 
one Sunday a month, making dressings, etc., for 
us. I happen to be director of the group, so part 
of their enthusiasm goes to the hospital. 

I wish some if not all of you people could spend 
rome time in our hospital. Not as patients ! It re- 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ally is a circus when one is not too worried about 
their conditions to enjoy the side lights. It is more 
like a week-end hotel. So many of the patients 
come from some distance and cannot go back and 
forth every day, so they stay here. They cook 
their own food and are off in the nearby villages 
when they want to be in on the affairs of life here 
in Sagada. One sees our hospital gowns all over 
this area. The watchers they bring with them 
vary in number from 17 to one or two. Fortunate- 
ly, after the latter see the patient is not being 
harmed, they return home, leaving one or two as 
caretakers. When "comrades" from the same 
ili come in after an in-patient is well enough to be 
up, it is very amusing seeing the patient initiating 
the newcomer into the ropes of the hospital. 
Trouble is, what one gets is not always what the 
next one needs, and there is difficulty explaining, 
why. Alcohol rubs, extra feedings, intravenous 
medication, etc., are too expensive for all, but 
they love the attention it gives them. And if one 
patient gets well on such treatment, they all want 
it. 

We are ever so grateful to you people for your 
interest in the work here. We could not run with- 
out your money and the fact that you are work- 
ing for us shares the work here with you. 

Thank you again, 
Sincerely, 

JANET ANDERSON, M. D. 

May 14, 1940. 
My Dear Mrs. Tolar : 

Just arrived from my vacation and find a noti- 
fication slip of $74.50 given us by the East Caro- 
lina Woman's Auxiliary ! Does that come in han- 
dy ! We ordered paint for the hospital before I left 
and it has gone up in price so outrageously that 
the bill was way over our estimate of cost and it 
was looking gloomy for our funds. The National 
Auxiliary offered to pay for the paint as they 
have a fund to keep in repair buildings that are 
paid for. But between receiving their money and 
perrnision to go ahead and order, prices soared. So 
this is a wonderful landslide. It won't all have to 
go that way but the thought that it covers the 
deficit is marvelous. So we are terrifically grate- 
ful for being helped out of this hole. The paint 
looks so nice; the building is supposed to be white 
but three years of wind and rain has taken most 
of the paint off. The roof is a deep red (galvan- 
ized iron) building white and green trimmings. 

I had a wonderful vacation in China visiting 
stations permitted by the Japanese. But it was 
nice to get back here again to our little orphans 
and our hospital group. I will send you a picture 
of the hospital with its improvements as soon as 



possible. Anything takes time here; weather is 
against us at the moment and the men may be 
called away for an emergency job at any time. 
Our own employees do the work. 

I will write later more fully; just a note now to 
let you know we are very grateful to you. 
Sincerely, 

JANET ANDERSON. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY HAND BOOK 



The President of each Auxiliary in the Diocese 
has been sent one free copy of the new green Wo- 
man's Auxiliary Handbook. for the use of Parish 
branches of the Auxiliary. All Presidents are 
asked to read the introduction to this Handbook 
and try to have each departmental chairman, Uni- 
ted Thank Offering Custodian and Church Peri- 
odical Club Secretary in her group furnished with 
a copy. Additional copies are five cents apiece, 
plus postage. Postage is 4Y-> cents per copy. Your 
Chairman should be supplied with these books 
through the Treasurer of your Auxiliary. 

If by any chance you have failed to receive your 
copy notify your Diocese Field Chairman, Mrs. 
Charles F. Green, 1312 Grace Street, Wilmington, 
N. C. 



CAMP LEACH SONG 



By Belle Ray Tillinghast 

(To the tune of "South of the Border"— with 
apologies to the writer.) 

South of Little Washington, down Pamlico way; 
There on the sandy beach of dear Camp Leach, we 

work and play. 
We love to go there, we meet friends so fine, 
Down at our camp ground where life is sublime. 

South of Little Washington, down Pamlico way; 
There underneath the pines, the Bishop finds his 

chillun so gay. 
For if once you go there, you'll always go back, 
Tho' you may have to go in a broken-down hack. 

You'll smile as you hear the Bishop's poetry, 
Which may appear at any hour of the day. 
You'll enjoy his trucking and dancing, 
And you'll ne'er want to go away. 

So come to Camp Leach, down Pamlico way, 
There you can stroll on the pier, where you will 

hear, the talk of the day. 
And after you've been there your thoughts ever 

stray 
Back down to Camp Leach, down Pamlico way. 



SEPTEMBER, 1940 



THE MEN'S CLUB OF ST. JOHN'S PARISH 



The 19th meeting of the Men's Club of St. John's 
Parish was held in the Parish House at 6:15 
Thursday, June 27th, 1940. The meeting was 
opened with prayer by the Rev. E. W. Halleck, 
followed by the usual enjoyable supper. 

Following the supper, Judge John J. Burney, 
Superior Court Judge, guest speaker of the even- 
ing, was presented by President Haskett. Judge 
Burney stated that, while he had not had an op- 
portunity to prepare a speech, on any specific sub- 
ject, he would talk along the general lines of 
"What is Wrong with America Today." Judge 
Burney stated that the greater percentage of 
crimes in America today are committed by boys 
between the ages of 16 and 19, that the cost of 
the.r:e crimes to people of America each year repre- 
sents more money than the whole upkeep of our 
navy, army and air forces, and that if all boys 
upon graduating from high school were required 
to take two years of military training these crimes 
would be practically eliminated and the boys would 
be better equipped physically and otherwise to 
take care of themselves in college or in the bus- 
iness world. 

President Haskett welcomed the following 
guests: John J. Burney, J. M. Davis, H. G. Rose, 
E. Norfleet, A. T. Saint-Amand, W. B. Thorpe. 

The attendance at this meeting, including the six 
guests, numbered 37 persons, with collection for 
the supper amounting to $9.55. 

There were no reports received from the Visit- 
ing, Ushering and Ship Committees. 

Mr. Haskett announced that the new carpet 
ordered for the Church is expected to be received 
at any time and that one-half of the cost of same 
has been paid. Mr. Haskett also stated that the 
ladies of the Church will call on the members of 
the Men's Club sometime during the months of 
July and August soliciting special contributions 
towards payment of the balance due on this car- 
pet. 

Mr. Halleck and Mr. Haskett thanked Judge 
Burney for his splendid talk. As a result of Judge 
Burney's talk motion was made and seconded and 
the following resolution adopted: 

Pe It Resolved, by the members of the Men's 
Club of St. John's Parish that a letter be sent to 
the Pre- ident of the United States of America, ad- 
vcatirg two years compulsory military training 
for all boys upon graduation from high school but 
not later than their nineteenth birthday. 

Pe It Further Resolved, That a copy of this let- 
ter be sent to each of the two Senators and eleven 
Congressmen of the State of North Carolina. 



There being no further business the meeting 
was adjourned with benediction by the Rev. Mr. 
Halleck. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MONTROSE M. HINNANT, 

Acting Secretary. 



RURAL-MINDED CHURCHMEN ADOPT 
REPORT AT DUKE INSTITUTES 



A group of about thirty rural-minded church- 
men who were attending the Duke Institute came 
together at the call of Dr. J. M. Ormond to discuss 
ways in which they might work together more 
effectively in the interest of the rural church in 
North Carolina. Several denominations were rep- 
resented. After some discussion, during which a 
proposal was made to form an Interdenomination- 
al North Carolina Christian Rural Fellowship, a 
committee composed of G. R. Stafford, E. J. Ar- 
nold, W. J. B. Burrus and W C. Lyerly was ap- 
pointed to bring in a report to another meeting 
to be held on Friday. At this latter meeting the 
following report was adopted: 

"Your committee appointed by a group of rural 
church workers attending the Rural Church Insti- 
tute at Duke University in 1940, makes the fol- 
lowing recommendations : 

"1. That no action be taken now to set up a 
formal interdenominational organization of rural 
church workers. 

"2. That during the year ahead we try to think 
through to the best means for fellowship and co- 
operation among rural church workers. 

"3. That we request the services of Mr. Ernest 
J. Arnold, Executive Secretary of the North Car- 
olina Council of Churches, in furnishing and ex- 
changing information on rural church work in 
general and between members of this group. 

"4. That we request the chairman of the rural 
life committee of the North Carolina Council of 
Churches (Dr. J. M. Ormond) to call a similar 
meeting at the Convocation of Churches and dur- 
ing the Rural Church Institute in 1941. 

"5. That rural church workers in the major 
divisions of the several denominations in the 
State organize to promote the interests of the ru- 
ral church. 

"6. That all rural church workers join, as in- 
dividuals, The Christian Rural Fellowship, 156 
5th Avenue, New York, N. Y., to secure the bul- 
letins of that organization. (Membership fee, $1 
a year.)" 

Note : All correspondence regarding this move- 
ment should be addressed to Mr. E. J. Arnold at 
College Station, Durham, N. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE ROMANCE OF MISSIONS 



Bv Elwood L. Haines 



The real romance of missions is not to be found 
through the experiencing of strange adventures 
in unusual corners of the world. The real romance 
comes when a person feels that he is God's instru- 
ment for the meeting of some human need. That 
need might never be met if it were not for him. 
He is the indispensable tool with which God is 
able to do remarkable things. 

I once knew a missionary nurse to whom was 
brought a little girl who was in a pitiable state 
as the result of a skin infection. She labored pa- 
tiently and tirelessly to bring the child back to 
health. The girl was discovered one day probing 
her sores with a stick, when they were almost 
healed. She explained that she didn't want to get 
well, and leave the kindness and the care of her 
Christian friends, to go home to the fear and mis- 
ery of her native home. The way was found to 
keep her, and to rear her in a Christian atmos- 
phere to become a missionary to her people. That 
was a romance of rare vintage. 

One Christmas morning, the service in a little 
mud chapel in Africa was interruped by an old 
blind man, who came forward to ask that he be 
baptized then and there. He told of the food, the 
warm country cloth, the medicines which had 
been given him by the missionary ; of asking why 
a Christian was so concerned for him while his 
fellow-Mohammedans paid no attention to his 
needs ; and of being told that Christians did such 
things because they were followers of Jesus, who 
went about doing good. Another romance ! And 
one with a sequel ; for Dada Pepe, wearing proud- 
ly his black ebony cross on his breast and wor- 
shiping daily in that little mud chapel, witnessed 
silently to the love of Christ through the short 
remaining years of his life. 

A war dance was held in a native village one 
Christmas day, in honor of the missionaries. The 
climax seemed to come when the chief, waving 
his sword in triumph above his head, was borne 
through the village. When the procession ended, 
the chief plunged the sword into the ground at a 
missionary's feet. He, as though divinely guided, 
retrieved the sword; then he in turn was borne 
about the village. Afterwards, the chief explain- 
ed that the missionary was the chief of the tribe 
of God, that the sword of peace and love held 
sway over the sword of for e and hate. Ago.m, 
the romance of missions — the realization of what 
it means to be Cod's instrument. 



Night after night, during a trek through the 
African interior, a missionary has the experience 
of telling the Christian story to a people who live 
in almost constant terror of evil spirits. As he 
gazes into a sea of black faces uplifted to him in 
wonder, and as he hears their expressions of ap- 
proval, it dawns upon him that he is the first per- 
son that has uttered the message of divine love 
in that place. Were it not for him they would not 
know — they would continue on in darkness. Is 
it not likely, under such circumstances, that he 
should feel that he has much in common with 
Saint Paul? 

The missionary is willing to suffer for the sake 
of such romance. Many people wonder at his wil- 
lingness to endure privations. But anyone is wil- 
ling to put up with things, and to do without 
things if the cause is big enough. It was the fas- 
cination of this type of apostolic service which in- 
spired Miss Jean Kenyon McKenzie. In a charm- 
ing little book called "An African Clearing," she 
writes of the Luxury of Hardship. She tells of 
the magnitude of small satisfactions gained at 
great cost. One particular incident which illus- 
trates her feeling comes at the end of an ardu- 
ous journey, when she returns, wracked with 
fever, to her jungle home and feasts her eyes on 
"the only corner cupboard in all West Africa". 
We who serve in the Church at home have things 
much too easy. We have missed the charm of 
sacrifice and we have lost the taste for little things 
because we have not been compelled to suffer. We 
have not known the romance of realizing that we 
are indispensable instruments in God's hands. 

How can we recover this lost romance? How 
can we convey it to other people ? We cannot do 
it by putting the machinery of missions first. Dr. 
James Thayer Addison says that when the word 
"missions" is mentioned, it suggests apportion- 
ments, budgets, and passing the plate, but that 
is putting the cart before the horse. Perhaps we 
ought to stop talking of the red side of the enve- 
lope until we have done more to root the mission- 
ary enterprise in the Incarnation. Schools, hos- 
pitals and churches are established in mission 
lands bee-ause "God so loved the world". The gos- 
pel is the good news that we cannot keep. Father 
Damien, the Belgian Priest who cast his lot with 
the lepers of Molokai, obeyed an impulse that was 
irresistible. His kind of sharing puts to shame 
some of lower motives we employ in our attempt 
to justify missions. One morning he accidentally 
spilled scalding water on his foot, but felt no 
pain. That afternoon he met with his leper con- 
gregation. He electrified them when he address- 
ed them by using the term "we lepers," instead 
of "you lepers". For they knew that he had be- 



SEPTEMBER, 1940 



come one of them. From that moment his real 
ministry began. Until we learn to identify our- 
selves with the needs of men, we have not caught 
the spirit of missions. 

The Christian religion has a positive ideal. It is 
not so much a campaipn against evil as it is a 
movement toward righteousness and truth. When 
we preach Christ and Him crucified, the people will 
catch the romance of missions. Youth is ready to- 
day to give its loyalty to a Hitler or a Mussolini ; 
Nazism and Facism are youth movements based on 
a false faith. Surely youth will suffer as willing- 
ly and as keenly for a good cause as a wrong cause, 
if the good is presented to them in a challenging 
s way. Are we telling our young people that they 
are God's instruments, that His work cannot be 
done without their efforts, their prayers and their 
gifts? Have they been led to see the romance 
of missions in as striking a way as young people 
in Germany have been shown the false romance 
of the deified state? The issue today is definitely 
between Christianity and chaos. If the Church 
merits the tribute paid to it recently by Dr. Al- 
bert Einstein, we need have no fear for the fu- 
ture. Dr. Einstein has had little interest in re- 
ligion, and nothing to do with churches. But he 
was impressed, when Hitler came into power in 
Germany, by the fact that no university, no news- 
paper, no journalist stood out against the princi- 
ples of his regime. Only the Christian church 
had the courage to resist. "And today," says Dr. 
Einstein, "I can never pass any church without 
stopping and removing my hat". 

Native Christians in mission lands have felt 
the power of the Christian romance, and to such 
a degree that they put most of us to shame. They 
take their faith seriously and they are ready to 
suffer for it without a moment's hesitation or an 
instant of regret. Miss Muriel Lester, the fa- 
mous English pacifist, tells the story of the Chris- 
tian pacifists of Japan. Many of them accept 
army service, going the whole way from enlist- 
ment to embarkation to China because they do not 
want to endanger their families by resisting the 
military regime. This is due to the family loyalty 
which is a part of their religious inheritance. 
When they leave for China they make their wills 
and leave them in the hands of the oldest member 
of the family, for they do not expect to return. 
For when they arrive at the front, and are ordered 
into battle, it is then that they refuse to kill. The 
result, of course, is that they are shot in the back 
as cowards and deserters. Such is the quality of 
the Christian faith, as we find it in the mission 
field. Love is something worth dying for; fortu- 
nately they have not learned how to rationalize it 
out of existence. 



The task before us in the Church at home is 
not an easy one. Missions is in disfavor because 
it has been improperly presented. There are mis- 
apprehensions and misgivings about the whole 
enterprise, and, in addition, a spirit of nationalism 
and isolationism which has affected the very life 
of the Church. We must stir up a new loyalty 
and a firmer courage in the Church. We cannot 
do it by sentimental appeals and hard luck stories. 
The only way is by beginning at the beginning, 
and schooling our people in the great truths of 
the Fatherhood of God, the Saviorhood of Christ, 
and the power of the Holy Spirit. Missions needs 
to come back to theology before it can recover 
its lost romance. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMINGTON 



This poem was sent to Rev. Thomas L. Trott 
former Rector of Good Shepherd, Wilmington, by 
one of the young people of the Parish. 

They say a person's faith in you 

Will spur you on to win, 
Some kind of recognition 

In this changing world of men. 

If that be so, I have that friend 
In a man both Christian and true, 

A man whom God has sent to earth 
A splendid work to do. 

You are the friend I'm speaking of 

You're a fine one, Mr. Trott, 
Your friends will not forget you 

And I hope we're not forgot. 

Your faith in me has been a flame 
That burns both night and day, 

And spurs me on to greater hopes 
In life's alluring way. 

But fame is such an idle thing 

Beside a gift like yours, 
You buoy people up and chase 

The shadows from their doors. 

You give them great encouragement 
When failures make them blue, 

You give it with a willing heart 
And with God's blessing too. 

Your faithful work within our church 

Will be forgotten never, 
You've been a tower of strength to me 

I'll be your friend forever. 

THELMA MINTZ 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE INLAND WATERWAY MISSIONS 



(Prepared For the Woman's Auxiliary, Episcopal 

Diocese of East Carolina, July 1, 1940, by the 

Rev. J. Leon Malone, R. F. D. No. 3, 

Wilmington, N. C, Priest in Charge 



The Inland Waterway Missions were started by 
the late Rev. Arthur H. Marshall, Southport, N. 
C, early in 1938. Mr. Marshall made a survey of 
the communities along the southern coast of North 
Carolina in his church boat and found quite a 
number of them not being served by any church. 
He held services at a number of places but even- 
tually decided to concentrate on Calabash in Brun- 
swick county and Tar Landing in Onslow county. 

The people in these communities are of good 
stock, responsive and appreciative, but have not 
had opportunity for a great deal of advancement 
educationally, culturally and spiritually. They live 
by fishing and farming, and are definitely hand- 
icapped by distances to market, etc. We put 
their spiritual needs first in our work, and then 
try to carry out the policy of helping the people 
to help themselves. 

We have Church services in each mission on al- 
ternate Wednesdays, using the prayerbook ser- 
vices mimeographed on leaflets, simplified, yet ob- 
serving every rubric. We have a portable organ 
in each mission and at present are using the Mis- 
sion Hymnal. 

We have sponsored garden contests in both 
communities this spring, which received most fa- 
vorable comments from the farm agents and 
newspapers in both counties. We are now plan- 
ning for canning contests this summer in coop- 
eration with the Home Demonstration Agents. 

We have just completed Vacation Church 
Schools and Preaching Missions, and have been 
well pleased with the results. A number of peo- 
ple have pledged their loyalty to the Cause. 

There are small libraries in both missions and 
a fair number of books and magazines have been 
and are being circulated and read. 

The Church Boat was Mr. Marshall's personal 
property and has not been used in this work since 
his death in October, 1939. Travel to the mis- 
sions now is by automobile. 

We have clothing stations in both missions 
where clothing is sold at a somewhat lower cost 
than at the local stores. This gives our people 
clothing at prices much easier for many of them 



to pay, and causes them to have much more re- 
spect for the Church than if we gave the cloth- 
ing. It gives friends of the mission an opportu- 
nity to help by sending their good used clothing 
or clothing obtained from sewing classes, etc., and 
gives us tne much needed funds for the numer- 
ous incidental expenses. 

Calabash is near the South Carolina line. There 
are approximately 100 people living within a mile 
of the mission. St. Andrew's Church was built 
there in the spring of 1939 and Miss Elizabeth 
MacMurray of Clinton, N. C, went there to live 
and work in September, 1939. It is indeed grati- 
fying to hear the local people and others who 
knew the community before, tell of the differ- 
ence now. Miss McMurray's devotion and conse- 
cration has meant much to many individuals and 
to the community as a whole. She is a real friend 
to the people and is well qualified to be of service 
to them, bhe has led in clearing a place beneath 
some massive oaks for a park. She has made a 
fire in the church mornings at seven o'clock so 
the children could have a warm place in which to 
wait for the school bus, and has held a Morning 
Watch Service there with them. A small parish 
house is being built near the church. Mr. and Mrs. 
R. R. Stone, of Wilmington, are buying the ma- 
terial, in memory of Mr. Stone's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Stone, of the Calabash community, and 
it will be known as Stone Hall. The people in the 
community are giving some material and all the 
labor. There will be a large living room in this 
building, a bed room for the worker, a model 
though inexpensive rural kitchen. The kitchen 
will be used regularly by the worker for suppers, 
etc., and for the Home Demonstration Club work, 
through which valuable aid can be given on the 
subject of nutritions. The living room will serve 
as a club room, library, reading room, community 
center, recreation hall, Sunday School room, etc. 

A Sunday School, Young People's Service 
League, Junior League, week day Bible study 
and Sunday evening devotions are being carried 
on by Miss MacMurray. 

The services of Miss MacMurray have been of- 
fered to the Brunswick County Board of Educa- 
tion to teach a Credit Course on the Bible in the 
Shallotte High School this year. She holds a grade 
A teacher's certificate in this State and a college 
degree. We understand that she can do thh in 
two days out of each week, and we feel that it 
will be a valuable way to use her time. 

Tar Landing is a slightly more scattered com- 
munity than Calabash, yet there are a large num- 
ber of people within easy reach. Attendance at 
the servicer have easily averaged 50 to 60. The 



SEPTEMBER, 1940 



11 



services were held in a store until a few weeks 
ago, when an old dwelling house was leased and 
the people in the community had a box supper to 
raise the needed funds and did the work of remod- 
eling it for the mission work. This building is 
now known as "Marshall Hall." 

About June 1st Miss Jettie Odell of Spray, N. 
C, a member of the staff of Columbia Bible Col- 
lege, Columbia, S. C, came to Tar Landing, to 
work through the summer months. Miss Odell 
has organized a Young People's Service League 
and Sunday School. She will have a Kindergar- 
ten school on Wednesday and Saturday after- 
noons, and a Bible Study Class on Sunday even- 
ings. She is planning to cooperate with the Home 
Demonstration agent in organizing a Home Dem- 
onstration Club, and to carry on such other ac- 
tivities as may be of assistance to the communi- 
ty generally. 

Space here does not permit human interest 
stories, incidents and details that we could give. 
This outline of plans and programs, however, does 
give a general idea of what is actually being ac- 
complished in two communities along the coast, 
and what the Church can do in other rural com- 
munities in the Diocese when we are ready to set 
our hands to the task. "I came that ye might 
have life and have it more abundantly." "The 
field is white unto harvests." "Pray ye therefore 
the Lord of the harvests." 

Some Needs 

Cash, clothing, choir vestments — for both 
adults and children, books, especially books on the 
Church and devotional reading. Station wagon 
or contributions toward the purchase and opera- 
tion of one. This will enable Miss MacMurray to 
serve a much larger territory in communities 
where there is need and where she has been in- 
vited to go. 



PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH GAINS 

COMMUNICANTS GREATER THAN U. S. 

GAINS POPULATION 



By Alexander B. Andrews 

The Episcopal Church during the 10 years end- 
ing 1936 gained 195,473 communicant members, a 
gain of 16.65 per cent, while during the same 
ten-year period the United States population in- 
creased from 116,531,963 to a census estimated 
population of 128,429,000, which is an increase of 
10.2 per cent, or in other words gained communi- 



cant members one and a half times the popula- 
tion gain, so stated Alexander B. Andrews, an 
attorney of Raleigh, N. C, who is Chancellor of 
the Diocese of North Carolina, and one of the rec- 
ognized students of Episcopal Church statistics. 

He further called attention to Bulletin No. 19 
of the United States Census of Religious Bodies 
for 1936, relating to the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, which computed on a baptized member- 
ship shows a decrease of baptized membership of 
123,751, the number of baptized Episcopalians 
now standing at 1,735,335. The census notes that 
the baptized membership under thirteen years 
was 20 per cent in 1936, when the birth rate the 
preceding ten years had averaged 18 per cent, and 
the 1926 census showed the baptized membership 
under thirteen at 26 per cent, when the average 
birth rate for the ten years preceding 1925 was 
22.8 per cent. This accounts for the decrease in 
the number of baptized persons under thirteen 
years of age of 149,065 baptized persons, which 
unconsciously and unintentionally leads one into 
questioning whether the Church has gained in 
communicant membership. 

Mr. Andrews criticized very strongly the ar- 
ticle on page 16, "Census of Religious Bodies 
Shows Loss of 6.7 per cent in Membership of 
Protestant Episcopal Church in Ten Years," which 
appeared in The Churchman, dated June 16, 
1940, a semi-monthly Episcopal Church Magazine 
published in New York City, stating that the ar- 
ticle was misleading in the extreme and not borne 
out by the compiled records of the Episcopal 
Church, showing the number of communicants in 
each year of the decade. 

For the ten years ending January 1, 1940, (sta- 
tistics not yet compiled) will show an approximate 
membership in Continental United States of 
1,447,043 communicants, which is an increase of 
192,816 communicants or 15.4 per cent, while es- 
timated United States population increased to 
191,912,488, an increase of 9,137,442 is only am 
increase of 7.4 per cent. In other words the Epis- 
copal Church for the past ten years has grown 
twice as fast as the population. 

There were other numerous interesting matters 
arising out of the changed population and age 
group distribution, which he stated would require 
too detailed an explanation, but would show that 
the Church was reaching the people in the pres- 
ent day equally as much as in past years. 

He highly commended Census Bulletin No. 19 
to all students of Church statistics, bearing in 
mind the distinction between the Government 
count of baptized persons and the Church count 
of confirmed communicants. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MEETINGS IN SEPTEMBER 



September 2nd to 6th, Camp Leach, Conference 
planned by the Young People's Service League 
of the Diocese for leadership training. 

September 4th, Camp Leach, Special meeting 
of the Department of Christian Social Relations, 
the Rev. Mortimer Glover, Chairman. 

September 24th, Meetings of the departments 
of the Executive Council. 

September 25th, Meeting of the Executive 
Council of the Diocese. 



THE FALL PROGRAM 



The Rev. Alexander Miller, Chairman of the 
Promotional Department has announced that the 
Fall Program of his department will be ready 
for consideration by the Executive Council at its 
September meeting, and that the Program will 
be furnished each parish and mission as soon as 
possible after the meeting. Pledge cards to be 
used in the Annual Every Member Canvass will 
be mailed along with the program. The depart- 
ment has to wait until the meeting of the Execu- 
tivetive Council to send out the Program, but 
the parishes and missions do not have to wait 
until that time to begin their preparation for the 
Every Member Canvass. The parishes should be 
properly organized for the Canvass and be ready 
to begin some intensive work when the Program 
is received. There are many things in the way of 
teaching and organization that can be done now, 
and should be done at the earliest possible date. 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICE LEAGUE PAGE 



At the Annual Convention of the Young People's 
Service League at Camp Leach, it was decided to 
publish the Service League in the Mission Herald 
again this year, and Miss Mary D. Home of 
Greenville was again elected Publicity Chairman. 
Beginning with the October issue, Miss Home 
will report the news each month and will write 
the Service League editorials. She did a good 
job last year, and we know that she will continue 
to make the Service League Pages the most in- 
teresting in the paper. It is our hope that each 
family where there is a member of the Service 
League will help us to continue this service by 
subscribing to the paper at our regular subscrip- 
tion price of $1.00 a year. Last year, we fur- 
nished the paper without cost to a large number 
of league members in the hope that they would 
become interested and want to take the paper, 
and we are confident that we shall hear from 
many of them within the next few weeks. 



DELEGATES ELECTED BY THE WOMAN'S 
AUXILIARY TO THE TRIENNIAL MEET- 
ING TO BE HELD IN KANSAS CITY 
THIS FALL 



Delegates: Mrs. Louis J. Poisson, Wilmington, 
N, C; Mrs. W. 0. S. Sutherland, Wilmington, 
N. C. ; Mrs. Harry G. Walker, Washington, N. C. ; 
Mrs. Donald MacRae, Wilmington, N. C. ; Mrs. 
Charles F. Green, Wilmington, N. C. 

Alternates : Mrs. F. F. Fagan, New Bern, N. C. ; 
Mrs. John W. Hardy, Williamston, N. C. ; Miss 
Hennie Long, Greenville, N. C; Mrs. John R. 
Tolar, Fayetteville, N. C. ; Mrs. Sam Fowle, Wash- 
ington, N. C. 

The Woman's Auxiliary of the Convocation 
of Colored Church Workers will be represented 
at the Triennial Meeting by its President, Mrs. 
R. I. Johnson and others to be selected by her. 
The Rev. R. I. Johnson will be in Kansas City at 
the time of the Convention in the interest of the 
Good Shepherd Hospital. 

We have heard of a number of people who will 
attend the meeting as visitors and it seems that 
the Diocese of East Carolina will be well repre- 
sented. 



DEPUTIES AND ALTERNATE DEPUTIES 
TO THE GENERAL CONVENTION 



At the meeting of the Annual Convention, held 
in January of this year, deputies and alternate 
deputies to the General Convention, which will 
meet in Kansas City, Mo., October 9th to 24th, 
1940, were elected as follows: 

Clerical Deputies: Rev. Mortimer Glover, Rev. 
Alexander Miller, Rev. John C. Grainger, Rev. 
W. R. Noe. 

Alternate Clerical Deputies: Rev. Stephen 
Gardner, Rev. E. F. Moseley, Rev. W. Tate Young, 
Rev. George F. Hill. 

Lay Deputies: Mr. George B. Elliott, Mr. W. 
G. Gaither, Mr. Guy C. Harding, Mr. J. Q. Beck- 
with. 

Alternate Lay Deputies: Mr. C. R. Wheatly, 
Mr. D. M. Warren, Mr. J. A. Moore, Mr. R. S. 
Plummer. 



THE UNITED THANK OFFERING 



The United Thank Offering of the Women of 
the Church will be presented throughout the Dio- 
cese on Sunday, September 8th, or as near that 
date as possible. This will be the last offering 
before the Triennial Meeting in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri in October. 



SEPTEMBER, 1940 



13 




Class at St. Thomas' Mission, Sladesville, N. C. Confirmed 

by Bishop Darst on April 15, 1940. This Mission is now 

Served by Rev. Charles M. Johnson, who was Recently 

Ordained by Bishop Darst to the Diaconate. 



MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY OF 
THE COLORED CONVOCATION 



The Summer Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary 
of the Colored Convocation was held in conjunc-- 
tion with the Convocation in St. Mark's Church,. 
Wilmington. Mrs. R. I. Johnson, president, pre- 
sided. Most of the parishes and missions sent 
delegates whose reports showed much activity 
in the branches. Mrs. Louis J. Poisson was pres- 
ent and delivered an inspiring and helpful address. 
A corporate celebration of the Holy Communion 
was held with the Rev. J. B. Brown as celebrant, 
assisted by Rev. C. M. Johnson, at which time the 
United Thank Offering was presented. The re- 
port of Mrs. R. R. Taylor, United Thank Offering 
Custodian, showed that the offering at this Tri- 
ennial will exceed any past offering by at least 
$100. Donations were made for the annual ex- 
pense fund, the Farmville Mission, and Good 
Shepherd Hospital. St. Mark's branch, Mrs. Lat- 
ta, president, presented an interesting United 
Thank Offering Pageant as the closing feature of 
the meeting. Reports were heard from the Box 
Work and Educational Secretaries. 



ADDRESS OF MRS. R. I. JOHNSON OF NEW 
BERN, PRESIDENT OF WOMAN'S AUX- 
ILIARY OF THE CONVOCATION OF 
COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Officers and members of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Colored Convocation: 

We gather today in St. Mark's Church, Wil- 
mington, where in past years we have had many 
happy, fruitful meetings, amid beautiful sur- 
roundings that bespeak the churchly tradition of 
one of our oldest and strongest parishes; among 
people who through three generations have held 
high the standard of our faith and worship. To 
the rector and members, especially the many fine 



women of St. Mark's we bring greetings and ex- 
press our gratitude for the generous hospitality 
which, now as always, makes our stay here one to 
be remembered and cherished among the pleasant 
and inspiring recollections of a lifetime. 

It is with gratitude that we note the size 
and character of the delegation which has come 
to this meeting, which seems to betoken untapped 
reservoirs of power in the service of our Lord and 
His Church by many devoted women in our par- 
ishes and missions. May we discover at this meet- 
ing some helpful and practicable ways of har- 
nessing the power of our women to the tasks that 
confront us today and the opportunity to serve 
which waits for us all. 

It is a serious time ; things are coming to pass 
that none of us ever expected to see and swift 
changes seem to tell us that a world is passing 
which we shall never see again. As often in the 
history of the world forces of godlessness and ruth- 
lessnessare abroad and for the time, at least, they 
who have loved peace, order, freedom and human- 
ity are at a disadvantage. Only God knows what 
the issue will be. In such an hour it is our faith 
alone that sustains us. We know that whatever 
betide, He watches over all, and in His own time 
and in His own way will bring to pass that which 
pleases Him most. 

Beneath the shadow of Thy wings 
Thy saints have dwelt secure; 

Sufficient is Thine arm alone 
And Thy defense is sure. 

If women everywhere must take account of the 
sorrows of a stricken world today, it can never 
be a cold, calculating thing, for more than all else 
their hearts are wounded as fathers, husbands and 
sons march out to the slaughter of the flowers 
of the world's manhood. How long have women 
prayed to be spared the horrors and the heart- 
aches of all this. 

To contemplate the misery of the world is to 
be awakened anew to the meaning of all that our 
missionary society calls on us to do and be. 

1. In a dark hour when men's hearts are fail- 
ing them for fear and strange questions are 
abroad about the power and goodness of God we 
must bear witness to the living faith that in every 
age of distress has kept a light of hope burning 
on the altars of the race. "He that endureth 
unto the end shall be saved" and in the strength 
of that conviction men have groped their way 
through the darkness until they have rediscov- 
ered and recovered their God. We know that 
v/here the winter's blasts have swept bare the 
limbs of the trees and seered the beauty of the 
world, green grass has grown again and tender 
verdure has reclothed the gaunt limbs of the for- 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



est. So has it been with the generations who 
have trusted in the Living God. Where the blasts 
of human passion, greed and brutality have 
blighted the beauty, order and liberty of men, 
the strong arm of the Almighty has been stretch- 
ed out to restore and heal. How urgent today are 
our intercessions that our penitence for our 
wrongs and our resolutions to follow closely may 
be a reality which God in His mercy will accept. 
If our generation is to be led back to God, the 
women in our homes and churches must lead the 
way. May the leaders and members of our 
branches in every church accept their responsi- 
bility. May many women old and young experi- 
ence that recoil from the sordidness and vanity 
of worldliness that will compel them to seek ces- 
sation of anxiety and fullness of courageous 
faith that will see the triumph from afar and 
patiently bring it nigh. 

Not only in our life of prayer, intercession and 
consecration must we be valiant, but likewise in 
labor and sacrifice. 

When we look around at our poorly attended 
services; when we observe our so inadequately 
supported programs ; and the meager results that 
follow anxious efforts, must we not realize that 
God and His Kingdom are not filling a very large 
place in the hearts of many who call themselves 
Christians? To every woman who has seen the 
vision glorious here is an immediate task. With 
eternal persistence we must awaken our sisters in 
Christ to the meaning of their position and some- 
how enlist them in loving labor. Not only must 
these be awakened, but untold thousands must 
be claimed who have never named the Name of 
Jesus. In times like this many people do turn to 
God. Reports from China tell us that in these 
distressing years recently when men thought 
that the Church would lose ground, the growth in 
membership has been surprisingly larger than 
ever before. Let us go out and labor with wom- 
en. And to our labor let us add the sacrifices of 
time and money so needed to strengthen the arms 
of those who will go out to posts of danger and 
offer themselves for Christ's sake. In our par- 
ishes, our communities, our dioceses, the nation 
and the world let us pray, labor and give to make 
Christ known for He only can save in this hour. 

The Triennial at Kansas City, October 9th-24th, 
will meet in an atmosphere we have not known 
before and on the heart of every one the plight 
of the world will rest with crushing weight. Pray- 
ers will be offered and glorious gifts of money and 
service will be offered to the Lord. Humble though 
our little part may be, it must represent, it must 
carry with it an expression of our understand- 
ing, our sympathy, and our full resolution to 
"ount for srmething in the great process by which 



God heals the wounds of the world by the light of 
His truth and power. 

Returning from the Triennial we must resolve 
in each parish and mission to carry out the full 
program of the W. A. In preparation for the Tri- 
ennial meeting women have been asked to pray 
in the words of the beautiful prayer for the Tri- 
ennial. In addition we are asked to study the fol- 
lowing questions: 

To what extent are the women in our parishes 
working together in a program representing ev- 
ery phase of the Church's life in all fields of its 
activity ? Last year I dwelt at length on the cul- 
tural value of this program. 

How far is the work of the Auxiliary centered 
in worship and in the development of the relig- 
ious life of the women? 

How may we develop a sense of individual re- 
sponsibility for the support of the Church's pro- 
gram? I also pointed out that it means to study 
the study courses of the educational department 
and do something definite in raising the quota as 
well as give liberally to the United Thank Offer- 
ing. Our educational secretary complains of little 
response. Some way must be found to make our 
women see that they will always do little if they 
don't take time to study and learn what this thing 
is all about. I sincerely hope that Mrs. Taylor's 
report on the United Thank Offering will show a 
more understanding response. I hope also that 
every branch met its box work quota, for this is 
a living contact with workers in the field and cre- 
ates a sense of unity and fellowship. 

Again we are asked to study, What effort are 
we making to emphasize the fact that a truly 
Christian home is not only "a haven of peace 
and security" but a working fellowship with a 
growing sense of responsibility towards the local 
and world community ? And, how may the women 
of the Church become a force for the building of 
a World Christian Community? 

These are searching and timely questions and 
I hope that you have all been giving them serious 
thought and taking them into earnest prayer. 

When I think about our work I realize that 
unless we can get every branch to work on the 
whole program and make regular reports we can 
never experience the sense of achievement that 
we should. I have never been able to make a com- 
plete report simply because branches do not fur- 
nish me with the proper information. Mrs. Wil- 
son, for instance, says that she doesn't know 
whether all branches fill their box work quota 
or not because they have not complied with her 
request to send a card saying that they have done 
so. 

A study of the minutes and program of the 
Diocesan Branch would prove to be enlightening 



SEPTEMBER, 1940 



15 



and although we cannot carry out all that they 
do, yet there is much that we can, and I don't know 
of anything better than to adopt that program 
and adapt it to the capacity of our branches. 

I record today again my deep appreciation for 
all the encouragement from the Diocesan Presi- 
dent and white branches. This year they have 
sent wonderful supplies to the Good Shepherd 
Hospital which should be dear to the hearts of all 
of us as East Carolina's effort to help our people 
in a way that they need most. I hope that colored 
branches will find through the years an increas- 
ing sense of responsibility for this great institu- 
tion in our midst. 

If you have responded to Mrs. Taylor's re- 
quest in the way she asked, we shall have enough 
money for the United Thank Offering this year 
to surpass anything that we have done thus far. 
A nd if all branches bring their quotas for support 
of the Convocation, we shall be able to give some 



needed help to worthy efforts in the Convocation. 
Last year we donated to St. Timothy's, Farmville, 
the Good Shepherd Hospital, and the lot for the 
new mission in Hyde County, which had been 
bought and now awaits only united efforts to help 
in building a church. I hope that we may be 
able to help these objects again. 

Let us get a real program here and let us go 
home and carry it out. So much waits, so much 
depends on how we hold up the Cross in our little 
corners. Our work is tremendously worthwhile. 
The only way we can do it at all well is to do our 
best. Ask God to show us the way, and give us 
the strength to go bravely to work and go reso- 
lutely on. There is every reason to believe that 
as a result of the consecrated labors of our women 
the life of the Church may be greatly enriched 
in East Carolina. New souls may be garnered, 
new energies released, new helpers enlisted, if we 
will only make up our minds that it must be so! 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 

GENERAL CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1. 1940 TO DECEMBER 31, 1940 

CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



Paid lo 
September 1 
1940 
Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $ 165.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 75.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 963. *?8 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 580.74 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 64.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 450.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 33.57 

New Bern, Christ Church 1,117.79 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 25.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' . 

Southport, St. Philip's 121.65 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 21.40 

Whiteville, Grace Church 30.07 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd .• 222.56 

Wilmington, St. James' 6,130.25 

Wilmington, St. John's 1,546.32 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 445.00 



Organized Missions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Campbelllon. St. Philip-Apostle 

Faison. St, Gabriel's 

North West, All Soui's 

Pikeville, St. George's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 



Unorganized Missions 

Calabash, St. Andrew's 

Polloksville, Mission 

Tar Landing, Mission 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd ... 



Paid to 
September 1 
1940 



4.20 
20.00 
17.50 

5.00 

16.10 
10.00 



12.55 



2.73 
55.00 



Total $12,134.71 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holv Cross 27.31 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 7.85 

Belhaven, St. James' 58.63 

Bonnerton, St. John's 13.50 

Chocowinity. Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 31.25 

Creswell, St. David's 25.02 

Edenton, St. Paul's 700.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 706.03 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Marv's 37.81 

Greenville, St. Paul's 619.76 

Grifton, St. John's 3.61 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 250.00 

Jessama, Zion 106.72 

Lake Landing, St. Geo - ge's 15. 4f 

Plymouth, Grace Chu-ch 150.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 2S !3 

Washington, St. Peter's 1,310.40 

Williamston, Advent 150.50 



Windsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro. St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary — 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's ... 



Unorganized Missions 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 



20.00 

17.79 

112.50 



22.98 



54.45 
31.00 



10.00 

125.00 

40.00 



17.00 



Parochial Missions 

Creswell, Galilee Mission 



Total $ 4,690.05 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cvprian's... 
Wilmington, St. Mark's ... 



Organized Missions 

Belhaven. St. Mary's 

Edenton, St. John the Evangelist 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Washington, St. Paul's 



13.83 
131.00 
102.00 



16.02 
65.00 
16.03 
15.00 
9.89 
20.00 



Unorgtnized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Farmville, St. Timothy's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X-Rcads, St. Stephen's 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, Brooklyn Mission 



5.22 
14.50 



5.0G 



19.00 
9.50 



Total 



441.99 



Grand Total $17,266.75 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



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Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: j 

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RECTOR 



THEY ARE ON SALE IN YOUR PARISH 

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Price 35 cenis 



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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 

of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 

Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 

Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 

Wilmington, N. C. 



INVESTMENTS ! 



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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

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A lour year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
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A College Preparatory Department, Training School fur Nurses 
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the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
Wilmington, N. C. 



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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter 
continue her education in a Church school. 

MRS ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, A. M. 
President 

Saint M<ry's offers the loth, 11th, and 12lh grades 

of High S 'hool and 2 years College work. All aoadn- j 

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Tennis, 20 acre campus and Indoor Tiled Pool. I 

Catalogue and Book- of Views ! 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 

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Hp^^ 



OCT 1 2 1940 



Jan 41 

Library, U. N. C, 



VOLUME LIV 



OCTOBER, 1940 



E 



^0ft f \fdur Church is 

kur friend 




Your Parish Needs Him and )bu 



U.N. : "i^ 



CAROLINA 



ROOM 



NUMBEH 8 




THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



Published Monthly except July and August at 
507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH C AROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

~~ EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Editor 

REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 

Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 



PROGRAM OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
EVANGELISM WILL BE READY SOON 



The Department of Evangelism is preparing to 
present a program for 1940-41 that will require 
of the Church the exercise of the power of God 
in its witness to the present age. World condi- 
tions cry aloud of the need of repentance of man 
and a return to God. It is of this need of man 
for God that the program will endeavor to meet. 
Man cannot longer live without God. He has tried 
it and failed. Only an aggressive evangelism of 
a God empowered Church can arrest the mind of 
man and call him back to God. This will be the 
emphasis throughout the ensuing year. The pro- 
gram will appear in the November issue of Tha 
Mission Herald. 

J. R. R. 



CLERGY CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD IN 
NOVEMBER 



The first of the Clergy Conferences for the 
year will be held on Monday, November the 4th, 
in St. Mary's Church, Kinston. All member." of 
the Clergy are urged to arrange to attend on that 
date. A new program will be presented, based 
upon an effort to discover what the Religious Mes- 
sage of the New Testament really is. 

J. R. R. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY ARE TO STUDY 

"WITNESSES TO THE POWER OF GOD" 

THE THEME OF THE TRIENNIAL 



The Woman's Auxiliary is to make a study of 
the great subject, "Witnesses to the Power of 
God", the theme of the Triennial this year. In 
their excellent program, just off the press, they 
give some valuable suggestions for study. The 
editor recommends a careful study of the Book of 
Romans during this period, and the use of a good 
commentary in the study. We especially recom- 
mend C. H. Dodd, "The Epistle of Paul to the Ro- 
mans", in the Moffatt series of New Testament 
commentaries. It should be found in every cler- 
gyman's library. We should also like to commend 
a study of Day's book, "The Faith We Live", as 
just about the best thing we know in presentation 
of methods for obtaining a spiritual renewal and 
power. In this issue of The Mission Herald, there 
is the first of three articles, which the associate 
editor will write on the theme. It is a humble ex- 
pression of personal experience, rather than an 
effort to expound a theory. 

J. R. R. 



THE DIOCESAN DEBT 



Since the meeting of the Annual Convention in 
January more than six thousand dollars have 
been paid on the debt by the parishes and mis- 
sions. The debt at the time of the Convention 
was $19,000.00. It is now about $12,600.00. 

The Finance Department has had the assist- 
ance of laymen in the several districts, who have 
shown much interest in completing the payments 
on the debt during this year. At a recent meet- 
ing of the Finance Department it was decided to 
continue this effort in the hope that through pay- 
ments by parishes and missions that have not 
yet completed their work the balance due on the 
debt will be paid by the end of this year. 

Early in September Mr. Guy C. Harding of 
Washington, made an appeal by letter to the lay- 
men of the districts to complete this work as soon 
as possible, with the result that a number of par- 
ishes have made substantial payments. At a meet- 
ing of the Executive Council, held in Kinston, on 
September the 25th, the Chairman of the De- 
partment of Finance was requested to write Mr. 
Harding to thank him for his fine spirit of co- 
operation. 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C, OCTOBER, 1940 



NUMBER 8 



BISHOP'S LETTER 






While my activities during September have been 
somewhat limited I have a few very interesting 
incidents and engagements to report to our dioce- 
san family. 

On Tuesday morning, the third, in St. Paul's 
Church, Greenville, I ordained Edward Benjamin 
Ferguson to the Diaconate and celebrated Holy 
Communion. The timely and helpful ordination 
sermon was preached by the Reverend Stephen 
Gardner and the candidate was presented by the 
Rev. Worth Wicker. We welcome the Rev. Mr. 
Ferguson into the ranks of our clergy and wish 
him Godspeed as he enters upon the interesting 
and hopeful work of St. Paul's, Clinton, St. Ga- 
briel's, Faison and Grace Church, Whiteville. 

Owing to the fact that I had not at that time 
sufficiently recovered from my recent illness, I 
was unable to attend the conference of leaders of 
young people at Camp Leach the first week in 
September, but I followed the conference with 
prayerful interest and rejoiced to learn of its 
splendid success. 

In connection with the wonderful influence of 
Camp Leach on the lives of our young people, it 
is interesting to note that at the present time, 
five of our former campers are preparing for the 
ministry of the Church. 

Those who witnessed the confirmation of Har- 
vey Glazier in the outdoor chapel during the sen- 
ior camp last summer, will be happy to learn that 
he is now a student at the Virginia Theological 
Seminary. Other former campers at this same 
Seminary are Billy Daniels and John Bonner. 

On Thursday, the nineteenth, I assisted in a 
funeral service in St. James' Church, Wilmington, 
at 5:00 P.M. 

On Saturday evening, the twenty-first, I offi- 
ciated at a wedding in the First Presbyterian 
Church. Columbus, Georgia. The occasion was 
an especially happy one for me as I had baptized 
the bride in her infancy and confirmed her some 
twelve years later. 

On Wednesday, the twenty-fifth, I presided at 
a hopeful and helpful meeting of the Diocesan 
Executive Council in Kinston. 

On Thursday night, the twenty-sixth, I attend- 
ed a supper meeting of St. John's Men's Club of 
Wilmington. 

On Saturday night, the twenty-eighth, I offici- 
ated at a wedding in the First Presbyterian 
Church, Wilmington. 

On Sunday, the twenty-ninth, at 11 :00 A. M. 



I preached and confirmed two persons presented 
by the Rev. Howard Alligood in Christ Church, 
Hope Mills. 

In the afternoon, at three-thirty, I preached 
and confirmed one person presented by Mr. Alli- 
good in St. Stephen's Church, Red Springs. 

In the evening at 7:30 I preached and confirm- 
ed two persons presented by Mr. Alligood and three 
persons presented by the Rev. W. Tate Young (for 
St. John's, Fayetteville) in the Church of the 
Good Shepherd, Tolar Hart Village, Fayetteville. 

On Sunday, October 6th, I expect to leave for 
Kansas City, Mo. where I will be in attendance up- 
on the General Convention until about the twenty- 
fourth. 

East Carolina will have a full delegation of 
clerical deputies, but, unfortunately, not more 
than one of our four lay deputies will be able to 
attend. We are happy to report that we will have 
a two hundred percent attendance of our women 
at the Triennial meeting of the Woman's Auxili- 
ary as not only the five delegates, but the five al- 
ternates are planning to be present. 

Matters of great importance will be discussed 
at General Convention and I earnestly ask the 
prayers of our people both in their private devo- 
tions and in the public services of the Church, that 
those of us who go may allow the Holy Spirit to 
guide and strengthen us as we take counsel 
together concerning the Kingdom of God. I quote 
from a recent article in the Southern Churchman : 

"Presiding Bishop Tucker is expected to urge 
that in a time such as the present there is urgent 
need for missionary extension and for a general 
strengthening of the Church at home, so that it 
may be able to serve its destined purpose in help- 
ing rebuild the world, when peace comes both in 
Europe and in the Far East." 

Bishop Tucker will also ask for a long time pro- 
gram of advance along all lines of helpful activity 
and surely East Carolina will want to share in 
that advance and play its full helpful part in the 
redemption of the poor, war-crazed and sin-stain- 
ed world. We can help a little bit by our generous 
giving to His cause when the opportunity is offer- 
ed us in the Every Member Canvass this fall, but 
our efforts will be of little avail until we give our- 
selves more completely to God and His way of life. 

Some of us have wandered far from the old 
paths and lost the beauty of our faith because of 
our worldliness and our sin. God is calling us 
back to his altars; the blessed Jesus is calling us 
to His service; a broken world is asking us to 
make it whole. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Sons and daughters of God, we must hear and 
heed. The situation was never more critical, the 
danger never more real. We simply cannot fail 
God and humanity at such a time as this ! 
Faithfully and affectionately, 
Your friend and Bishop, 
THOMAS C. DARST. 



SPECIAL NOTICE TO THE MEMBERS OF THE 
WOMAN'S AUXILARY OF THE DIOCESE 



THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



October Calendar 

General Convention and Triennial Meet- 
ing held in Kansas City, Mo 9-25 

St. Luke - - 18 

St. Simon and St. Jude 28 

The Great Thanksgiving Service will be held 
October 10th, Kansas City. It is suggested that 
every parish unite in this Thanksgiving Service 
by the celebration of the Holy Communion at 8:00 
A. M., or a service of Intercession and Thanks- 
giving. In this way every woman in the Church 
will feel that she has had a part in the presenta- 
tion of the United Thank Offering of the past 
three years. 

When our delegates return from the Triennial 
at Kansas City they will have plans and a goal for 
the next Triennium. The many women who do 
not go can be prepared in mind and spirit to exe- 
cute the plans by keeping in touch with the Con- 
vention. The Living Church covers every phase 
of the Convention. Send one dollar to 744 North 
Fourth Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for the is- 
sues preceding and during the Convention. "Pray- 
er for the General Convention should rise now, 
unceasingly, from the heart of every woman in 
the Church, and its proceedings should be follow- 
ed with intelligent interest." 

To all Parish Publicity Chairmen: Let us be- 
gin in earnest our survey of church members, find- 
ing out who wants to renew their subscriptions 
to The Mission Herald, Forth or any other Church 
paper. There are many would-be subscribers. 
Have you solicited them? 



HOLY INNOCENTS, SEVEN SPRINGS 



On Saturday afternoon, August the 17th, the 
Auxiliary met at the County Home. This is an 
annual visit the inmates and the Auxiliary look 
forward to. 

A devotional program was given, the inmates 
taking part. After the benediction, refreshments 
furnished by the Auxiliary were served. 

A collection of magazines was contributed to 
the home. 

MRS. KLEBER CROOM, 

Publicity Chairman. 



The address of the Woman's Auxiliary delegates 
to the Triennial is: Care of the Commonwealth 
Hotel, Kansas City, Mo. 

Your delegates want you to know that they 
have all Diocesan Parish Branches of the Auxili- 
ary constantly in their thoughts and prayers. 
They represent you in this great gathering of the 
women of the Church, and feel not only the priv- 
ilege but the responsibility entrusted to them. 
Write them for any desired information. Their 
wish is to serve you. 



REPORT OF UNITED THANK OFFERING 
' CUSTODIAN 



Mrs. Frank F. Fagan, United Thank Offering- 
custodian for the Diocese of East Carolina, re- 
ports that the amount of the ohering to October 
1st is $10,578.78 She is very much gratified 
that the goal of $10,000.00 for the Triennium has 
been passed. 

The offering will be presented at the Triennial 
meeting at the corporate communion service, Oc- 
tober iOth at 8:00 A. M. Kansas city time. (About 
9:00 A. M. our time.) 

Mrs. Fagan hopes that a similar service will 
be held in each parish and mission in this diocese 
at as near this hour as possible, or that the women 
meet together and hold a short prayer service at 
this hour. She asks for the prayers of all the 
women of the diocese as she joyfully presents the 
offering of prayer and gifts and joyful service. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY FIELD NOTES 



In the September issue of The Mission Herald 
a letter from Miss Venetia Cox to Miss Patty 
Sherman was published. This letter told of the 
great need for funds in the operation of the Han- 
kow Union School. Some contributions have al- 
ready been sent in. 

Word has just been received that Miss Sher- 
man, who has been on furlough in this country 
for the past several months, is sailing November 
2nd, for Chennan Yunan, China. 

If further help from the women of East Caro- 
lina is being contemplated would it not be fitting 
to have our gifts go with Miss Sherman to Miss 
Cox? 

The address is Dr. Arthur H. Sherman, 406 
Sycamore street, Cincinnatti, Ohio. 

Mark gift "for Hankow Union School Fund." 



OCTOBER, 1940 



ADVANCE IS AUTUMN PROGRAM KEYNOTE 



Bishop Tucker Calls Parishes to Undertake Care- 
fully Planned Every Member Canvass — 
Early Reports Encouraging 



Advance is the keynote which the Presiding 
Bishop has sounded for the Fall Program and 
Every Member Canvass. It is expected to be the 
keynote of his opening sermon to General Con- 
vention meeting in Kansas City this month. 

The Presiding Bishop feels that the European 
War and world conditions as a whole make an 
aggressive offensive on the part of the Church 
against anti-Christian tendencies imperative at 
this time. And it is for this reason that he 
calls upon every parish in the Church to prosecute 
a carefully planned and executed Every Member 
Canvass. 

The situation with regard to missionary work 
sponsored by European countries now engaged 
in or affected by the European war, especially 
the work of the Church of England, has given 
Bishop Tucker a good deal of concern in recent 
weeks and it is likely that he will present this 
matter to General Convention for consideration. 
Requests for help already have come to him from 
English Missionary Societies. He believes this 
is one of the great challenges of the present mo- 
ment to the Church in the United States. 

Reports reaching the Presiding Bishop indi- 
cate a more careful preparation for the Canvass 
this fall than in many years. Some seventy Dio- 
cesan Clergy and Lay Conferences have been ar- 
ranged, at which Canvass methods will be studied, 
the Diocesan and General Church Programs pre- 
sented, and ways and means of improving the 
parish program considered. 

A wide variety of Canvass materials has been 
prepared under the Presiding Bishop's direction 
by the National Council. These materials (ex- 
cept for charge items) will be sampled to all the 
parish clergy in September. The materials are 
keyed to these war days and are designed es- 
pecially from the parish point of view. 

Prepare Now 

Preparation for the Canvass ought to begin 
this month and the intensive build-up should pro- 
ceed through October, while General Convention 
is in progress. 

The Presiding Bishop will give his broadcast 
to the whole Church over the Columbia network 
November 10, at 10 A. M., Eastern Standard 
Time, from New York. Parishes are urged to 
make special plans for hearing his message. Can- 
vass groups especially should meet together to 
listen in. 



Canvass Dates November 10-24 

The Canvass dates as decreed by the Presiding 
Bishop are November 10-24. Bishop Tucker has 
asked that parishes report as soon after November 
24 as possible to their respective Bishops and 
Diocesan Departments. 

In a real sense, the Canvass this year is the 
opening feature of the Presiding Bishop's "ad- 
vance" movement and on its outcome, he feels, 
depends in large measure the Church's work for 
several years to come. 



A FULL TIME WORKER HAS BEEN SECURED 
FOR THE MISSION AT TAR LANDING 



Miss Jettie Odell, who was at Tar Landing this 
summer for some special work has accepted 
the invitation of the Bishop to give her whole 
time to work along the Inland Waterway. She will 
live at Tar Landing and help the Rev. Mr. Malone 
with the work at Tar Landing and nearby places. 

Miss Odell was a member of a parish in the Di- 
ocese of North Carolina until she went to Colum- 
bia, S. C, to enter the Columbia Bible School. 
While in Columbia she has been connected with 
the Church of the Good Shepherd of which the 
R n v. Lewis N. Taylor is rector. 

Miss Odell was so much impressed with the 
opportunities for Church work along the Inland 
Waterway, especially at Tar Landing, that she 
gave up a position with the Columbia Bible 
School to return to the Diocese. 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS 



October 1st to November 17th 



October — 
9-24 General Convention, Kansas City, Mo. 
27 St. John's, Winton, 11 :00 A. M. 

St. Peter's, Sunbury, Consecration of new 

Church, 3:00 P.M. 
St. Mary's, Gatesville, 7:30 P. M. 
November — 

3 Christ Church, Creswell, 11:00 A. M. 
Galilee Mission, Lake Phelps, 3 :00 P. M. 
St. Andrew's, Columbia, 7:30 P. M. 

10 St. Thomas', Windsor, Centennial Celebra- 

tion, 11:00 A. M. 
Grace Church, Woodville, 7:30 P. M. 

11 St. Mark's, Roxobel, 7:30 P. M. 

13 Meeting Board of Trustees, Virginia Semi- 
nary. 
14-15 Conference with Presiding Bishop and 
other Bishops, College of Preachers, 
Washington, D. C. 
17 St. Phil's, Beaufort, 11:00 A. M. 
St. Clement's, Beaufort, 3:00 P. M. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



DEPARTMENT MEETINGS 



REV. E. B. FERGUSON ORDAINED DEACON 



The following departments of the Executive 
Council met in St. Mary's, Kinston, September 
2ith and made their reports to the Executive 
Council at a meeting held the next day: 

1. The Department of Christian Education, 
the Rev. E. F. Moseley, Chairman. 

2. Department of Finance, the Rev. John R. 
Tolar, Chairman. 

3. Department of Promotion, Rev. Alexander 
Miller, Chairman. 

4. Department of Evangelism, Rev. Jack R. 
Rountree, Chairman. 

The Department of Christian Social Relations, 
the Rev. Mortimer Glover, Chairman, met early 
in September at Camp Leach and had its report 
ready for the Executive Council. 



REV. STEPHEN GARDNER WILL BE A 
DEPUTY TO THE GENERAL 

CONVENTION 



The Rev. Alexander Miller, who was elected 
Deputy to the General Convention at the time 
of the meeting of our Annual Convention, will be 
unable to attend, and the Rev. Stephen Gardner 
who was the first alternate deputy elected by the 
Convention will attend as a deputy. 

Mr. Miller, who was sick for several months, 
has for some time now attended to all the work 
of his parish and the work of the Promotion De- 
partment of which he is Chairman, but he does 
not think it wise to be away from home for any 
length of time until he has fully recovered his 
health and strength. 

Mr. Miller represented the Diocese at the 
meeting of the General Convention which met in 
Cincinnatti in 1937 and was elected a deputy to 
the meeting to be held in Kansas City this year at 
a time when, on account of his illness, he was un- 
able to attend the meeting of the Convention 
that elected him. Usually only those present at 
a meeting of the Convention are made deputies 
to the General Convention, and his election show- 
ed that he is loved and appreciated by the people 
of the Diocese and that through the years he has 
made many contributions of a high order to the 
work of the Diocese and General Church. 

Mr. Gardner has represented the Diocese at 
several meetings of the General Convention. 



MEETINGS OF THE CONVOCATIONS 



The Convocation of Wilmington will meet in 
St. Paul's, Beaufort, November 19th, and the 
Convocation of Edenton in St. James', Ayden, 
November 20th. 



On Tuesday, September 3rd, in St. Paul's 
Church, Greenville, N. C, Mr. Edward Benjamin 
Ferguson was ordained to the Diaconate by the 
Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Bishop of East 
Carolina. 

The sermon was preached by the Rev. Stephen 
Gardner, Rector of St. Peter's Church, Wash- 
ington, N. C, and the candidate was presented by 
the Rev. Worth Wicker, Rector of St. Paul's 
Church, Greenville. 

The ordination litany was read by the Rev. B. 
F. Huske, D. D., rector of Trinity Church, Lum- 
berton, N. C. 

The newly ordained deacon has been placed in 
charge of St. Paul's Church, Clinton, St. Gabriel's 
Church, Faison, and Grace Church, Whiteville, 
with residence at Clinton, N. C. 



TWO OF OUR CLERGY WERE CALLED INTO 
SERVICE WITH THE NATIONAL GUARD 



The Rev. Worth Wicker, of St. Paul's, Green- 
ville, and Rev. William H. R. Jackson of St. James', 
Ayden, who have been connected with the Na- 
tional Guard for a number of years, have been 
called into service. 

Mr. Wicker, who is Captain of Battery A, 113th 
F. A. will be stationed at Fort Jackson, Colum- 
bia, S. C. 

Mr. Jackson, who is a Chaplain, will also be at 
Fort Jackson. 

Our best wishes go with them, and we shall 
look forward to their return to the Diocese and 
their Parishes at the end of a year. 



REV. JOHN S. ARMFIELD TO SERVE ST. 
PAUL'S, GREENVILLE 



The Rev. John S. Armfield, Minister-in-charge 
of St. Thomas', Ahoskie, and other Churches in 
Hertford and Gates counties, has accepted a 
call recently extended him by the Vestry of St. 
Paul's, Greenville, as curate and acting rector 
during the absence of the rector, the Rev. Worth 
Wicker. 



ST. THOMAS', WINDSOR, WILL CELEBRATE 

ITS 100TH ANNIVERSARY NOVEMBER 

THE TENTH 



A centennial celebration will be observed at 
St. Thomas', Windsor, November 10th, 1940. The 
Bishop will be present, and the former rectors 
have been invited. The Rev. Lewis F. Schenck 
is rector of the Parish. 



OCTOBER, 1940 



General Convention Meets In Kansas City, Mo. 




ipjil 



Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, 
Church center of the diocese of West 
Missouri, host to the General Conven- 
tion which will open October 9. Here 
will be held the Corporate Communion 
of the Youth of the Church and other 
meetings surrounding the Convention. 
The Rt. Rev. Robert Nelson Spencer is 
Bishop of the Diocese; the Very Rev. 
Claude W. Sprouce is Dean of the Ca- 
thedral. 



Skyline of Kansas City, Mo., which 
will greet visitors to the 53rd Triennial 
General Convention which begins Oc- 
tober 9, and will continue for two weeks. 
Sessions of the two houses and the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary Triennial will be held 
in the new Municipal Auditorium. Kan- 
sas City provides every facility for the 
Convention, with many hotels within 
easy reach of the auditorium and nu- 
merous points of interest for the vis- 
itors. 





Exhibit Hall of the Municipal Audi- 
torium, Kansas City, Mo. During the 
General Convention the Exhibit Hall 
will appear much like this, but the 
exhibits will be those of many Church 
organizations, Departments of the Na- 
tional Council, special activities, Church 
institutions and other agencies — all of 
interest to people concerned with the 
Church's work. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



A meeting of the Executive Council of the Di- 
ocese was held in St. Mary's, Kinston, September 
25th, 1940. 

A large part of the time was given to a consider- 
ation of the reports of the departments. 

The plans of the Department of Christian Ed- 
ucation for an Adult Conference to be held at Camp 
Leach a week before the 1941 Senior Camp were 
approved and it was decided to appoint a small 
Committee to prepare a Camp Program, includ- 
ing improvements to property. 

The Department of Christian Social Relations 
presented a full report of the work of its com- 
mittees. It was decided to hold in abeyance the 
suggestions of the Committee on Remarriage and 
Divorce until after the meeting of the General 
Convention. The Farm Colony for Women at 
Kinston, of which the Rev. Jack R. Rountree of 
Kinston is Chairman of the Committee, was en- 
dorsed and the co-operation of the other dioceses 
was requested. 

The Department of Evangelism announced 
plans for clergy conferences, and preaching mis- 
sions, and these were approved. 

Upon recommendation of the Department of 
Promotion, the Program of the General Church 
was adopted as the Program of this Diocese this- 
fall. 

The following resolutions of the Finance De- 
partment were adopted: 

1. A Financial Program of $35,000 for budget 
purposes for 1941. The Department was given 
authority to apportion the $35,000 to the parishes 
and missions, after consultation with some of the 
parishes and missions that have difficulty in rais- 
ing the amounts asked of them. 

2. The reduction of appropriations to parishes 
and missions in 1941 to the extent of the amounts 
of their unpaid apportionments in 1940. It was 
stated that this is necessary if the Diocese is to 
continue to maintain its work. Unless the appor- 
tionments are paid the Diocese will be unable to 
make appropriations. 



NEW BUILDING AT CALABASH, AN INLAND 
WATERWAY MISSION 



A building, which will serve as a home for the 
worker, Miss Elizabeth MacMurray, and a Parish 
House, has just been completed at Calabash, 
Brunswick County. 

The building was made possible by a gift of 
Mr. R. R. Stone, of Wilmington, whose home at 
one time was at Calabash. It will be known as the 
Stone Memorial Building and will be a memorial 
tD his father and mother. 



This building will make possible a program of 
recreation in the community and will serve many 
other useful purposes. 



REV. B. WOOD GAITHER WILL SERVE ST. 

GEORGE'S, LAKE LANDING, AND 

ALL SAINTS', FAIRFIELD 



In addition to his work at St. David's, Creswell, 
St. Andrews', Columbia and Galilee Mission, Lake 
Phelps, the Rev. B. Wood Gaither will serve St. 
George's, Lake Landing and All Saints', Fairfield, 
in Hyde County. 

Mr. Gaither has recently held a Preaching Mis- 
sion at St. George's, Lake Landing. 

The Rev. A. C. D. Noe of Bath and the Rev. 
Stephen Gardner of Washington, will give ser- 
vices to Calvary, Swan Quarter and St. John's, 
Sladesville, the other Churches in Hyde County. 



SANATORIUM IS IN THE DIOCESE OF EAST 

CAROLINA, AND IS SERVED BY THE REV. 
HOWARD ALLIGOOD OF FAYETTEVILLE 



The Rev. Howard Alligood of Fayetteville visits 
the patients at Sanatorium, in Hoke County, as 
often as possible. 

At a meeting of the Executive Council, held in 
Kinston a few days ago, upon recommendation of 
the Department of Christian Social Relations, it 
was decided to provide a fund in 1941 for the 
use of Mr. Alligood in connection with his work at 
Sanatorium. 

For lack of funds, Mr. Alligood has been unable 
to make many trips to Sanatorium, which is 
some distance from Fayetteville, but he has 
gone there as often as possible and his visits have 
meant much to the patients. If enough money 
can be given to cover the travel expense and to 
provide some material for his use on his visits a 
great deal of good can be done. 



REV. B. F. HUSKE WILL GIVE WHOLE TIME 

TO TRINITY. LUMBERTON 



The Rev. B. F. Huske, D. D., who has served 
Trinity, Lumberton, and Grace Church, Whiteville, 
will devote his whole time to the work of Trini- 
ty, Lumberton. The Rev. E. B. Ferguson will 
serve Grace Church, Whiteville. Trinity, Lum- 
berton, has made real progress under the fine, 
constructive leadership of Dr. Huske, and it is 
believed that with regular cervices the parish 
will continue to grow. Lumberton is one of our 
larp-e cities and should have regular services of 
the Church. 



OCTOBER, 1940 



9 



FAITH ENDURES 



The Following Extract is from an Address by 
Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., on "Faith Endures" 



We are presumed to be here as business and 
professional men and women seeking contribu- 
tions to charity. But if we were merely business 
and professional men and women we should not be 
here. I refuse to subscribe to the creed that 
giving to charity is only shrewd business policy, 
for that, I feel, detracts both from the nobility of 
charity and the nobility of business. The obliga- 
tion of business to give rests on higher ground, 
and in my opinion, it is an absolute obligation. 

We are assembled tonight, not as lawyers or 
doctors or business people ; we are here simply as 
men and women of good will, charged with the 
high duty of helping those of our fellows whom 
distress has overtaken. 

Would we be here, did we not hold a firm and 
direct faith ? We have met not to despair. We have 
met in the spirit of helpfulness, and that of it- 
self means we have faith. And, having faith, we 
must have its inseparable mate — hope. And, 
having faith and hope, we must have charity. No 
earthly power can prevail against that trinity, 
for faith, hope and charity spring from and can 
exist only in the presence of a firm and enduring 
belief in a Supreme Being who is all good and all 
powerful. Our nation was founded on that belief. 
The Founding Fathers did not prescribe how we 
were to worship. They refused to distinguish 
between creeds. But by their every word and 
deed they acknowledged God and established the 
principle that the State should never presume to 
make itself the attributes of absolute power. 

Today there seems to be a tendency in many 
quarters to exalt the material above the spirit- 
ual. This is shown in many ways and particular- 
ly in writing lightly of much that we have held as 
fine and clean and decent in our lives. The sim- 
ple ideals do not appear to be as sacred as once 
they were. Yet those ideals are at the very roots 
of our rights as free men. If we permit these 
ideals to be destroyed, our freedom will leave with 
them. 

The reason for this is plain. Our basic law 
springs from the rights and responsibilities of the 
individual. The rights and responsibilities of the 
individual are largely based on our belief in a 
Supreme Being. Without that belief, there can 
be no reason for freedom. - 

It is not by mere chance that some nations 
f hat are governed by absolute dictators make war 
jn religion. They must destroy the dignity and 
importance of man, and that involves the destroy- 
ing the faith in a Divine Providence. Soroet'mes I 



am forced to wonder how anyone can advocate 
those economic systems which, when tested, prove 
to be only systems of life from which the dignity 
and importance of the individual has been re- 
moved. 



FROM LETTER OF SUPPLY SECRETARY, 
MRS. JOHN W. HARDY 



The supply allotment for the Diocese for the 
fall of 1940 is as follows: 

Personal boxes to: 1. The Rev. Thomas N. 
Brincefield, Como, Mississippi; 2. Rev. George 
Walker, Little Rock, Arkansas. 

Woman Missionary: 1. Miss Anne E. Cady, 
Good Shepherd Hospital, Fort Defiance, Arizona. 

Mission: 1. St. Peter's, care of the Rev. An- 
tonio Villafane, Ponce, Puerto Rico. 

I enclose article concerning St. Peter's Mis- 
sion and Mr. Brincefield's work. Miss Cady is a 
medical missionary. The Rev. Mr. Walker is a 
Negro clergyman, who is at present unemployed. 

When and if I can get some information from 
Miss Cady and the Rev. George Walker, I will let 
you have it. 



The two paragraphs following are from a let- 
ter from Mrs. T. K. Wade, national Supply Sec- 
retary. They are self-explanatory: 

"It has been called to our attention that the 
thought behind the sending of gifts to our wom- 
en missionaries has not been entirely understood. 
We wish these gifts to be a gesture of friend- 
ship, and when either a gift or check is sent it 
should be accompanied either by a Christmas card 
or either a short note containing a Christmas 
greeting. 

"This will be my last circular letter to the Di- 
ocesan Supply Secretaries as my retirement takes 
effect on January 1st. May I take this opportuni- 
ty to thank all the women who have so loyally 
helped put over this piece of work during the last 
twenty years and to express the hope that their 
interest will continue in the future." 

Editor's Note: The articles will be published 
in the next issue,. 



REV. AND MRS. JOHN R. TOLAit HAVE 
RETURNED FROM TRIP TO CANADA 



The Rev. and Mrs. John R. Tolar of Fayette- 
ville, have returned from a motor trip to Canada. 
Mr. Tolar is minister-in-charge of St. Philip's, 
Fayetteville, and Chairman of the Finance De- 
partment of the Diocese. Mrs. Tolar is Treasurer 
of !"he Woman'=i Auxiliary of the Diocese. 



Ljoung People's Service League 



By Mary D. Home, Publicity Chairman 



A LETTER FOR YA 



Dear Leaguers: 

Happy New Year! That sounds pretty silly, 
doesn't it — especially in October? But you know 
this really is a new year in League work. And 
its up to us to make the most of it. Let's try 
real hard. 

Did you have a nice summer? I do hope so for 
I certainly did have my share of fun. And it's all 
mixed up with Camp Leach, so that must be the 
reason. All of you who didn't go this summer, 
please try to next. It's a wonderful place full of 
wonderful people, and there's always room for 
one more. 

Well, since I'm going to say so very much lat- 
er on about the Conference, I 'spec I better sign 
off. So best wishes for all sorts of good luck 
this year. 

Sincerely, 

MARY. 
P. S. You might try writing to me sometime. 
Say around the 20th of the month. 



Y. P. S. L. CONFERENCE 



(My Personal Experiences) 

Officers, Counsellors and Clergy of both the 
Diocesan and Parochial units of the Y. P. S. L. in 
East Carolina met at Camp Leach September 2nd 
to 6th for a very inspiring and helpful confer- 
ence. Never in my life have I been so thrilled 
by the presence of God. It was simply splendid. 
There were approximately fifty people there, peo- 
ple with a common interest, a common purpose 
and a determination to get as much as possible 
from the wonderful opportunities offered them. 

Ably directed by the Rev. E. F. Moseley, Chair- 
man of the Department of Christian Education, 
and rector of St. Mary's, Kinston, and assisted by 
Hampton Noe, Diocesan Young People's President, 
the conference boasted an excellent faculty. 

To begin with there was "Robbie," (Miss Anna 
L. Robertson) who taught a course on Y. P. S. L. 
methods. The class was chiefly a discussion of 
the aims and purposes of the League and how to 
achieve them. There was one point in the discus- 
sion of aims (to know, to be and to do) that I 
thought especially important, that was the aim 
to know. Robbie brought out the point that "we 
should strive to KNOW Christ, not only ABOUT 
Him". How true that is. Not only with young 
people, but with everybody. We know a great 
deal about Christ, but do we know Him ? 



While we had the Methods' course, the Coun- 
sellors and Clergy attended a class taught by the 
Rev. Frederick H. Arterton, National Secretary 
for Youth. I am truly sorry that I cannot give 
you an account of this class. I can say, however, 
that if his classes were as wonderful as Mr. 
Arterton himself, an infinite amount of wisdom 
and inspiration was received from his teaching. 

It's rather hard to describe the course in Par- 
liamentary law taught by Rev. Mortimer Glover 
as it was purely technical. But he stressed this 
point in particpular: "The first Principle in par- 
liamentary law is to expedite and smoothe out 
the order of business and not to hinder it. When 
form takes precedence over more important things 
then it's time to throw it out the window." 

Then came a course taught by the Rev. John 
Grainger on Program Building. He gave us ideas 
as to what kind of programs were effective. Pro- 
gram topics that had proved interesting, and 
what constitutes a good program. Then, too, 
Mr. Grainger put on display a great deal of pro- 
gram materials. With all these things there is 
simply no excuse for anyone who attended that 
class to come up with the ever-present program 
complaints — and to say they must resort to the 
"eternal cocoa" method to keep up attendances. 

The Rev. W. Tate Young taught the class on 
worship. And to me, if it is possible to be par- 
tial, it was one of the most interesting. I admit 
that a good deal of it was far beyond my com- 
prehension, for you see, Mr. Young is one of these 
intelligent individuals who believes in testing 
your intellect, rather than talking down to you. 
However, I was deeply impressed by one of the 
things he said. It was put in the form of a 
question. 

"If we say we believe in God, why are we not 
willing to trust Him so implicitly that we accept 
His omnipotence without reservation? I have 
thought about that question so much since I left 
camp. Why is it that our faith in God falters? 
Is it fear ? How can we overcome that fear ? 

Rev. Walter R. Noe taught the class on Fi- 
nance. This course gave us many helpful sug- 
gestions about our money troubles. Then, too, 
Mr. Noe explained exactly where our League mon- 
ey went, and it was simply amazing to find out 
how many of us never knew exactly how the mon- 
ey we sent to the Diocesan Treasurer was spent. 

Then, there at the very heart of our Confer- 
ence were the beautiful and awe inspiring ser- 
vices. Early in the morning the Holy Commun- 
ion, with the ever lovely Vesper service, The Life 



OCTOBER, 1940 



11 



Service and Personal Evangelism Service, and at 
the close of the day short Devotional Services at 
Campfire. 

And besides all of these things the wonderful 
feeling of fellowship that just being at Camp 
gives to one. It is truly the home of friendship. 

So now that we have had both preparation for 
service and inspiration, what will be- <.ur answer 
to Christ's call to today's youth? Wei' with 
such people as were gathere:) there at that Con- 
ference — and others like them thr mghout the 
world — with such people to inspire, lead and sup- 
port us in our work — how can we fail to answer 
His call as He would have us answer it ? 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S THANK OFFERING 



Dear Leaguers: 

As we return to a new year of League work, 
let us also return to a new year of thankfulness. 
Let us all turn to our common expression of our 
thanks to God in the Young People's Thank Of- 
fering. It is not only a duty but a privilege to 
make this offering. Let us, everyone, avail our- 
selves to the full of this sacred right. 
Sincerely, 

GEORGE STENHOUSE,- 
Young People's Thank Offering Secretary. 
Diocese of East Carolina 



GRACE CHURCH, PLYMOUTH 



Grace Church, Plymouth, one of our youngest 
Leagues, is proud of its record in League work 
and hopes to continue in the same way. This is 
our first report and we hope it meets with your 
approval. 

Mr. Wm. B. Daniels, student minister of Grace 
Church for the summer of 1940, and organizer of 
the Young People's Service League in Plymouth, 
has returned to the Virginia Theological Semina 
ry at Alexandria, where he will continue his stu- 
dies for the ministry. Every member of the 
League loved him dearly. We all miss his enthu- 
siasm and inspiring talks. We have all pledged 
ourselves to work harder this coming year and to 
do our very best, so our League will go forward 
and be a credit to Grace Church and to Mr. Dan- 
iels. Judgment of his summer's work depends 
partially on the success of the League. We can- 
not and we will not let him down. 

Mr. Frank Kizer, student minister from Wash- 
ington, N. C, a young man very interested in 
League work, will be with us for the fall, winter 
and spring. For the summer of 1941 we are ex- 
pecting Mr. Daniels to return to us. 



Perhaps it would interest the readers to hear 
about our "Bring a Brick" party." The League 
sponsored a dance at the high school Gym and re- 
alized enough bricks and money to build a much 
needed walk from the street to the main entrance 
of the church. Admission to the party was two 
bricks or ten cents. This party was the League's 
first activity and was a huge success. It required 
one thousand bricks to make the walk. The work 
was done under the direction of Mr. Daniels by 
volunteers from the League. 

Early in September we elected our officers for 
the year 1940-1941. These officers rotate from 
one office to the next every three months. They 
are: President, Jane Reid; Vice President, Jack 
Owens; Secretary, Iris White, and Treasurer, 
Tom Hampton. 

Our budget for the year is fifty-five dollars. 
Next year we hope to increase it to at least sev- 
enty-five. We have twenty-one active members. 

Three of our Leaguers attended the conference 
held at Camp Leach the first of September. They 
were Tom Hampton, Iris White and Mary C. Ca- 
hoon. 

Several times during the conference other 
members from the League attended lectures. Mr. 
William B. Daniels, student minister; Caroline 
Earle, Senior Counsellor; Hope Vail, Counsellor; 
Jane Reid, President; Jack Owens, Vice President; 
Jack Horton and Ren Dupris. We all enjoyed 
every minute spent at Camp Leach, and we are 
looking forward to the conference in 1941. Many 
new ideas which we have already taken up in the 
League originated at the conference. 

The League regrets the loss of several members 
due to going off to college : Miss Becky Ward and 
Meredith Johnson to St. Mary's College ; Miss Bar- 
bara Norman to Winston-Salem College; Mr. 
James Ward to Wake Forest College. These mem- 
bers will continue to be affiliated with the League 
and will be with us again as active members next 
summer. 

At the present time we do not have a Publicity 
Chairman. The President of the League asked 
me as Senior Counsellor to attend to the publicity 
for the time being. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CAROLINE M. EARLE, 

Senior Counsellor. 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLDSBORO 



It looks like St. Stephen's, Goldsboro, is gonna 
have a lotta news for The Searchlight from the 
start we've gotten off to. We had a big opening 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



meeting the other night with an attendance of 
none less than forty-five. We had a brief talk by 
the temporary Chairman of the Parish's Youth 
Committee as to the year's plans. Then followed 
lots of Camp songs, etc., and incidentally a good 
time was had by all. That's just the beginning. 
Just wait till next time. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE STENHOUSE 
Publicity Chairman. 



ST. PAULS, GREENVILLE 



St. Paul's, Greenville, started its League year 
the first Sunday in September, with some brand 
new officers. They are: President, Margaret 
Jones; Vice President, Sammy White; Secretary, 
Margie Jackson; Treasurer, Pat Waldrop; Thank 
Offering Secretary, Hennie Ruth Wichard, and 
Publicity Chairman, Joe Trotman. And best of 
all, we have a new Counsellor, Mr. Wallace Bourne, 
of whom we are very proud. 

To begin with, we have paid our Diocesan dues 
and, I believe, we were the first. Besides that we 
have started a series of programs on the Prayer 
Book, which we think are very interesting. We 
use as our text Bishop Wilson's "Outline of the 
Book of Common Prayer." For our first program 
we had the Christian ministers of Greenville to 
give us a non-Episcopal view of the Prayer Book. 
This gave us a very interesting slant on our 
Prayer Book, for we found that most people have 
no opinion of the Prayer Book because so few 
know anything about it and many are unaware of 
its existence. 

We do hope that other Leagues have had as 
successful a start as we have and that we all have 
the best year ever. 

Respectfully sumbitted, 

JOE TROTMAN, 
Publicity Chairman. 



ST. JOHN'S, WILMINGTON 



The Young People's Service League of St. 
John's, Wilmington; opened their year's program 
with a spaghetti supper on the evening of Septem- 
ber 15th. A large crowd was present, as each old 
member brought one new one. Miss Gladys Boyd, 
the new president presided. Mr. Hampton Noe, 
Diocesan President, and Mrs. Alexander Miller, 
Counsellor-at-larg-e, were present, and made short 
talks, as did ^e Rev. and Mrs. E. W. Halleck. Our 
Counsellor, Mr. Walter Noe, then outlined our 
year's program for us. As a quantity of spaghetti 
was left over, we gave it to two poor families, who 
enjoyed it very much. 



At our next meeting, we adopted our yearly 
budget .... a minimum budget of $400.00 and a 
"hopeful" budget of $580.00, in the five fields of 
service. Reports were made on the Senior Camp 
and the Leadership Training Conference held at 
Camp Leach. Miss Anna King, Treasurer, then 
read us eight letters received this summer from 
various places in the Nation and World that we 
had assisted financially last year. 

We are very grateful for the fact that we won 
the Bishop's Shield last year, and we feel that it 
is a real challenge to our League to go forward 
this year and be of real service to Christ and His 
Church. 

RALPH McCABE 

Diocesan Representative 



REV. E. B. FERGUSON WELCOMED BY 

MEMBERS OF HIS CONGREGATION 

AT MEETING HELD IN CLINTON 



The Rev. E. B. Ferguson, who is now serving 
St. Paul's, Clinton; St. Gabriel's, Faison and 
Gra^e Church Whiteville, was given a hearty wel- 
come to the held by the members of his congre- 
gations at a meeting held in the Community 
Building, September 27th. 

Mr. Algernon Butler, Senior Warden of St. 
Paul's, Clinton, presided over the meeting and 
introduced the speakers, Mr. A. MtL. Graham, 
Treasurer of St. Paul's, and Rev. Walter R. Noe. 

Several local people, who were not members of 
the parish, helped with the musical part of the 
program, and the wife of the Pastor of the Bap- 
tist church gave a humorous reading. 

A number of the local churches were repre- 
sented by their pastors and some of their lay 
people. The Diocese of East Carolina was rep- 
resented by the Executive Secretary. The Bish- 
op wanted to be present but was prevented by 
a previous engagement. 

The meeting was sponsored by a section of 
the Woman's Auxiliary of St. Paul's Parish, of 
which Mrs. F. B. Johnson of Clinton is Chair- 
man. All members of the Auxiliary were pres- 
ent and helped with both the entertainment and 
serving of refreshments. 



REV. W. R. NOE HOLDS MISSION AT 
WRIGHTSVILLE SOUND 



The Rev. Walter R. Noe has just completed a 
preaching Mission at St. Andrew's, Wrightsville 
Sound. The Rev. J. Leon Malone is minister-in- 
charive of this mission. 



OCTOBER, 1940 



13 



MAN MEETS GOD'S POWER 



By Reverend Jack R. Rountree 



Every thinking person is consciously aware of 
the meaning of Paul's words, "when I would do 
good evil is present with me", for one is himself 
constantly undergoing a similar experience. There 
is always a constant warfare going on within each 
one of us between the personal desires and the 
consciousness of the "ought". And more often 
than not, the desire wins and our consciences are 
eased by the simple act of rationalization. 

We all know that we could do a much better job 
of living than we do. We have succumbed to the 
pagan spirit of the age, have compromised our 
deepest convictions and followed the line of least 
resistance. So we fly into tantrums, when opposed ; 
indulge in fantasies to escape reality; neglect 
present duties by rationalization; adjust our mor- 
al ideals to the level of the set with which we are 
affiliated; and fall easy victims to disease and 
impotency through succumbing to strange fears 
and anxieties, whose hidden causes we have long 
since forgotten; and, because of mental inertia, 
employ but one tenth of our mental capacity in 
meeting life. 

Religion? Why religion is a felt necessity to 
which we cling, largely because we are afraid to 
let it go; yet are not willing to pay the price in 
terms of thought and effort and trust to make 
it effective in our lives. 

One merely has to pass along the way of every- 
day life with everyday people to observe innum- 
erable instances of the frustrations and futility 
of so many lives. Isn't it a severe reflection upon 
our Christian religion, when nominal church mem- 
bers by the millions are turning to astrology, 
pseudo-psychology and other isms in an effort to 
find relief from their vague anxieties and helpless- 
ness; and more pathetic still that for the tin.e 
they think that they have made some great dis^ 
covery of power in life? 

Yet an examination of their new-found beliefs 
discloses an immaturity of mind and a basic fal- 
sity that is truly pathetic. Tragic rather, for that 
which they seek has long since been available 
through faith in Jesus Christ. This is no mere 
platitude. It has back of it the testimony of mil- 
lions of lives that have been brought from dark- 
ness to light, from weakness to power, during the 
past two thousand years. 

Writing to the Romans, Paul affirmed that 
"the gospel is the power of God unto salvation, to 
everyone that believeth", and Paul knew. No 
one could seek a more irrefutable argument for the 
tr')th of the claims of Christianity to bring the 



power of salvation into the life of man, than Paul 
himself. It takes a Jesus to account for a Paul. 
And the thinking student of Christianity can dis- 
cover more about Jesus through Paul than he 
can in all the rest of the New Testament person- 
alities. 

Having made every effort within the power 
of scientific, literary and historical research to 
discredit the writings of the New Testament, 
scholars are agreed that at least seven of the 
writings of Paul are of indisputable authenticity. 
If Paul lived and wrote as he did, and the fact is 
admitted, then Jesus lived, suffered, died, rose 
again and brought the power of a new life into 
the world. 

It was no empty boast of Paul's, "I know Him in 
whom I have believed, and am persuaded that He 
is able to keep that which I have committed to 
Him". How did he know? He more than any liv- 
ing man trusted the God and Father of the Lord 
Jesus Christ with utter abandon of his life to Him. 
Only the superficial Christian doesn't like Paul. 

The writings of Paul make the Jesus of history a 
living personality empowering and enriching all 
who come to God through Him. It is Paul who 

brings us to Christ, who shows us the Father. 

For he illustrates in his life and teachings the 
reality and practicality of all that Jesus taught 
and was. Salvation became understandable, as 
Jesus meant it to be, when Paul surrendered his 
life to Jesus and began to live so near to Him 
that eventually he could say out of the fulness of 
a real experience, "I live, yet not I, but Christ 
liveth in me, and the life which I now live in the 
flesh, I live through faith in the Son of God, who 
loved me and gave Himself up for me". 

While many of the categories of Paul's epistles 
are no longer those that are employed in this 
modern age, the truths for which they stand are 
timeless and as vital today as when he wrote. 
Romans, Corinthians, Galatians, Philippians, 
Colossians and Thessalonians ! What commenta- 
ries upon the power of the Gospel of Jesus. What 
light ihes^ earliest of Christian writings throw 
upon the bubse r \uent writings, the Gospels and 
John and Hebrews ? 

But let us go back ceycnd Paul to the facts of 
which these Gospels and Acts tell. Something of 

tremendous importance in its effect upon the 

disciples of Jesus, followed immediately upon 
the discovery of the empty tomb, in which He had 
been sealed, following His crucifixion. Huddled 
together in terror of what the Jews might do to 
them, they were made aware of His presence, 
speaking and eating with them and breathing 
upon them the Holy Spirit. They did become new 
men, transformed bv a conviction and a knowledge 

*bat thft defeat of the Cross had been turned into 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



the world's supreme victory "by his own resurrec- 
tion from the dead". 

Wishful thinking cannot explain their subse- 
quent actions. There is a simplicity and direct- 
ness about them that cohere with the facts of a 
real living experience. Their conduct was not 
that of psycopaths, but of those who, having re- 
ceived new insight into the eternal meaning of 
the life and teachings of their Master, dared to 
attempt to do what He had demanded of them. 

They made no boastful claims of their exalted 
position, did not profess a superior goodness in 
themselves, but protested that what they had to 
give had been first given unto them. It was the 
power of the Gospel of God that sustained them, 
enriched their visions, increased their under- 
standing and moved them by the infusion of the 
Divine Love to follow Him. These facts can be 
explained only by facing a reality. They did oc- 
cur. The Gospel did have power. And its power 
lay in the divine love filling and overflowing 
their lives. 

This can be explained psychologically as the 
integration of their personalities by focussing 
their attention and bringing all their wishes and 
desires into harmony, through the influence of 
a supreme loyalty and devotion. In their Master 
they found personified the manifestation of God 
acting; and they trusted themselves to Him. Now 
all emotions, all desires and wishes, all instinc- 
tive urges were brought under the control of their 
highest ideal. And this opened their hearts and 
minds to the indwelling of Christ's Spirit. 

One cannot escape the mysterious. Even sci- 
ence builds its practical structure of controlling 
the forces of nature upon discoverable, but inex- 
plainable laws of nature. It still speaks but part- 
ly, when it would define life; it has no explana- 
tion of love, or goodness or beauty. All of life is 
full of mystery. And all of life may be used, even 
though we cannot define it. So too God — trans- 
cending the deepest thinking of man ; as some one 
has said, "God is more than we can think" — and 
He can be trusted to move in innumberable mys- 
terious ways His wonders to perform. And the 
greatest of these wonders is what He can do with 
human personality. 

Too many times we have seen bruised, beaten, 
defeated and sinful human beings, lifted from the 
filth of their own evil doings and raised by the 
power ot the Gospel of God to "go and sin no 
more", so enriched by Him that their testimony of 
what He has done carries conviction. 

As we. rend the Gospels and Acts we discover 
that these first disciples of Jesus committed to 



writing things that they had seen with their eyes, 
their hands had touched, concerning the Word of 
Life, and this Gospel had in it the power of life. 
The things that their Master "had taught, He had 
lived. It was the divine in action that they experi- 
enced in Him. And they recounted their experi- 
ences with a naivette that attest their sincerity 
and genuineness. 

One fact is indisputable. As a result of their 
proclaiming the Gospel — which they practiced in 
their lives — they won converts to the lives of 
goodness and love and helpfulness. And we can 
count upon the reality of these experiences. 

Every writing of the New Testament has been 
subjected to a research and investigation in an 
endeavor to discredit or explain away its truth 
and power, but in vain. They have withstood the 
tests of time ; and as we read them today, a divine 
personality shines forth so radiantly and lovingly 
that our hearts burn within us, and we say with a 
Thomas, "My Lord and my God". That is the 
experience of the reader, who seeks for truth. 
It requires an honest mind and a heart moved by 
a deep-felt need. 

Reading the story of Jesus in the Days of His 
Flesh, we are struck with the fact that He did 
expect to save the world from its sins. That He 
expected to accomplish this through the lives and 
teaching of His disciples, and that He expected 
to continue with them, even after the days of His 
flesh. He felt that He could count upon them — 
and He was in them — and their loyalty to Him 
and to His Father to take the gospel into all the 
world, preaching, teaching, initiating into the 
Fellowship. And as they went, and only so, He 
would accompany them and give them strength 
— bringing peace to their souls. 

Nowhere does Jesus ever promise an easy way 
for His followers. Always there will be suffering, 
persecution, misunderstanding and reviling. Evil 
forces will never yield the struggle against God, 
until the final victory shall have been won. He 
assures them that the way will be hard and diffi- 
cult — but the gates of hell shall not prevail a- 
gainst it. 

So even as He must ascend the cross and give 
His life in seeming defeat, we too must die upon 
the Cross with Him — the old self crucified with 
all evil desires and unworthy emotions and false 
thinkings. These must be slain on His cross. But 
the Cross is only the way to victory. For death 
could not hold Him. Easter morning opens with 
a shout of Victory. "He lives: and because He 
lives, I too shall live." 

(To be concluded in the next issue) 



OCTOBER, 1940 



15 



IN MEMORIAM 



Inasmuch as it has pleased Almighty God, in 
His wisdom, to call our friend and co-worker 
Charles W. Easley to his reward, after a life- 
long association with St. Philip's Church, a great 
part of which time he was an active vestryman. 

Be It Resolved: That this memorial of es- 
teem and sympathy be spread on the records of 
St. Philip's Parish, a copy sent to the local news- 
paper, The Mission Herald and a copy sent to 
the family of Charles W. Easley. 

This, the 19th day of September, 1940. 
By the Rector and Vestry, 
St. Philip's Episcopal Church, 
Southport, N. C. 

J. J. LOUGHLIN, JR., Clerk. 



THE REV. VERNON EARL ARTIS RETURNS 

TO BISHOP PAYNE DIVINITY SCHOOL 

FOR SPECIAL WORK 



The Rev. Vernon Earl Artis, who finished his 
course at Bishop Payne Divinity School and was 
ordained Deacon early in the summer, has return- 
ed to school for a year of special work. 

He has served St. Timothy's, Farmville, and 
St. Andrews', Greenville, during the summer 
months, and will have charge of these Churches 
upon his return to the Diocese. 

He needs the help of the people of the Diocese 
in providing a small building for the congregation 
at Farmville. The congregation has a lot, which 
was given by Mrs. Darden of Emmanuel Church, 
Farmville, and can erect a building that will meet 
present needs at a cost of $500.00. Much of the 
labor will be given by members of the congrega- 
tion. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 

GENERAL CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1, 1940 TO DECEMBER 31. 1940 

CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



Pn : d to 
Oct. 71h 
1940 
Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $ 1fis.no 

Clinton. St. Paul's 150.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 1,113.28 

Go'dsboro, St. Stephen's 691.20 

T^noe Mills, Christ Church 64.00 

Kinston, St. Ma'y's 450.00 

Lumberton, Trinitv 43.57 

New Bern, Christ Church 1,202.09 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 25.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' : 

Southport, St. Philip's 146.10 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 21.40 

Whiteville, Grace Church 45.07 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 232.51 

Wilmington, St. James' 6,430.25 

v-invneton, St. John's 1,712.32 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 495.00 



Organized Missions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Campbellton, St. Philip-Apostle 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

North West. All Soul's 

Pikeville, St. George's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 



Unorganized Missions 

Calabash, St. Andrew's 

Polloksville, Mission 

Tar Landing. Mission 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd ... 



P=ud to 

Oct. 71h 

1940 

14.05 

30.00 

22.50 

5.00 

25.00 
10.00 
25.00 



14.16 



4.56 
55.00 



Total $13,192.06 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy C^oss 27.31 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 7.85 

Belhaven, St. James' 79.88 

Bonnerton, St. John's 14.63 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 31.25 

Creswell, St. David's 25.02 

Edenton, St. Paul's 700.00 

Flizabe'h City, Christ Church 823.88 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 37.81 

Greenville, St. Paul's 700.24 

Grifton, St. John's 3.61 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 20.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 250.00 

Jessama, Zion 106.72 

Lake Landing, St. George's 15.4? 

Plymouth, Grace Church - 150.no 

Roper, St. Luke's 27.65 

Washington, St. Peter's 1,477.16 

Williamston, Advent 150.50 



Windsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's ... 



Unorganized Missions 

Avoca, Holy' Innocents' 



Parochial Missions 

Creswell, Galilee Mission 



70.00 

17.79 

162.50 



32.98 



54.45 
31.00 



10.00 

135.00 

40.00 



17.00 



Total $ 5,219.68 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's... 
Wilmington, St. Mark's .... 



Organized Missions 

Belhaven. St. Mary's 

Edenton, St. John the Evangelist 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Washington, St. Paul's 



13.83 
131.00 
110.00 



16.02 
90.00 
16.03 
15.00 
9.89 
20.00 



Unorganized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Farmville, St. Timothy's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X-Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, Brooklyn Mission 



5.22 
14.50 

5. on 
10.00 
19.00 

9.50 



Total -$ 4 84-99 

Grand Total $18,896.73 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- j 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy j 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. ! 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH j 



RECTOR 



* 



THEY ARE ON SALE IN YOUR PARISH 

LARGE, ATTRACTIVE BOOKLETS 

Printed For the 

SILVER JUBILEE OF BISHOP DARST 

Entitled 

"BISHOP DARST AND EAST CAROLINA 

DURING THE PAST TWENTY-FIVE YEARS" 

Price 35 cents 



, .„_, 

THE 


MISSION HERALD 


The Official Church Paper of the 


Diocese 




of East Carolina 




SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.09 A 


YEAR 




Payable In Advance 




Address: THE MISSION HERALD 


Rev. W. R. 


Noe, Editor and Business 


Manager 


I 


Wilmington, N. C. 








INVESTMENTS ! 



We are at all times ready to assist the in- 
vestors in North Carolina in the purchase or 
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We specialize in : 

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ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and li. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



i 



! I 

i I 

I I 

? I 



THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
Wilmington, N. C. 



McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 



Good 'Year Tires 



Exide Batteries 



Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 88 12th & Market Sts. 

Wilmington, N. C. 



LOUIE E. WOODBURY, Jr. 

INSURANCE 

815 Murchison Building 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Phone 84 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter 
continue her education in a Church school. 

MRS. ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, A. M. 
President 

Saint Mary's offers the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades 
of High School and 2 years College work. All acade- 
mic courses fully accredited by Southern Association. 
General charge $700 including tu'tion in Art, Expres 
sion, Home Economics, Music. 

Gym and Field sports. Horseback Riding, Golf, 
Tennis, 20 acre campus and Indoor Tiled Pool. 

Catalogue and Book of Views 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 






1t^' ob 



Jan. 41 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



*• iy. c 






VOLUME LIV 



NOVEMBER, 1940 



NUMBER fj 




THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



100TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION, 
ST. THOMAS', WINDSOR 



Published Monthly except July and August at 
507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Editor 

REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 

Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 



Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 



Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 



DEATH OF TWO OF OUR RETIRED 
CLERGYMEN 



The Rev. John Benners Gibble, of Wilmington, 
died on October 13. Mr. Gibble was born in 
Beaufort, N. C., on July 15, 1866, and was ordained 
to the priesthood in 1893 by Bishop Watson. He 
married Miss Augusta Jocelyn Moore, who sur- 
vives him, on October 19, 1899. His first charge 
was as assistant rector at St. James, Wilming- 
ton, and in charge of the Chapel of the Good Shep- 
herd, Wilmington. His last charge was as Rector 
of the Church of the Good Shepherd. He was 
rector of St. Luke's Church, Denison, Texas, 
from 1895 to 19Q1 ; Rector of St. Paul's Church 
Butte, Monana, from 1901 to 1906 ; Rector of St. 
Thomas' Church, Windsor, N. C, from 1906 to 
1911 ; Rector of the Church of the Holy Comfort- 
er, Burlington, N. C, from 1911 to 1922 and the 
Church of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington, from 
1922 to 1934, at which time he retired. He was 
twice Deputy to the General Convention and was 
a trustee of St. Mary's School and Junior College, 
Raleigh, from 1924 to the time of his death. He 
also served as Chairman of the Diocesan Commit- 
tee on Insurance of Church Property. 

The Rev. Herbert Dunbar Cone was born on 
June 1, 1856 at Gustavus, Ohio, and was ordained 
to the priesthood in 1891 by Bishop Leonard. He 
served Churches in Ohio, Connecticut, New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Vermont. His 
last charge was St. Paul's, Clinton, N. C, which 
he served from 1925 to 1929, at which time he 
retired. 



Sunday, November 10th, the one hundredth 
anniversary of St. Thomas', Windsor, the Rev. 
Lewis F. Schenck, Rector, was celebrated. 

The sermon was preached by the Bishop of the 
Diocese and the historical sketch was read by the 
Rector of the Parish. 

Two of the former Rectors, the Rev. Walter R. 
Noe of Wilmington, and Rev. A. S. Gibson, Rector 
of Trinity, Manassas, Virginia, were present and 
took part in the service. Other Clergy present 
for either the service or the lunch were Rev. 
Charles A. Ashby, Rector of St. Pul's, Edenton; 
Rev. Stephen Gardner, St. Peter's, Washington; 
and Rev. John W. Hardy, Church of the Advent, 
Williamston. Lay people from ten or twelve Par- 
ishes were present. 

After the sermon, the Rector presented to tine 
Bishop fourteen candidates for Confirmation, the 
largest class in the history of the Parish. 

Special music was presented by the choir. 

Lunch was served to all visitors at the home of 
Judge and Mrs. F. D. Winston. 

November 10th was the birthday of our Bishop, 
and during the luncheon period a birthday cake 
was presented to him. 



WILLING TO MAKE ADDITIONAL PAYMENT 
ON THE DIOCESAN DEBT 



An East Carolinian now living in the Diocese 
of North Carolina, has just written us as follows: 

"I paid my $2.00 last year for Church Debt as 
was requested. If the debt is not all paid, I will 
pay more. If all the members would give some 
money for that cause, the debt could be canceled 
this year." 



SINCE OUR REPORT IN THE JUNE ISSUE OF 
THE MISSION HERALD THE FOLLOW- 
ING PAYMENTS ON THE DEBT 
HAVE BEEN MADE 



*Clinton, St. Paul's, $109.00; Fayetteville, St. 
John's, §166.61 ; Goldsboro, St. Stephen's, $100.00; 
Hope Mills, Christ Church, $4.00; New Bern, 
Christ Church, $1.00; Elizabeth City, Christ 
Church, $23.41; Hertford, Holy Trinity, $2.00; 
Plymouth, Grace Church, $5.00; ^Washington, 
St. Peter's. $636.00; Tolar Hart, Good Shepherd, 
$2.14; Windsor, St. Thomas', $4.00; Winton, St. 
John's, $6.00; Snow Hill, St. Barnabas', $30.00; 
Fayetteville, St. Joseph's, $10.00; Wilmington,. 
St. Paul's, $2.00. 

* Final payment. 




ission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C, NOVEMBER, 1940 



NUMBER 9 



THE PASTORAL LETTER 



Brethren of the Clergy and Laity: 

Faith! Courage! Consecration! These are 
the watchwords of the Christian life. The mis- 
sion of the Church is to stamp them indelibly on 
the world. 

We are sending this message to you in a criti- 
cal time. Three continents are in the throes of a 
devastating war. The enlistment of the young 
manhood of America for military training reveals 
how impossible it is for a nation to live unto itself 
alone. In these times which try men's hearts we 
would stress above all else the deeper spiritual 
facts and issues of life ; not only because they are 
the Church's chief responsbility, but because the 
quality of the spiritual life determines what we 
are and what we do. We believe that we are in 
our present tragic state because men have tried 
to live for themselves with little thought of God 
and His will. For the causes of our plight we are 
to search first our own hearts. God cannot use us 
save as we confess and forsake our sins ; but the 
doctrine of His redemption need not hinder pres- 
ent endeavor, nor lessen our faith in the future. 

More than treaties, more than victories by 
force of arms, more than methods of social, polit- 
ical and economic planning, we need, in heroic 
and sacrificial living, the reaffirmation of God's 
eternal purpose. Among all the conflicting inter- 
ests and loyalties of our day, we must put first 
the cause of Christ and His Church. 

In a period in which the denial of all good, as 
we Christians hold it, threatens to be triumphant, 
we have to learn the bitter lesson that militant 
falsehood gains the ascendency over half-hearted 
devotion to truth. Purity of life and freedom of 
spirit, economic justice and the brotherhood of 
nations, the acknowledgement of God as our Fa- 
ther, of Christ as our Savior, the Holy Spirit as 
a source of strength, and of man as a child of God, 
must be fought for, generation by generation, day 
in and day out, by each and every one of us. 

The Christian Gospel proclaims the eternal 
worth and dignity of every human soul. The rec- 
ognition of this is not only the reasonable founda- 
tion for our faith in democracy but is likewise in- 
dispensible to the progress and highest good of 
people under any form of government. The Gos- 



pel, by its very nature, abhors all regimentation, 
all totalitarian schemes of mass control, all claims 
of class or racial superiority and all economic in- 
justices, because they deny the sacredness of hu- 
man personality. 

The Church must stand boldly for freedom of 
conscience, of speech and worship. In the Chris- 
tian religion is found, for all men everywhere, the 
hope of social progress, the conquest of poverty, 
of disease and of every condition that makes for 
moral failure and degradation. 

Throughout the world there are countless thou- 
sands suffering from human selfishness and cruel- 
ty, who need our sympathy and help. The story 
of homeless refugees warns us to be on our guard 
against the forces that build national or racial 
hatred. We have no defense for those who use 
their freedom as a cloak for disloyalty, but we 
who remember the mistakes and injustices of a 
generation ago should plead for balanced reason 
and tolerance, now, while there is a chance to be 
heard. We must stand squarely against hate. 
We must remember that there are, in every land 
and in every race, children of God, our brethren 
under a common Fatherhood. We call upon our 
people to remember them in prayer and to keep 
alive the strong bond of Christian love and under- 
standing, through which, please God, a new world 
of hope will be built. 

A great opportunity is before us in our nation 
and among our people. The threatening forces 
that are abroad in the world must move us toward 
spiritual solidarity. They must make us patient, 
kindly affectionate one toward another. Diversity 
of opinion there is bound to be, but let there be 
no breaking of the fellowship. Differences of 
theory as to the ways and means of working and 
sacrificing for a better world, yes, but surely no 
lack of u^ity in our purpose. 

We pray that ^ar people will do everything pos- 
sible to further the cause jf unity among the 
churches. We must strive for ih.3 day #hen 
Christians, without either uniformity or regi- 
mentation, will bring to bear upon the world's 
need the power of a church that is of one heart 
and mind in the Faith of our Lord and Savior Je- 
sus Christ. 

The Presiding Bishop in his Convention ser- 
mon calls upon us to advance vigorously along the 
A'hole front of our life and work. And again in 



THE MISSION HERALD 



his address to the Joint Session of Convention he 
urges us to more complete dedication of ourselves 
to God in a deepening sense of stewardship. He 
proposes a definite program for a period of ten 
years with a common objective, whose elements, 
personal evangelism and religious education, will, 
year by year, result in an aroused Church and a 
more thoroughly Christian America. 

Despite great accomplishments under the lead- 
ership of our Forward Movement Commission, 
there are still thousands of church members who 
treat with indifference their Baptismal vows and 
Confirmation promises. It is not uncommon for 
people who call themselves Communicants of this 
Church to repudiate the very charter of her Di- 
vine Commission and, by word or deed, to declare 
null and void our Lord's command that we go into 
all the world and preach the Gospel to every crea- 
ture. 

Does not the fault lie in our failure to educate 
our people in the standards, the nature and the 
mission of the Church ? Is it not true that often 
poorly instructed and but half-converted candi- 
dates are presented for Confirmation ? Brethren, 
this weakens the Church of God. Furthermore it 
does grave injustice to those whom we would add 
to our life. There is ample testimony that wher- 
ever clergy and laity courageously present the 
full privilege and obligation of Church member- 
ship, in the long run, they receive the greatest 
response. 

Forward is still to be our watchword in the 
reinvigoration of the life and rehabilitation of the 
work of the Church. We are to bring God into 
our lives and let Him use us. A creed of action 
hand in hand with a creed of belief ! Either will 
perish without the other. Every ideal expressed 
must be reduced to the terms of what we as indi- 
viduals and as congregations can do to serve our 
Lord and our fellow men, here and now — in our 
homes, in our parishes, in our Nation and in our 
World. We are to show forth the quality of mer- 
cy in our work, for the relief of suffering human- 
ity. All that we do will be in the name of Christ, 
so that every effort may be imbued with His spir- 
it, which ministers to the soul as well as to the 
body. 

The neglect of private devotions and public 
worship impoverishes life and hinders God's pur- 
pose and work. One of our highest privileges is 
that of gathering with other members of God's 
family at the regular services and especially at 
the Celebraton of the Holy Communion. But let 
us not forget that such acts are as surely in the 
line of Christian duty as they are in the realm of 
Christian privilege. 



We affirm and reaffirm the fact of the Church's 
mission to the entire world. We will not falter in 
our purpose nor be dismayed by the difficulties 
arising on every hand. The very barriers that 
have been raised against the Church are the best 
evidence of man's need, everywhere, of the Gos- 
pel of our Lord. We will remember that behind 
those barriers are great numbers of men and 
women, our brothers and sisters in a common 
Faith. Should we fail them, we fail Him! 

We believe, as the past abundantly testifies, 
that the power of evil will not prevail against the 
Church of Christ. And we cannot but be moved 
to deeper loyalty and redoubled effort by the ex- 
amples of courage and self-sacrifice of numberless 
Christian missionaries and followers of Christ, 
who have counted all else as nothing for His 
sake. Our missionaries everywhere must be giv- 
en assurance that we are with them in prayer and 
supportng them by sacrifiicial work and gifts. We 
will not take counsel of fear but go forward in 
faith ! 

Our Christian brethren in England are sadly 
curtailed in ability to support their missionary 
work abroad. Surely it behooves us, here in Am- 
erica, where we have not been immediately touch- 
ed by the destruction and agony of war, to do 
everything in our power to help carry on the 
work of the Mother Church, while the men and 
women of it, their churches and their homes be- 
ing blown to pieces, their means of livelihood be- 
ing destroyed, in constant peril of their lives, 
fight against the threat of monstrous oppression 
both of themselves and of the rest of the world. 

Finally brethren, it is ours by precept and ex- 
ample to give men faith — faith in God our Father, 
in our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit ; 
faith in the forgiveness of sins and in the life 
everlasting. 

We will remember whence comes this faith by 
which we live. Not certainly out of a time of ease 
and comfort, of freedom from stress and strain. 
But out of the agony of the Savior on the Cross. 
Out of the blood of the martyrs which is the seed 
of the Church. Out of the sacrifices of the hosts 
of the faithful of a thousand generations. 

'What we have at so great a price, we cannot 
keep for less ! 

Brethren, may the Almighty God, who has cre- 
ated us in His own mage; Grant us grace fear- 
lessly to contend against evil and to make no peace 
with oppression ; and, that we may reverently use 
our freedom, may He help us to employ it for the 
attainment of justice among men and nations, to 
the glory of His name; through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. Amen. 



NOVEMBER, 1940 



A Message From Our Bishop 



The great call to the Church as sounded forth 
by our Presiding Bishop, is GO FORWARD IN 
SERVICE, and I believe that we of East Carolina 
are ready and willing to respond to that high call. 

In order to do so, we must not only maintain our 
present missionary work in the sixty places in our 
Diocese which we are now helping to support, but 
we must carry the blessed message of Christ and 
His Church to many neglected and forgotten com- 
munities, whose people need us so sadly. 

Aside from our regular missionary work carried 
on by more than twenty faithful missionary cler- 
gy in more than twenty counties in East Carolina, 
we must GO FORWARD and provide for the fol- 
lowing special needs : 

1. A modest, inexpensive building for the work 
at Tar Landing on the Inland Waterway. 



2. More adequate salaries for our faithful wo- 
men workers at Calabash and Tar Landing. 

3. Church buildings for our promising colored 
missions at Farmville and Sladesville. 

4. Assistance to local communicants in provid- 
ing salaries for at least two additional clergymen 
in vacant fields. 

5. Provision for the employment of a full time 
Field Secretary for Religious Education and Young 
People's Work. 

We must GO FORWARD with the healing mes- 
sage of Christ to a broken world. We must help 
our stricken Mother Church of England carry on 
her great missionary work throughout the world 
and in order to do this, we must strengthen the 
work of our own Diocese, for unless we are strong 
at home, we cannot help the work of the world. 



FINANCIAL PROGRAM-1941 



At the Annual Convention of 1940, a Program 
of $35,000.00 for 1941 for Diocesan and General 
Church Work was adopted and at a recent meet- 
ing of the Executive Council the Finance Depart- 



ment was authorized to apportion the $35,000 to 
the several Parishes and Missons. 

The details of the Program are as follows : 



PROBABLE SOURCES OF INCOME 

Apportionments of Parishes and Missions $35,000.00 

General Church Appropriation 2,500.00 

Specials and Investments 6,500.00 



$44,000.00 



BUDGET NEEDS 



General Church Quota $ 

Bishop's Salary 

Executive Secretary's Salary 

Treasurer 

Secretary of Annual Convention 

Bishop's Office Expense 

Bishop's Travel Expenses 

Maintenance Bishop's House 

Expenses of Committees , 

Office Secretary 

Printing and Postage 

Expenses-Diocesan Office, Rents, etc. 
Travel Expenses, Executive Secretary 



7,000.00 Printing Journal 

5,000.00 Synod 

2,670.00 Expenses, Annual Convention 

360.00 Presiding Bishop's Salary 

180.00 Insurance, Bishop's House 

44000. Treasurer's Bond 

550.00 Bishop's Pension 

250.00 Interest 1,000.00 

360.00 Salaries of Missionary Clergy and 

1,200.00 Other Workers 21,000.00 

250.00 Pension Assessments 1,300.00 

440.00 Mission Herald Appropriation 300.00 

475.00 



250.00 
300.00 
150.00 
120.00 
100.00 
25.00 
150.00 



^43,870.00 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE CHURCH MEANS BUSINESS 



A Discussion of the General Program of the Church for 1941, 1942, 1943, as Adopted by the 
General Convention at Kansas City, Mo., October 9-19, 1940 



By Rev. Morlimer Glover, Rector of Si. James', Wilmington, And Deputy to the General Convention 



In this world of confusion, uncertainty and ra- 
pidly changing conditions it is difficult for any in- 
stitution to plan ahead very far with any assur- 
ance. The Church is quite conscious of this 
fact; yet her representatives in General Conven- 
tion were determined that the difficulties of 
this present time should not betray the Church 
into fatal hesitation, or swerving aside from her 
great Mission of presenting Christ as the only 
hope of salvation for all men and nations. 

The answer to attacks upon our precious heri- 
tage of faith hope, and love is not retreat, or 
mere defense; definitely it is counter-attack. 
In this spirit, the Church is determined upon 
vigorous prosecution of all her work, and has 
adopted a program for the next triennium that 
will truly challenge the interest and effort of 
every man among us, and yet is sufficiently elas- 
tic to be accomodated to whatever circumstances 
or conditions may arise. 

The task of adapting the program, as ne- 
cessity arises, has been committed to the Pre- 
siding Bishop and the National Council ; but 
this does not mean that the Church is seek- 
ing to evade any responsibility, or to side-step 
any obligation. On the contrary, the program 
adopted is bold and aggressive, and if the at- 
titude of her delegates in Kansas City is any 
criterion the Church means business and means 
it in a big way. The cry of the next few years 
will be "Forward in Service". 

The first step in the advancing program is 
to make the Forward Movement a permanent 
part of the Church's work and incorporate its 
functions with those of the National Council 
under the direction of the Presiding Bishop. The 
success of this Movement during the past six 
years has been recognized throughout the Church. 
Its purpose has been the bringing of our Church 
Membership into closer personal relationship with 
the Christ. This was the first call of the Master 
to those whom He had chosen. "To be with Me," 
is the first step of Discipleship. Only as we 
respond to that call are we ready to be sent 
forth. The fundamental nature of this prin- 
ciple in any program of Christian action has been 
recognized by the incorporation of this work as 
the primary function of the executive body of 
our Church. 

The Presiding Bishop has been authorized to 



devise a long range program of objectives and 
advances for the Church, and to bring forward 
and press on each step of this program as op- 
portunity affords and conditions permit. 

General Convention determined that the time 
had come for a return to the system of Appor- 
tionments in dividing up the financial load of 
the General Church budget among the several 
dioceses and districts. In the past few years 
there has developed a great discrepancy in the 
giving of the various dioceses and districts in 
proportion to their ability and the amount they 
spend on their own work. Consequently, it 
seemed fair to ask each diocese for a definite 
portion of the total needed. This apportion- 
ment to be based upon four factors ; first, its 
own current expenses ; second, communicant 
strength ; third, past record of giving ; and fourth, 
local conditions that might affect its ability to 
give. 

Under this system the apportionment for the 
Diocese of East Carolina will probably be about 
$7,000.00, which is more than our mathematical 
share, but a fair estimate of our ability and wil- 
lingness and past record of giving for the great- 
est Cause in the world. 

In returning to this system of apportionment 
General Convention took occasion to reaffirm the 
Partnership Principle; that is, the adoption of a 
fair division of income between each diocese 
and the National Church, and between each par- 
ish and its diocese; and also advocated tithing 
as a definite, clear, and practical method of es- 
tablishing the base of an individual Christian's 
giving to religious, educational, and charitable 
objects. 

In confidence that the Church means to go 
forward and not back in these times, General 
Convention adopted a program of work beyond 
what we have been doing in 1940. The only way 
this program can be expressed in a short space 
is in terms of money alloted in the budget to 
various items ; but back of these figures lie the 
hopes, the visions, the efforts and the sacrifice 
of missionaries, workers, and givers at home and 
abroad, who are determined that the Cause of 
Christ shall not be defeated, nor His banner 
retreat in these days of peril and storm. In terms 
of money the program may seem cold and dull, 
but in terms of hves it is warm and thrilling. 



NOVEMBER, 1940 



The first and largest item in the General 
Church budget is, of course, the appropriation for 
our missionary work at home and abroad, in- 
cluding $834,318.00 for foreign work; $969,531.00 
for domestic work. In the domestic appropriation 
the special fields of College Work, Youth Work, 
and Negro Work are given separate place and 
special emphasis. 

The uncertain conditions in China and Japan 
have been taken into consideration in the budget 
adopted. If American missionaries are forced to 
leave Japan there will be added expenses for trav- 
el, and salaries must be contnued until they find 
appointments elsewhere. Our educational and 
hospital work in the Far East is greatly in need 
of increased support, although no appropriation 
will be made for repairs and rebuilding under pre- 
sent conditions. But on the other hand, institu- 
tions in Japan may by the new Japanese law be 
excluded from receiving contributions from us. 
In view of these uncertain circumstances, General 
Convention made normal appropriations for work 
in China and Japan, but with instructions to the 
National Council to allocate these sums in accord- 
ance with developments. If additional appropria- 
tion becomes imperative sums must be taken from 
other fields; while in the event the full amount 
appropriated for Japan and China cannot be used 
effectively in those countries, the unexpended ap- 
propriations will be available for other mission- 
ary fields of our church, for restoration of cuts in 
missionaries' salaries, for financing new work of 
urgent importance, and for aid to British mission- 
ary work beyond what may be raised through the 
special appeal which will be discussed later on in 
this article. 

For Educational and Promotional Work of the 
Church the sum of $128,008.00 has been appropri- 
ated. This is far too little to enable our De- 
partments of Christian Education, Christian So- 
cial Relations, and the Woman's Auxiliary to do 
effective work, or our Department of Promotion 
to give proper publicity to the Program of the 
Church. Our work in these fields has been great- 
ly hampered in recent years by lack of funds ; but 
in view of diminishing support the Church has 
had to cut these departments down to this dis- 
tressingly low figure. 

For the expenses of authorized Commissions 
and Conferences authorized by General Conven- 
tion, and for such cooperating agencies as the 
Girl's Friendly Society, Church Mission of Help, 
Church Periodical Club, and World and Federal 
Councils of Churches $58,740.00 has been bud- 
geted. This is a minimum that can be expended 
for these activities and agencies if they are to 
accomplish any sort of effective results. 



Administrative expenses for the whole world- 
wide organization of the Church, including office 
salaries and expenses of departments and divi- 
sions, equipment and maintenance, staff insur- 
ance, retirement allowances, and other contingen- 
cies total $245,250.00, which is a very small allow- 
ance considering the extent of the territory to be 
covered, the needs and condition of our property 
at national headquarters, and the vast amount of 
administrative detail necessary to supervise the 
extensive program of our Church throughout the 
world. 

The total budget authorized for 1941 is thus in 
the sum of $2,235,847.00, which is about 10 per 
cent more than we have been doing this year. If 
the pledges of the people do not come up to this 
amount the National Council has been instructed 
to cut down the appropriations to a figure within 
the sum they are told they may expect to receive, 
but if, as the Convention confidently expected, 
pledges come up to the amount of the budget, or 
beyond, the figures for 1942 and 1943 may be 
advanced and the Church begin a march back to 
the point she was forced to abandon during the 
depression. 

In addition to the regular budget of the Church 
the Presiding Bishop has been authorized by Gen- 
eral Convention to make a special appeal for $300, 
000. CO to aid British missionary work throughout 
the world seriously crippled by war conditions. 
The Convention believes our people will recognize 
a special obligation laid upon our Church to dem- 
onstrate the integrity and invincibility of the his- 
toric faith of the Anglican Communion, and be- 
lieves that our people will respond generously to 
this opportunity to return to our Mother Church 
something of the aid and support that was lav- 
ished upon our own Colonial Church in the days 
of its infancy. 

Such is the program our General Convention 
has adopted for the Church to follow during the 
next triennium, and such is the budget that must 
be raised if this program is to be carried out suc- 
cessfully. It is an aggressive program, some peo- 
ple think a daring one, but if the spirit of our peo- 
ple rises to that of their representatives in Gen- 
eral Convention it can be carried out. These are 
times that call for faith and daring, and General 
Convention dared to believe that the Church real- 
ly means business in the face of present day chal- 
lenges and attacks upon her ideals and princi- 
ples and that her people are ready to rise in 
service and sacrifice to the great task of the 
salvation of the world through the Gospel of 
our Lord Jesus Christ. 

A condensed copy of the National budget for 
1941 follows: 



THE MISSION HERALD 



INCOME 

From Quotas of Dioceses and Districts $1,535,847 

Interest from Trust Funds and Miscellaneous 

Sources 440,000 

United Thank Offering 260,000 

$2,235,847 
Special Appeal or British Churches 300,000 

$2,535,847 



EXPENSES 

I. MISSIONARY WORRK 

(Including executive salaries but not 
office salaries and expense) 

a. Foreign, including Latin America $834,318 

b. Domestic, including Extra con- 

tinental 795,066 

c. First Vice President of National 

Council in charge of Missions, 

Salary and Travel Expense 9,224 

d. College Work 21,574 

e. Youth Work 7,069 

f. Amer. Church Inst, for Negroes 136,598 

Total $1,803,849 



80.7% 



II. .EDUCATION AND PROMOTION 
(Including executive salaries but not 

office salaries and expense) 

a. Dept. of Christian Education .... $ 17,751 

b. Department of Christian Social 

Relations 12,108 

c. Department of Promotion 66,184 

d. Woman's Auxiliary 31,965 

Total $128,008 

III. MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES 

a. Forward in Service $ 10,000 

b. Conferences, Training Centers 24,240 

c. Commission on Ecclesiastical Re- 

lations - 2,500 

d. American Churches in Europe .. 1,000 

e. Refugee Work 5,000 

f. Universal Christian Council for 

Life and Work 1,000 

Total $ 43,740 

IV. COOPERATING AGENCIES 

a. Girls" Friendly Society $ 2,500 

b. Church Mission of Help 6,000 

c. Church Periodical Club 4,000 

d. World Council of Churches 1,000 

e. Federal Council of Churches (in 

part) 1,500 

Total , $ 15,000 

V. ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES 
Office Salaries and Expense of 

Departments and Divisions: 

a. Foreign Missions $ 10,541 

b. Domestic Missions 5,943 

c. College Work 1,287 

d. Youth Work 1,483 

e. Christian Education 4,646 

f. Christian Social Relations 4,310 

g. Promotion 40,710 

h. Woman's Auxiliary 10,619 

Sub Total $ 79,53& 

General: 

i. Department of Finance ..- $ 40,181 

j. General Administration 25,884 

k. Office Equip, and Maintenance 24,397 

1 Church Missions House 24,478. 



5.7% 



2.0% 



.6% 



m. Shipping Department 6,474 

n. Book Store 3,618 

o. Staff Insurance 11,000 

p. Retired Workers 6,729 

q. Other Accounts 18,950 

r. Contingent Fund 4,000 

Sub Total $165,711 

Total „„ $245,250 11.0% 

Total I to V $2,235,847 100.0% 

VI. AID TO BRITISH MISSIONS 

Relief for Mission fields of the An- 
glican Communion whose support 
has bsen seriously affected by 
war conditions $300,-000 



GRAND TOTAL $2,535,847 



THANKSGIVING OFFERING 



The Thanksgiving Offering is for the Thomp- 
son Orphanage, and it is hoped that the people of 
East Carolina will be very generous this year. Mr. 
and Mrs. M. D. Whisnant of this Diocese are now 
in charge of the work there and it will mean a 
whole lot to them as well as to the children for 
the work to be properly supported. There are 
several East Carolina children, who might be re- 
ceived into the Orphanage this fall. They will 
need our interest and support. 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS 



November- 



17 
19 



20 

22 
24 



25 



26 



St. Mark's, Wilmington, 8:00 P. M. 
Convocation of Wilmington, St. Paul's, Beau- 
fort. Laymen's meeting, St. Paul's, Green- 
ville, 5:00 P. M. 

Convocation of Edenton, St. James', Ayden. 
Parish Supper, Christ Church, New Bern. 
St. Stephen's, Goldsboro, 11:00 A. M. 
Joint meeting of the two Y. P. S. L Convoca- 
tions. St. Mary's, Kinston, 4:00 P. M. 
St. Mary's, Kinston, 8:00 P. M. 
Dedication of Stone Cottage, Calabash, 3:00 
P. M. 
Layman's meeting at Clinton, 5:00 P. M. 



December — 

6 Will begin Mission at the Church of the Ad- 
vent. Birmingham. 

13 Parish Supper, Williamston. 

15 Church of the Advent, Williamston, 11:00 
A. M. 
St". Martin's, Hamilton, 7:30 P. M. 



NOVEMBER, 1940 



MEETINGS OF THE CONVOCATIONS 



Convocation of Wilmington, Beaufort, 
November 19, 1940 



Convocation of Edenton, Ayden, 
November 20, 1940 






Celebration Holy Communion, 10:00 A. M. 
Meeting Woman's Auxiliary, 11:00 A. M. 

Greetings. 

ReGponse. 

Roll Call. 

Minutes. 

Report of President of Convocation. 

Address — Diocesan President, Mrs. L. J. Poisson. 

A Visitor's Impression of the General Conven- 
tion, Mrs. Paul Simpson. 

The Offerings of the Children of the Church, Mrs. 
W. R. Noe. 

Noon Day Prayer. 

Evangelism, Rev. J. R. Rountree. 

Inland Waterway Mission, Miss Elizabeth Mc- 
Murray. 

Address — The National Council and the Parish, 
Mrs. H. J. MacMillan. 

Educational Department, Mrs. Donald MacRae. 

Youth Movement, Miss Hallie Townes. 

Supply Department, Mrs. John Hardy. 

Lunch. 

2:00 P. M. 

Our Mission in the Philippines, Miss Elizabeth 
Griffin. 

United Thank Offering, Mrs. Frank Fagan. 

Student Work, Mrs. P. W. Pickelsimer. 

Field Department, Mrs. Charles F. Green. 

Christian Social Relations, Mrs. Sam Fowle. 

Church Periodical Club, Mrs. Sidney Ward, Sr. 

Publicity Department, Mrs. Alwyn Darden. 

Address, Rt. Rev. T. C. Darst. 

Closing Prayer and Benediction. 



NOVEMBER CALENDAR 



All Saints' Day 1 

Quiet Day of Prayer _ __ 11 

Convocation of Wilmington.... 19 

Convocation of Edenton... 20 

Thanksgiving Day 28 

St. Andrew's Day .30 

May we remember this Thanksgiving Day the 
opportunity and privilege we have in contributing 
to the Thompson Orphanage. 

Quiet Day of Prayer will be held in our churches 
on Armistice Day. It is suggested that you have 



a Program on Peace in preparation for this day. 

The women of the Church throughout the 
Diocese of East Carolina must rally to the call of 
the Presiding Bishop when the 1940 Every Mem- 
ber Canvass begins this Fall. Last Fall the slogan 
was "The Forward March of the Church" This 
Fall it is "Keep On Going Forward". 

The Church depends upon you, your work, your 
prayers, and your gifts. Your Bishop and your 
Rector depend upon you. Be an asset to your 
Parish, to your Diocese, and to the National 
Church. 



CHRIST CHURCH, ELIZABETH CITY 



A delightful tea honoring the new members 
of Christ Church, Elizabeth City, was the oc- 
casion of the first fall meeting of the Woman's 
Auxiliary. 

The women assembled in the chapel of the 
Parish House where the business part of the 
meeting was conducted by the president, Mrs. 
A. B. Houtz. 

Mrs. Houtz asked the rector, the Rev. Geo. F. 
Hill to open the meeting with appropriate pray- 
ers. 

Mrs. Houtz gave a word of greeting and dis- 
cussed matters of business. 

Miss Catherine Albertson paid tribute in 
words of praise and appreciation to Mrs. C. W. 
Melick, former president of the Auxiliary, who 
served in that capacity for twenty seven years. 

Mrs. Melick thanked Miss Albertson and she in 
turn paid tribute to the life of Miss Grace Lind- 
ley, one of the Auxiliary's most faithful lead- 
ers. 

Mrs. Geo. F. Hill welcomed the new members 
into the Parish and the Auxiliary then in- 
vited the women to the attractive and homelike 
Club Room where delicious refreshments were 
served and a social hour of getting together 
and knowing one another was enjoyed. 

MRS. GEORGE F. HILL, Publicity Chairman 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, WINTON 



Bishop Darst visited us on Sunday, October 27. 
He administered the Holy Communion and preach- 
ed a never-to-be forgotten sermon. We had a 
capacity congregation, members from Ahoskie, 
Murfreesboro, and Winton, as weTl as memoers 
of all denominations in the community tool* this 
(Continued on Page 15) 



Ifoung People's Service League 



By Mary D. Home, Publicity Chairman 



CONVOCATIONAL MEETINGS 



Both the Edenton and Wilmington Convoca- 
tions will hold their fall meetings in Kinston on 
November 24 beginning at 4:00 o'clock and end- 
ing with a Fellowship Banquet at 6:00 P. M. 

The meeting will be conducted by Belle Ray 
Tillinghast, first vice president and Chairman 
of the Convocation of Wilmington. The Bus- 
iness session which will be very brief, will be 
followed by a very interesting program. 

Theme for the meeting will be "The Youth 
Week-end of the General Convention" which was 
held in Kansas City, Missouri last month. There 
will be talks by those who attended this meeting 
and discussion of the problems presented there. 

Bishop Thomas C. Darst, members of the Cler- 
gy and Executive Committee, and leaguers 
from throughout the Diocese will be present. 

Executive Committee members are urged to 
be there at 3:00 for a committee meeting at 
that time. 

All leaguers are requested to bring box sup- 
pers and to be there on time. 



A LETTER FOR YA' 



Dear Leaguers: 

Well folks, how's everything? Are you working 
hard? From all I hear we've really got some up 
and coming leagues this year— and they're having 
lots of fun with all the work too. Work is fun, 
you know, if you want it to be. 

Saw a lot of old Leaguers this week-end. And 
did I get some news. Harold Wesley, that ladies' 
man from down Washington way, says every- 
thing is fine. Don't know whether he meant the 
League or the ladies. Confidentially he doesn't 
go to Greenville any more. And Greenville brings 
us to Margaret Jones. She and Anne Kyle, Fay- 
etteville's gift to the "gabbers," are keeping up a 
lively correspondence — almost as lively as their 
conversation. 

And then there's Johnny Osteen, you remember 
Johnny. The little man from Kinston who really 
knows how to make a piano sit up and play. That 
is of course if it's an upright. Johnny's looking 
fine and says he's already started planning for 
Camp Leach next summer. 

East Carolina isn't doing so bad when it comes 
to campers. There's Joyce Dunham, Bessie Fay 
Hunt, "Shorty" Sutherland, Hampton Noe, Aline 
Purser, Betsy Noe, Camille Gaskins, and its re- 
cently acquired John Armfield. He seems to be 
on the campus all the time. His only comment 



was, "the pastoral side of this work is very inter- 
esting." 

Met the president of the Goldsboro League the 
other day and — my, my — do I feel sorry for him 
when he gets to camp. Please, girls, when you 
see him don't rust him to death — after all — well, 
after all. 

Henry Stenhouse was along. I think he's 
changed. He wasn't half as quiet as usual. Maybe 
it was camp. 

Hampton Noe had a birthday November 4. "Ma" 
Noe came to see him, and was he happy when he 
saw her? Weren't we all, though ? 

Well, guess that's all the gossip that's printa- 
ble, but there'll be more later. So till then it's so 
long, and God bless you all. 

MARY. 



ST. PAUL'S, WILMINGTON 



Having all three of the Millers, "Ma," "Pa," 
Dot Reed, with us, we, at St. Paul's, are looking 
forward to a very successful year. We have as 
our officers the following : 

President, Grace Sloan; Vice President, Mac 
Wilson; Secretary, Jane Dunham; Treasurer 
Alan Blake; Thank Offering Secretary, Louise 
Warner; Publicity Managers, Florence Davis, Joe 
Howe and Bobby Smith. 

Attendance so far this year has passed last 
year's average by a wide margin. We have had 
excellent meetings and everyone seems enthusias- 
tic about the work we are trying to do. At the 
first meeting officers were named and the league 
organization was explained by Rev. Mr. Miller. 
Hampton Noe, our Diocesan President, was pres- 
ent and gave us a short talk on the Diocesan and 
Provincial organizations, and told of the aims that 
have been set up for this year. 

Our meetings have consisted of a "Take It or 
Leave It" program, and the reading of the first 
fall edition of the "Searchlight". We had a Cor- 
porate Communion on October 6, and thirty-eight 
young people were in attendance. We are already 
planning a cake sale for the purpose of raising 
our various dues, and we have an idea that the 
other leagues in the Diocese will have to go some 
to Veep up with us this year. 

We extend to each league our best wishes for a 
successful year, and we wish to commend all of 
you on your first articles in the "Searchlight". 

Hoping to see each and every one of you soon, 
we await the next edition to hear of your prog- 
ress. 

BOBBY SMITH, Publicity Manager. 



NOVEMBER, 1940 



11 



ST. PETER'S, WASHINGTON 



The League at St. Peter's has turned over a 
new leaf. With a new Counselor, new officers, 
and new ideas, we are full of plans for our year's 
work. 

Our first problem was to get interesting pro- 
grams; that problem is helping itself, as our in- 
terest increases. 

We are quite proud of our selection of officers. 
They are: 

President, Harold Wesley ; Vice President, Har- 
ry Walker, Jr. ; Secretary, Estelle Russ ; Treasur- 
er, Caroline Morton; Thank Offering Secretary, 
Sally Bogart; Publicity Chairman, Alma Rob- 
bins; Counsellor, Mr. Shaw Bonner. 

May all Leagues feel as we do, that this is our 
best year ever, is our sincerest wish. 

ALMA ROBBINS. 



ST. JOHN'S, FAYETTEVILLE 



During the summer months, St. John's Young 
People's Service League has been holding its reg- 
ular Sunday evening meetings and carrying on its 
fine work. On the fourth Sunday in June, the 
League sponsored the Sunday morning service at 
the Confederate Women's Home, at which time, 
Father Webber-Thompson made a talk. Leaguers 
contributed individually to a scholarship for an 
underprivileged boy, which enabled him to attend 
the Y. M. C. A. Camp at White Lake. Clothes 
were contributed by the League to a box sent by 
the Woman's Auxiliary to Calabash Mission. 
Supper for the August meeting of the Men's Club 
was prepared and served by the League. On the 
last Friday in August a party was given for the 
associate and new members of the league. Danc- 
ing, games, and refreshments were enjoyed by all. 
The party was held in the Y. P. S. L. Hut which 
was erected recently by the Men's Club for the 
young people of the church. 

St. John's League began the new year with an 
enrollment of forty members. The officers elect- 
ed for the next six months were: Belle Ray Til- 
linghast, President; Mary Burns, Vice-President; 
Peggy Nimocks, Secretary ; Weldon Jordan, Treas- 
urer, Norwood Tillinghast, Thank Offering Sec- 
retary. At a very impressive Installation Service, 
conducted by Rev. W. Tate Young, in the Parish 
House Chapel, these new officers were installed on 
September 22. Following the Installation Service, 
reports were made by the delegates who attended 
the Conference on Young People's work held at 
Camp Leach last month, and Mr. Young gave 
some interesting pointers on League work. At the 
last meeting, a fellowship supper was given by the 



four counsellors, Mrs. W. N. Tillinghast, Miss Isa- 
bel Tillinghast, Mr. E. 0. Rehm and Mr. Ed. Metz. 
After the supper, the membership was divided into 
four groups, carrying out the Sewanee Plan of 
Group Rotation, each group being advised by one 
of the four counsellors. Extensive plans were 
made by these groups for fine services, interest- 
ing programs, impressive worship services and 
socials. St. John's League is looking forward to 
a very inspiring year of fine work. 

MARGARET REHM, Diocesan Representative 



CHRIST CHURCH, ELIZABETH CITY 



Our first meeting of the Y. P. S. L. this year 
was on September 29. The following officers were 
elected: President, Betty Gaither; Vice Presi- 
dent, Lucille Williams; Secretary, Betty Griffin; 
Treasurer, Bill Dawson ; Publicity Chairman, Car- 
olyn Hill ; Diocesan Representative, Morgia Worth 
Garrett ; Thank Offering Secretary, Virginia Wil- 
son; Pianists, Audrey Dawson and Lucille Wil- 
liams. 

We will hold an Installation Servce for the new 
officers on Sunday November 3rd, at the morning 
service. 

We began this year with a total of twenty-three 
members. We have made quite a lot of money 
with which we plan to pay our diocesan dues. 

We are looking forward to our annual Hallowe'en 
Frolic at which everyone has a grand time and 
the League realizes a good sum of money. 

Everyone comes to the large auditorium of the 
Parish House where booths are set up — some 
selling candy, some drinks, and others hot dogs. 

The "Grab Bag" is usually the most popular 
booth, with "Buy a sucker for a chance on the 
doll" running a close second. 

Shooting down bags of peanuts, tossing pen- 
nies in a cup and the "spook house" are all lots of 
fun. 

The boys and girls parade in their costumes to 
see who will win the prize for the best costume. 
After tnis is done, the frolic ends with a dance, 
that everyone enjoys. We wish you could come to 
one of these frolics sometime and enjoy the fun 
with us. 

Our League not only participates in things 
for fun, but in serious things as well, of which you 
will hear more later. At the present we are plan- 
ning a drive to get subscriptions to the Mission 
Herald. 

We are proud of our Y. P. S. L. and we hope 
that each League in the diocese is as happy in its 
v/or^, as we are in our^. 

Respectfully submitted, 
CAROLYN HILL, Publicity Chairman. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ST. THOMAS', AHOSKIE 



The League of St. Thomas', Ahoskie, believes in 
giving its members a first-hand view of the var- 
ious points of interest in the Diocese. A few 
weeks ago we went down to see Camp Leach and 
historic St. Thomas' Church, Bath. Those of our 
number who had not seen Camp Leach were very 
much impressed, particularly by the stone altar 
and the outdoor chapel. Previously we had vis- 
ited old St. David's Church, Creswell, and the 
Good Shepherd Hospital in New Bern. We are 
hoping to make another inspection trip soon. Last 
year our travels carried us as far as Washington, 
D. C, where we attended Mass at St. Agnes, 
Church and Evening Prayer at the National Ca- 
thedral. 

OSCAR P. SPEED, Publicity Chairman. 



ST. ANDREW'S, WRIGHTSVILLE 



We're sorry to have delayed in sending in the 
names of our offcers for this year, but we were 
rather late in getting reorganized. The following 
leaders were chosen at our election last week: 

President, Madelyn Stone; Vice President, Es- 
telle Stokley; Secretary, Athalia Griffith; Treas- 
urer, Wesley Huggins. 

We have a grand League this year, about thir- 
ty active members, and we hope to make a big 
success of it. 

Best wishes for you and your League. 

JACKIE ROGERS, Publicity Chairman 



ST. JAMES', WILMINGTON 



The Young Peoples' Service League of St. 
James', Wilmington held its first meeting on 
September 28. The officers elected for this year 
are: President, Agnes Morton; Vice Presidents, 
Mortimer Glover and Nancy Morton; Secretary, 
Gibbs Holmes; Treasurer, Jim Lynch; and Pub- 
licity Chairman, May Howes. 

At the other meetings we have had, interesting 
programs have been presented and we discussed 
our future plans and projects. It was decided 
to have a supper meeting once a month, which we 
are sure will bring all the members together. It 
was suggested to adopt the mission at Calabash 
for our project this year as we enjoyed it so much 
last year. 

Since so many of our old members have gone 
off to school, our Service League isn't quite as 
large as last year ; but we hope to have new mem- 
bers to take their places. 

So far I can say that our League has been a big 
success.. 

MAY HOWES, Publicity Chairman. 



MEMORIAL TO DR. C. J. SAWYER 

DEDICATED AT ST. THOMAS', 

WINDSOR, N. C. 



At the eleven o'clock service at St. Thomas', 
Windsor, on the 22nd Sunday after Trinity, a 
handsome silver Ciborium was dedicated to the 
glory of God in loving memory of Charles Judson 
Sawyer, M. D. It is the gift of a devoted friend 
of the family and a devout church woman, Mrs. 
James G. Staton, of Williamston. 

Dr. Sawyer was an outstanding citizen of Ber- 
tie County, and had been a Vestryman of St. 
Thomas' Church for a number of years. He was 
frequently seen at the Diocesan Conventions. 
His genial smile and friendly handshake re- 
flecting the beautiful spirit which dwelt within, 
will be remembered long by many. 

In his brief dedicatory remarks the Rev. Mr. 
Schenck, Rector of St. Thomas', cited the words 
on the tomb of Sir Christopher Wrenn in old St. 
Paul's, London. "If you seek his monument, look 
about you." He said in part that the same words 
might be written of Dr. Sawyer, for the restora- 
tion of this beautiful old church, the funds for 
which were raised by him, were a monument to his 
loyalty and faithfulness to his church ; the memor- 
ial itself, the gift of a friend, was a monument to 
his capacity for making friends, and keeping them ; 
the many men and women, young and old, whose 
eyes had been opened that they might see, others 
whose ears had been unstopped that they might 
hear, and those whose throats had been healed 
were monuments to his service to his fellowman 
through his profession, and that his family which 
reflected his radiance was a monument to his 
trusting faith in Jesus Christ. 

The old church was filled with a host of his 
friends, his family and communicants. Under 
the direction of his widow, who was at the organ, 
the choir rendered beautiful and appropriate 
music. Stainer's "What Are These That Are 
Arrayed in White Robes" was sung as the offer- 
tory anthem. 

Among the family present for the dedication 
were his daughters, Mrs. William Pierce of Wel- 
don and Miss Sarah Pearson Sawyer, who is a 
student at the University of North Carolina, and 
Mr. Charles J. Sawyer, his son, of Windsor. One 
son, James Sawyer, of New York, was unable to 
attend. 

Dr. Sawyer died suddenly at his son's cottage 
at Eden House Beach on the Chowan River, July 
28th, 1940. May he rest in peace. 



NOVEMBER, 1940 



13 



MAN MEETS GOD'S POWER 



By Rev. Jack R. Rountree 

(Continued from October issue) 

Never can we hope to escape the Cross. Always 
there is some Calvary upon which the evil in 
the world is crucifying Him afresh. And we 
must ascend it with Him. In a world at war, we 
see Him hanging there anew, with blood flow- 
ing from His head, His hands, His feet. We hear 
His cry, "Father, forgive them, they know not 
what they do". In calamities and tragedies, down 
where men suffer, there He suffers too. 

We too must meet these crosses. These many 
crosses on the Calvaries that open the way to 
Love's eternal victory. And through the cross, 
there comes the resurrection of our dead selves 
to live in the power of God for higher things. 

Characteristic of the lives of those first Chris- 
tians was their love for each other. A love born 
of their iove of God. To them Jesus was the love 
of God incarnate, and drew them to love Him 
with all their heart and soul and mind. And be- 
cause they loved Him, they experienced a new 
sense of their own importance to God — He cared 
for them ; it gives a new dignity to a man, but a 
dignity that is humble and conscious of its need 
of Him. But when love shines into the heart, it 
is such a brilliant light that it shines through and 
we love our neighbors too. It is inescapeable. 
That's the way love works. It is the gift of the 
Spirit to man. Just read 1 Corinthians XII-XIV-1 ; 
the explanation of love is there. 

It was this love of God that makes all the dif- 
ference in our lives, as it did in theirs. It isn't 
something that we have; it is something given. 
And this makes the difference between the man 
who stands upon his own worth, and the man who 
opens his heart so completely to God that God can 
work a miracle in his heart. Dodd says that "when 
Paul could do nothing, God did everything for him, 
and all that was left was for him to give thanks" 
— the thanksgiving of a life devoted in childlike 
trust to God and His will. 

We Christians should believe all this. We have 
had innumerable opportunities to try it out in our 
own lives. We have learned this much, that when 
we have forgotten self and trusted Him completely 
some strange power has possessed us and made 
it possible for God to work through us. There 
have been times when we have been vouchsafed 
an insight into truth that has brought a holy awe 
and beauty into our lives. We have confronted 
temptation and been empowered by Him to resist 
evil. We have been bruised and beaten by life 
and found Him so sustaining us that we are not 
crushed by the blows. We have seen Him speak 



words of love through the faces of some whom we 
have been able to "help along the way". There 
have been moments when through His spirit we 
have experienced peace and joy and happiness. 

Of late we have beheld the whole world — the 
so-called Christian world brought into the mael- 
strom of war. Christians fighting Christians. Our 
own security has been threatened and we are dis- 
tressed. Fears and anxieties weigh us down and 
cripple our powers. Doubts arise and we ques- 
tion our own convictions. Our sense of "ought" 
runs counter to the things we desire and want 
for ourselves. It isn't a beautiful picture, but 
one of dark, grim tragedy. 

But it is times like these that call for "that 
something more" for the Christian. The arm of 
the Lord is not shortened that He cannot hear, 
nor is His ear deaf that He cannot hear our 
cries". Today we need to heed the call, "Return 
unto Me and I will return unto you," saith the 
Lord. We hear this need proclaimed by advo- 
cates of moral rearmament, leading economists, 
political leaders and others throughout the United 
States. But most of all, we feel the need within 
our own hearts. 

May we suggest four things urgently necessary 
for you and me today, if we would recover that 
lost radiance of the Gospel and such a renewal 
of Divine power that we can again face life with 
clear and steady eyes. Their elaboration we shall 
discuss in the next issue of the Mission Herald: 

First: We need to withdraw constantly from 
the strains and stresses of every day and sit 
calmly before the Lord. This should be a period 
in which we read the word of God, prayerfully, 
expectantly, and in all humility. Let the "Spirit 
Himself bear witness to our spirits" that we are 
indeed God's children. 

Second: Face the reality of our need, of our- 
selves as we really are. Think over our defects 
and wrongs which we have done. Make due con- 
fession of these to Him, knowing that "if we con- 
fess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us 
our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteous- 
ness". This should be a sincere, honest facing of 
the facts — not dodging any of them — and making 
confession of them to Him. 

Third: Literally thrust ourselves upon Him, 
for He careth for us. Make here the absolute sur- 
render of our wills to His will. "Not my will but 
Thy will, Lord, be done". 

Fourth: Commit our way unto Him. Make 
His cause our cause. Leave the place of Com- 
munion, the place where we have received strength 
to go forth and "live worthy of Him". 

These are the first steps in the renewal of pow- 
er for the good life. They will be elaborated in a 
later article. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



PRESENTATION OF THE UNITED THANK 
OFFERING 



By Mrs. Frank F. Fagan, Diocesan Custodian 

It was a custom of the ancient church for peo- 
ple coming to the Eucharist, the service of thanks- 
giving, to bring their own offerings of bread 
and wine to be used on the altar. This gift 
symbolized their own toil and sacrifice, wine 
grown from their own grapes, bread of their 
own grain grinding. "Themselves, their souls 
and bodies," they offered thus in a literal sense. 

In the same spirit the thousands of women 
representing other tens of thousands, who poured 
into the great arena of the Municipal Auditorium 
in Kansas City for the Corporate Communion 
of the women of the Church, and the presenta- 
tion of the United Thank Offering, did not come 
with empty hands. Through their representa- 
tives, the United Thank Offering custodians of 
the dioceses and missionary districts of the whole 
Church who were seated in the center section of 
the arena, they brought with them three years of 
thankful prayers physically expressed in the 
checks carried by the diocesan custodians. While 
5,000 persons, mostly women, knelt in prayer, 
there was a consciousness of other women 
throughout the nation uniting with us in similar 
services in country missions and city churches. 

A 100-voice woman's choir led the procession 
singing "Crown Him with Many Crowns". Then 
followed the twenty-five missionary Bishops pre- 
ceding the celebrant, the Rt. Rev. Henry St. George 
Tucker. The Epistle was read by the Rt. Rev. 
Leopold Kroll, Bishop of Liberia; the gospel by 
the Most. Rev. D. T. Owen, Archbishop of To- 
ronto and Primate of all Canada. Among others 
assisting were Bishop Rowe of Alaska, Bishop 
Beecher of Western Nebraska, and Bishop Hunt- 
ington, now retiring after forty-five years in 
China. At the Offertory as the Diocesan Custod- 
ians went forward to place the certificates of their 
three years' in-gathering in the great alms basin 
of gold held by the Rev. Richard M. Trelease, Rec- 
tor of St. Paul's Church, Kansas City, the United 
Thank Offering hymn was sung, "Holy Offerings, 
Rich and Rare". The music made a back- 
ground of praise as 80 girls, dressed in white with 
Madonna blue veils, took up the offering from the 
congregation. This offering was received by 
Bishop Spencer, of West Missouri, host of the 
Convention, and the Very Rev. Claude W. Sprouse, 
Dean of Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kan- 
sas City. The Presiding Bishop then received 
the entire offering at the high altar. 

The golden alms basin used fifty years ago to 



receive the first United Thank Offering of $2,- 
188.00, has since received a total of about seven 
and a half million dollars. The offering, second 
largest in the Church's history, goes to women 
missionaries of the Church here and abroad. 
Training, equipment, support, and retirement al- 
lowances are provided; missions are built, and 
free church training centers are maintained from 
the fund. 

Following the presentation of the offerings, 
more than 4,000 women moved slowly toward 
the altar where Bishop Tucker and the twenty- 
five assisting missionary Bishops administered 
the Holy Communion. The great service lasted 
two hours and closed on a hopeful and forward 
looking note with processional hymn, "Lead On O 
King Eternal." 

At the mass meeting the night of October the 
10th, as we waited to hear the total amount of 
our offering presented that morning, we watched 
moving pictures of the Domestic and Foreign 
Missionary Fields. The little army of mission- 
ary workers marched out behind their flag to be 
followed by scenes on the screen and workers in 
the flesh from the missionary stations of the 
Church. There were (with the flood lights on 
them for only a moment) the people who are 
fighting the pagan fire, and behind them in the 
shadow were the fields where they labor and the 
others who could not be there. There, moving on 
the screen, were the slums, the factories, the hos- 
pitals, settlements, jails, schools and churches, 
while across the stage behind their flags marched 
the missionaries to the White, Negro, Oriental, 
refugee, and downcast people in the United States, 
Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, the Canal Zone, Haiti, Puer- 
to Rico, Dominician Republic, Liberia, the Phil- 
ippine Islands, China, India, Missions of the 
Church of England and Alaska. 

Then the picture showed the United Thank 
Offering being gathered up in the golden alms 
basin and taken by armored car to the vaults of 
the bank where Dr. Lewis B. Franklin, Treasurer 
of the National Council and his assistant, Mr. 
Whitney, counted the huge amount. Jumbled fig- 
ures danced maddeningly around the screen, up- 
side down and round about. The figures then 
took shape, beginning with the last. First seven- 
ty cents, then nine, eight, zero, four, seven, nine 
—$974,089.70. 

The mighty throng stood singing "Praise God 
From Whom All Blessings Flow". With interest 
added the amount was over one million dollars. 
This United Thank O.Tering represents thousands 
of women who are praying, working and giving 
for the extension of Christian work throughout 
the world- 



NOVEMBER, 1940 



15 



(Continued from Page 9) 
opportunity to hear the Bishop and extend friendly 
greetings after the service. 

We were greatly disappointed that a pair of 
brass Eucharistic candlesticks the gift of Mrs. 
Susan Shaw, a prayer desk, and a Bishop's Chair, 
gifts of the Woman's Auxiliary, all of which the 
Bishop came prepared to dedicate, failed to arrive. 
Bishop Darst has promised to return to us for the 
Dedication however, as soon as possible, after 
they do arrive. 

We had a sale of aprons, which due to the ener- 
gy of two or three of the ladies, was a huge suc- 
cess and we are planning to serve dinner to the 
order of Ruritans at their November meeting. 

The rector, Rev. John S. Armfield, has accepted 
a call to Greenville, N. C. We greatly regret his 
leaving us, but we realize it is a call to greater 
service for him. Our prayers for God's blessing 
upon him and his work will go with him. 
SYBIL C. HAWKS 

Publicity Chairman 



MEETINGS THIS MONTH 



November 19th, Meeting of the Convocation of 
Wilmington, St. Paul's Beaufort, 10:00 A. M. 

November 19th, Meeting of Laymen of Dis- 
tricts 1 to 9 inclusive, St. Paul's, Greenville, 5:00 
to 9:00 P.M. 

November 20th, Meeting of Convocation of 
Edenton, St. James', Ayden, 10:00 A. M. 

November 24th, Meeting of both Convocations 
of the Young People's Service League of the Dio- 
cese, St. Mary's, Kinston, 4:00 P. M. 

November 26th, Meeting of Laymen, Districts 
10, 11 and 12, St. Paul's, Clinton, 5:00 to 9:00 
P.M. 

(Both meetings of the Laymen will be supper 
meetings.) 

The Clergy had their Conference in St. Mary's, 
Kinston, November 4th, at which time the Pro- 
grams of the Departments of Evangelism and 
Promotion were presented and approved. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 
GENERAL CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1. 1940 TO DECEMBER 31, 1940 
CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



Paid to 
Nov. 11, 

1340 
Parishes , 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $ IP^oo 

Clinton, St. Paul's 150.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 1,213.28 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 741.20 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 04.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 650.00 

Lumberion, Trinity 58.57 

New Bern, Christ Church 1,518.84 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 35.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocenis' 45.80 

Southport, St. Philip's 163.85 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 34.40 

Whiteville, Grace Church 45.07 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 244.71 

Wilmington, St. James' 7,482.32 

Wilnvngton, St. John's 1,859.37 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 572.35 



Oraanized Missions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Campbellton, St. Philip-Apostle 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

'> *v e s! AH c 'o-il's 

Pikeville, St. George's ... 

Trenton, Grace Church, 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 



Paid to 

Nov. 11, 

1940 

17.60 

40.00 

30.00 

5.00 

'. 25.00 

10.00 
25.0b 



Unorganized Missions 

Calabash, St. Andrew's 

Polloksville, Mission 

Tar Landing, Mission 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd ... 



14.92 
5.00 
6.71 

55.00 



Total $15,277.99 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 27.31 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 7-85 

Belhaven, St. James' 79.88 

Bonnerton, St. John's 18.14 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Columbia, bt. Andrew's 36.25 

Creswell, St. David's 25.02 

Edenton, St. Paul's 900.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 879.98 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's '7.81 

Greenville, St. Paul's 777.00 

Grifton, St. John's 53.61 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 20.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 300.00 

Jessama, Zion 106.72 

Lake Landing, St. George's 15.4f 

Plymouth, Grace Church 175.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 33.80 

Washington, St. Peter's 1,643.83 

Williamston, Advent 150.50 



Windsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's ... 



Unorganized M : ssions 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 



Parochial Missions 

Creswell, Galilee Mission 



200.00 

17.79 

200.00 



32.98 



54.45 
31.00 



20.00 

in. oo 

145.00 

40.00 



17.00 



Total $ 6,056.37 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's. 



13.83 

131.00 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 115.00 

Oraanized Missions 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 

Edenton, St. John the Evangel.st 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Washington, St. Paul's 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 

Unorgtnized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Farmville, St. Timothy's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X-Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, Brooklyn Mission 



18.0? 
90.00 
16.03 
35.00 
50.00 
20.00 



5.22 
18.50 

5.0' 
10.00 
JC1.00 
12.90 



Total % 557.50 

Grand Total $21,891.86 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 

RECTOR 






— *» 

II!—* 



THEY ARE ON SALE IN YOUR PARISH 

LARGE, ATTRACTIVE BOOKLETS 

Printed For the 

SILVER JUBILEE OF BISHOP DARST 

Entitled 

"BISHOP DARST AND EAST CAROLINA 

DURING THE PAST TWENTY-FIVE YEARS" 

Price 35 cents 



THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 

of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 

Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 

Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 

Wilmington, N. C. 



I 

I , , — „ — , — ,„ — , 






INVESTMENTS ! 



We are at all times ready to assist the ixi- 

i vestors in North Carolina in the purchase or I 

sale of any type security. 



I 



We specialize in : 

NO^TH CAROLINA 

STATE, COUNTY AND CITY BONDS 

Local Preferred and Common Stocks 

Please communicate with us if we can be of 
service to you 



Oscar Burnstt and Company 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Thomas C. Darst, Jr. Lloyd E. Canady 



|< — 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and U. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



i 



THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of East Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
Wilmington, N. C. 



McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 

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Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 88 12th & Market Sts. 

Wilmington, N. C. 



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INSURANCE 

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Wilmington, N. C. 

Phone 84 



4»- 



. , „ :,_„. * 

,,„ 4. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter 
continue her education in a Church school. 

MRS. ERNEST CRUTKSHANK, A. M. 

Presictent 

Saint Mary's offers the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades 
of High S"hool and' 2 years College work. All acade- 
mic courses fully accredited by Southern Association. 
General charge $700 including m i ion in Art, Expres- 
sion, Home Economics, Music. 

Gym and Field sports, Horseback Riding, Golf, 
Tennis, 20 acre campus and Indoor Tiled Pool. 

Catalogue and Book of Views 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



DEC 1 6 1940 

Jan 41 

Library, U. N. C. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



S ** K C 



ROOiVf 



/ 



VOLUME LIV 



DECEMBER, 1940 



NUMBER 10 




nlfralU 




ORIENTAL CHILDREN ENACT CHRISTMAS STORY 

Varied racial strains join in Nativity observance at 

Episcopal Mission in Honolulu. Similar 

pageants take place in many mission 

institutions all around the world. 



"^Cs ^^ "*?"S; "S^Ss >^Sk -^-Ss /•C^'Cs ,3>^ ^^ ,3>^ ^t^ ^^k ^€S^ ^e-K 

^s <tn ^ f ^ ffi ^ ^ ^ PJ^r ^ ^ ^ Pj^p ?^ 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Associate Editor 

REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE 

Kinston, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 



Obituaries and forma] resolutions, ons cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Oflice, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and 
new address. 



EVEKY MEMBER CANVASS REPORTS 



The Every Member Canvass Reports are be- 
ginning to come in, and show that the people are 
responding in a fine way. 

The first was from St. John's, Wilmington. 
The Canvass was carefully prepared for over a 
period of weeks and was conducted on one Sunday. 
Last year the Canvass was quite a success, enab- 
ling the parish to meet its budget requirements, 
and the one this year shows an increase over last 
year. Mr. McC. B. Wilson has been Canvass 
Chairman for several years. The Rev. E. W. 
Halleck is Rector of the parish. 

It is hoped that all the parishes and missions 
will send in their reports as soon as possible. 



REV. JOHN R. TOLAR IS SERVING ST. 

JAMES', AYDEN AND ST. BARNABAS', 

SNOW HILL, DURING ABSENCE 

OF THE RECTOR 



The Rev. John R. Tolar of Fayetteville is 
serving St. James', Ayden and St. Barnabas', 
Snow Hill during the absence of the Rector, Rev. 
Wm. H. R. Jackson. Mr. Jackson, who is a Chap- 
lain stationed at Fort Jackson, will be away for a 
year. 

Mr. Toiar also serves St. Philip's, Campbellton, 
(Fayetteville). 



TABLET ERECTED TO THE MEMORY OF 

THE LATE REV. R. B. DRANE, D. D., WILL 

BE UNVEILED IN ST. PAUL'S, EDENTON 



On Monday evening, December 16th, in St. 
Paul's, Edenton, there will be unveiled a tablet 
erected by the vestry to the memory of the late 
Rov. Robert Brent Drane, D. D., for many years 
rector of the parish. 

Bishop Darst will be present and make an ad- 
dress on the life and work of Dr. Drane. 

Bishop Penick of the Diocese of North Carolina 
and Bishop Juhan of the Diocese of Florida are 
expected to attend. 

The rector of the parish, the Rev. Charles A. 
Ashby, has asked us to extend an invitation to the 
people oi the Diocese to be present at this service. 



MEETINGS FOR LAYMEN WELL ATTENDED 



The laymen of the Diocese are showing un- 
usual interest in the annual meetings that are 
held for them. The meetings held in November 
at Greenville and Clinton were attended by lay- 
men from all parts of the Diocese, and it was 
the decision of these laymen that the meetings 
should be continued. One layman suggested 
that they be held several times a year, if possible. 

At these meetings the Diocesan and General 
Church work were given careful consideration. 

At both meetings a resolution of Mr. W. G. 
Gaither of Elizabeth City, which had been ap- 
proved by the Executive Council, was enthusi- 
astically approved. The resolution provides for 
a Layman's Offering, the details to be worked out 
by a committee that has been appointed by the 
Bishop. 



REV. WALTER R. NOE SERVING CHURCHES 
IN PENDER COUNTY 



When the Rev. J. Leon Malone took charge of 
the work along the Inland Waterway, he had to be 
relieved of the work at St. Mary's, Burgaw and 
other places. Services are now being held at 
Burgaw by Mr. Noe. 

Mr. Noe has also been asked to have services 
at St. Thomas', Atkinson. 

Services at Atkinson were discontinued several 
years ago, but there seems now a desire for a reg- 
ular schedule of services. There is a very attrac- 
tive church building at Atkinson and a number 
of communicants of our Church, who might once 
more become active and interested. 



, 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME LIV 



WILMINGTON, N. C, DECEMBER, 1940 



NUMBER 10 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



As I did not write a letter for the November 
issue of the Mission Herald, I shall now give a 
report of my activities since my return from our 
wonderful General Convention in Kansas City. 

While in Kansas City I received the sad news 
of the death of my dear friend the Rev. John 
Benners Gibble and was very sorry that I could 
not be home for the funeral service of this beloved 
clergyman. He was truly consecrated to his min- 
istry and service as Priest, Pastor and friend, 
and he will be sadly missed by that great company 
of people who knew and loved him. "May he 
rest in peace, and may light perpetual shine 
upon him." 

On Sunday, October the twenty-seventh, I 
preached and celebrated Holy Communion in St. 
John's Church Winton, at 11 :00 A. M. 

In the afternoon, I preached, and assisted by 
a goodly number of the clergy, consecrated the 
beautiful new St. Peter's Church, Sunbury, and 
dedicated certain memorials. 

In the evening I preached in St. Mary's Church, 
Gatesville. 

On Friday, November the first — All Saints' 
Day — at 7:30 P. M. I preached and confirmed four 
persons presented by the Rev. Wood Gaither in 
St. George's Church, Lake Landing. 

On Saturday afternoon, the second, I preached 
in ^11 Saints' Church, Fairfield. 

Sunday the third, was another busy, happy day. 
In the morning I preached and confirmed two 
persons in Christ Church, Creswell. In the after- 
noon I preached and confirmed one person in 
Galilee Mission, Lake Phelps, and at night I 
preached and confirmed three persons in St. 
Andrew's Church, Columbia. All of these classes 
were presented by the Rev. Wood Gaither. 

On Monday, the fourth, I attended and took 
part in the Clergy Retreat and Conference, in 
St. Mary's Church, Kinston. 

On Wednesday, the sixth, I had an interesting 
conference with the Presiding Bishop and Dr. 
Lewis B. Franklin at 281 Fourth Avenue, New 
York. 

On Thursday, the seventh, at 8:30 A. M., in the 
Chapel of the Convent of St. John Baptist, Rals- 
ton, N. J., I had the blessed privilege of taking 
part and making an address at the beautiful and 
solemn service in which sister Alice Madeline and 
Sister Catherine Veronica were received into the 
Community of St. John Baptist as professed Sis- 



ters. This helpful community of devoted, conse- 
crated women is under the auspices of the Episco- 
pal Church. Sister Alice Madeline is the daughter 
of Dr. and Mrs. John B. Cranmer of Wilmington. 

On Saturday morning, the ninth, I conducted 
the devotional exercises and made an address at 
the Annual meeting of the Methodist Conference 
in the Fifth Avenue Methodist Church, Wil- 
mington. 

Sunday the tenth, was indeed a blessed day. 
At 7:30 in the morning, assisted by the Rector, 
the Rev. Lewis F. Schenck, I began the Centen- 
nial Celebration by celebrating Holy Communion 
in St. Thomas' Church, Windsor. At 11 :00 A. M., 
I preached the Centennial Sermon and confirmed 
fourteen persons, presented by Mr. Schenck. It 
is interesting to note that this was the largest 
class ever presented in the one hundred years of 
the Church's life. Following the service a de- 
licious luncheon was served at "Windsor Castle" 
the gracious home of Judge and Mrs. Francis D. 
Winston, at which time I was presented with a 
very wonderful birthday cake, as I had the honor 
of sharing my birthday with that of St. Thomas' 
Church. At 2:30 in the afternoon an historical 
service was held in St. Thomas' Church at which 
a splendid historical address was made by Mr. 
Schenck. St. Thomas' has the unusual distinc- 
tion of having had only two Senior Wardens in 
one hundred years: Mr. L. S. Webb, who served 
for fifty five years, and the present Senior War- 
don, Mr. E. W. Gray, who has served for forty- 
five years. The parish has never been more vig- 
orous than it is today and is going forward splen- 
didly under its enthusiastic and able young Rec- 
tor, Rev. Lewis F. Schenck. 

We closed the busy, day with a service in Grace 
Church, Woodville at 7:00 P. M. at which time I 
pleached to another fine congregation. 

On Monday, the eleventh, Armistice Day, I 
had dinner with my good friends, Mr. and Mrs. 
D. Collin Barnes in Murfreesboro. On the night 
of the eleventh I preached in St. Mark's Church, 
Roxobel. 

Returning to Wilmington on the morning of 
the twelfth, I left that night by train for Alex- 
andria, Va.. where I attended a meeting of the 
Board of Trustees of the Virginia Theological 
Seminary on the thirteenth. 

On Thursday, the fourteenth, in the Bishop's 
House. Washington, D. C. I attended a conference 
with the Presiding Bishop and a group of Bishops 
from surrounding dioceses at which time plans 



THE MISSION HERALD 



for the Presiding Bishop's Ten Year Plan were 
discussed and formulated. 

On Sunday, the seventeenth, I addressed the 
fine Men's Bible Class of St. Paul's, Beaufort at 
10:00 A. M. and at 11:00 A. M. I preached and 
confirmed one person, presented by the Rev. E. C. 
McConnell. In the afternoon, I preached and con- 
firmed two persons presented by Mr. McConnell, 
in St. Clement's Church, Beaufort. In the even- 
ing I preached and confirmed six persons, pre- 
sented by the Rev. Oscar E. Holder, in St. Mark's 
Church, Wilmington. 

On Tuesday, the nineteenth, I attended the 
meeting of the Wilmington Convocation in St. 
Paul's, Beaufort, and at night the Laymen's 
Meeting in St. Paul's Parish House, Greenville. 

On Wednesday, the twentieth, I attended the 
meeting of the Convocation of Edenton in St. 
James', Ay den. All three of these meetings were 
unusually inspiring and helpful. 

On Friday night, the twenty-second, I had 
the great privilege of attending the annual parish 
dinner in Christ Church Parish House, New Bern, 
and joining in the tributes to my dear friend, Mr. 
Edward K. Bishop', whose fifty first anniversary 
as a vestryman of Christ Church, was being cele- 
brated. For his long and useful service to the 
Church in his parish, diocese, and world, we thank 
God. May he have many more years of blessed 
service in the Church which he loves so dearly. 

On Sunday, the twenty-fourth, at 11:00 A. M., 
I preached and confirmed eight persons, present- 
ed by the Rev. John C. Grainger, in St. Stephen's 
Church, Goldsboro, and was pleased to note so 
many signs of growth and development in that 
fine parish under the inspiring leadership of the 
able young Rector. In the afternoon I attended 
the joint meeting of the two Convocations of the 
Y. P. S. L. in St. Mary's Church, Kinston, and it 
was truly a great meeting — great in attendance, 
great in spirit and great in possibilities for future 
leadership in the diocese. In the evening I preach- 
ed to a splendid congregation and confirmed fif- 
teen persons presented by the Rev. E. F. Moseley 
in St. Mary's Church, Kinston. I also received 
two persons from the Eastern Orthodox Church. 

On Monday afternoon, I had the happy privi- 
lege of dedicating "Stone Hall", our attractive 
little parish house and worker's home at Cala- 
bash. This building was given by Mr. and Mrs. 
R. R. Stone of Wilmington in memory of Mr. 
Stone's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Henderson 
Stone, and we are so grateful to the?e kind friends 
for their generous and loving gift to our Calabash 
Mission. 

Following the dedication service, we had a 
service in St. Andrew's Mission at which time I 



made an address and confirmed six persons pre- 
sented by the Priest-in-charge, the Rev. J. Leon 
Malone. 

On Tuesday night, the twenty-sixth, I pre- 
sided at the Layman's meeting in the Community 
House, Clinton. More than fifty men from the 
southern part of the diocese were present and like 
the Greenville meeting, it was most inspiring and 
helpful. 

With the earnest prayer that the wonderful 
spirit of courage, confidence, and consecration 
so abundantly manifested in the meetings of 
the Laymen, the young people and the Convoca- 
tions may permeate the life of the entire diocese 
so that we may really go forward with Christ 
to Victory, 1 am, 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



ST. THOMAS' CHURCH, WINDSOR TO HAVE 
PIPE ORGAN FOR CHRISTMAS 



Through the generosity of the children of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. George Lewis Mardre and the 
untiring efforts of the members of the congrega- 
tion, St. Thomas' Parish in Windsor will have its 
first pipe organ for Christmas. This will be the 
only direct electric action pipe organ in Bertie 
County. The only pipe organ of any description 
in the county at the present time is the historic 
one at Grace Episcopal Church, Woodville. 

Mr. George Lewis Mardre, Jr., in behalf of the 
heirs of his father's estate, promised $1,000.00 
toward the purchase of the organ in memory of 
his parents upon the raising of the balance by the 
congregation. The balance has been subscribed 
and a part of it paid. The other pledges are pay- 
able the first week in December. Mr. Mardre's 
proposition was made less than thirty days ago. 

The organ is being built by C. E. Grant of 
Portsmouth. It is a two manual instrument with 
direct electric action and a set of chimes. It is 
indeed a beautiful instrument and will add great- 
ly to the quiet beauty of the services in this fine 
old church. 

The late Mr. Mardre was a faithful communi- 
cant of St. Thomas' Parish for many years, a 
vestryman, and a generous contributor. Mrs. 
Mardre was greatly beloved in the community and 
active in the women's work in the parish. The 
late Mr. Mardre's son and namesake succeeded 
his father on the vestry and his grandson,, who 
also bears his grandfather's and father's name, 
is faithful as an acolyte. The Rev. Mr. Schenck 
has been rector of the churches in Bertie County 
since June of this year. 






DECEMBER, 1940 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY NEWS 



By Mrs. Alwyn Darden, Publicity Chairman 



The two Church meetings just held in East 
Carolina are known as the Convocation of Wil- 
mington and the Convocation of Edenton, but to 
those of us who listened to the messages from the 
various delegates, we felt we were having an 
opportunity to get the spirit of the Triennial 
meeting. Erorn the President of the Convoca- 
tion of Wilmington, Mrs. Wm. Sutherland, we 
learned about the Unified Parish Program. 
"How can we be effective witnesses to Christ?" 
The answer, learn to work and share in the fam- 
ily life 01 the Church. We learn to be Christians 
by witnessing together. There is something for 
every man, woman and child to do. How can we 
expect to carry out the idea of brotherhood in the 
world, if we can not do it in our parish?" 

Mrs. Harry Walker, President of the Convoca- 
tion of Edenton called attention to the theme of 
the Triennial, "Witness to the Power of God." 
This idea applies in our family life, our prayer 
life and in our worship. She mentioned the call to 
study Unity, urged familiarity with plans from 
Triennial, and suggested tithing as the best plan 
for every Christian. In enumerating the excuses 
the average person gives for not taking an of- 
fice in the auxiliary, Mrs. Walker recommended 
"putting iirst things first". "If the world is ever 
to believs in the power of God, we Church mem- 
bers have to do our part." 

"This is a perilous time, not only God's people 
imperiled, but people who profess Christianity," 
declared Mrs. L. J. Poisson, president of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary. "Man's extremity is God's op- 
portunity." Because we are not at war does not 
mean we are God's favored ones. The Presiding 
Bishop has suggested a Ten Year Plan, and we 
are asked to cooperate in this Great Spiritual 
Movement, which is to re-dedicate our lives to 
Christ. The first thing to do is to meet God. It is 
only as our sinful bodies are cleansed by God that 
we can be effective Christians." Urging more 
responsibility in our duty to God, she made the 
comparison that a lukewarm Church member is 
like a cup of coffee in a gallon of water, insipid, 
ineffective. If God is to use us we must have a 
higher degree of Christian Unity, our service 
mast be world wide. "The days are evil, but God 
with our cooperation can redeem them." 

"There is need for vital faith today," declared 
Rev. J. R. Rountree in his address on Evangelism. 
Jesus called people who were willing to lose them- 
selves. If we love Jesus and believe life more 
worthwhile because of him, wouldn't Jesus mean 



more to us ? The hour has come for us to be 
real Christians. He suggested, First, give your- 
self to the Lord. Ye shall receive power to be 
witnesses of our Christianity, in our family life, 
in our amusements, in every walk of life. We 
must have a re-awakening, beginning with our- 
selves, in the house of God." 

From a visitor to the Triennial, Mrs. Paul Simp- 
son we caught the spirit of the General Conven- 
tion, felt ourselves watching the throngs of peo- 
ple, saw the long line of Bishops and lay delegates 
as they inarched in at the Opening Meeting. 

In our own diocese we have the Inland Water- 
way Missions. It was not only instructive, but 
interesting to hear Miss Elizabeth MacMurray 
tell of the work she is doing there. Stressing her 
thankfulness she enumerated the following 
things: thankful for the Lord leading her to the 
Mission, for answers to prayers about Mission, 
for Lord's guidance, for help Mission gets from 
women of this diocese, for library auxiliary wo- 
men have given, for friends of the Mission. She 
mentioned the inconvenience of getting to and 
from her work. When the committee met to 
decide what to do with the Convocation fund, it 
was unanimous, "Give it to Miss MacMurray for 
transportation". 

Enthusiasm radiated from another delegate to 
General Convention, Miss Hallie Townes, as she 
described the activities, discussions and addresses 
given for the Young People. The new plan in- 
cludes worship, service and action. 

Asking all Auxiliary women in the diocese to 
hold out their hands to get the light which the 
delegates brought back from General Convention, 
Mrs. Donald MacRae showed how we could be 
a witnes;; to God's Power, how and what part 
Christian Education plays. She stressed the 
joy of the work, and suggested not having the 
auxiliary program too set. "Every meeting was 
illumined with the feeling of worship, disci- 
pline and witnessing." 

Describing her contact with Mrs. Wade and 
other Supply Chairmen at the General Conven- 
tion, Mrs. John Hardy made the Supply Depart- 
ment stand out as a vital, part of our work. She 
asked us to change our idea of giving clothes to 
the department; from giving the worst to giving 
the best. She stated that the Rev. R. I. Johnson 
in his address at the Convention said the Good 
Shepherd Hospital in New Bern could not get a- 
\onp: without the Supply Department. 

The Children's Offerings, Lenten, Birthday and 
Little Helpers at General Convention were ably 
presented by Mrs. W. R. Noe. She gave a number 
of suggestions to be used in making these offer- 
ings more interesting to children. 



THE MISSION HERALii 



Mrs. Sidney Ward asked each parish Auxiliary 
to send the Mary Thomas Memorial Fund to her. 
She emphasized the importance of the Church 
Periodical Club, by saying that so frequently the 
magazines we send are the only ones the people 
get, especially in China and Japan. 

Everyone who heard our own United Thank 
Offering Custodian realized it was with a thank- 
ful heart that it had been her privilege to present 
the offering' of the women of East Carolina for 
the past Triennium. 

The chairman of the Field Department, Mrs. 
Cnarles Green, enthusiastcally presented her 
work. She said the Every Member Canvass was 
a call from the Presiding Bishop, and that the 
Woman's Auxiliary parish field chairman was a 
member of the parish Every Member Canvass 
Committee. Write to her for most any informa- 
tion. She can give it to you. 

Stating that spiritual water is essential to a 
spiritual life, Mrs. Picklesimer, Student Worker 
at Greenville, said that is why Holy Communion 
is the major part of the Student program. She 
told about the fellowship breakfast after Com- 
munion and other activities. 

Declaring that the Thanksgiving Offering is 
the main support of the Thompson Orphanage, 
Mrs. Sam Fowle, Social Relations Chairman, 
urged the women to learn more about the work 
at the orphanage and give more generously at 
the service on Thanksgiving Day. She stated 
that the Christian family life was stressed at the 
Triennial, then she asked, 'Are we witnessing to 
the Power of God in our family life?" 

Stating the fact that Church Publicity is the 
Voice of the Church, Mrs. Alwyn Darden traced 
the church family life from the parish to the 
National Church, stressing the idea of the world 
view point as well as the parish. She emphasized 
the importance of keeping a record of the sub- 
scribers to Church papers so that every church- 
man can have an opportunity to renew his sub- 
scription when it expires. 

The best was saved for the last. Our Bishop 
arose, walked to the front of the church, looked 
at some notes he had on an envelope, read aloud, 
"29 E. C. at K. C. Wonder what I mean by that ?" 
Even though every one had had a bountiful lunch 
and had heard many talks, all of which has a 
tendency to make one sleepy, the idea of the Bish- 
op being puzzled about anything created a live 
interest at once. He then stated proudly that 
"29 E. C. at K. C." meant 29 East Carolinians 
at Kansas City. Declaring his approval of aid for 
British Missions, he gave the reason why, stat- 
ing that the work at Edenton, Bath, Brunswick 
and several other places in North Carolina was 
begun through the organization of the Mother 



Church, the Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel. Fifteen hundred dollars is our share in 
East Carolina. 

The Presiding Bishop's plan is God's call to 
Victory through Christ. Bishop Darst discussed 
the Ten Year Plan for East Carolina. It will in- 
clude personal visits to lapsed communicants. He 
hopes on Whit Sunday there will be a Great In- 
Gathering of East Carolina Churchmen, a re- 
dedication of the Church to its Mission. 

The Bishop urged the people to respond to the 
call of God, not to the call of the Presiding 
Bishop, or the Bishop of East Carolina. He stated 
that the people have gotten off on a detour, off 
the road that leads to the Cross. He asked every 
one to re-discover Christ's way of living. 



FRIENDLY HALL NOTES 



By Joyce Dunham, Publicity Chairman 





The Student Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary 
at Friendly Hall, Greenville, North Carolina, 
which is made up of students of East Carolina 
Teachers' College, has held two regular meetings 
this year. Their regular time of meeting is the 
second Monday of each month from five thirty 
until seven thirty. There is a real feeling of close 
fellowship as the girls enjoy a delicious dinner 
together and devote the remainder of their time 
to a business meeting and a deeper understand- 
ing of the work of the auxiliary. 

The first meeting was spent in hearing short 
explanations from the officers and committee 
heads as to their duties and the nature of the 
work they expect to do. The second meeting, 
which was held November 11, was a great suc- 
cess and an increasing interest in the Auxiliary 
was shown in the large number of students pre- 
sent. The highlights of the meeting were the 
very interesting and inspiring report of the stu- 
dent week-end World Conference at Kansas City 
by Frances Sutherland, the introduction of St. 
Paul's new rector, Mr. John Armfield, and the 
preparation for the Christmas party of December 
ninth. 



DECEMBER, 1940 



1 



BISHOP DARST DEDICATES SUNBURY 
CHURCH; MANY AT SERVICE 



Brick Chapel Is Built to Replace the One 
Blown Down 



By Audrea Rowell 

More than a hundred members of Churches in 
neighboring parishes were present Sunday after- 
noon, October 27th, at the dedication of the new 
St. Peter's Church at Sunbury by Bishop Thomas 
C. Darst. 

The little brick church, replacing the wooden 
one blown down by a tornado a year ago, was so 
crowded that supplementary seats had to be 
placed in the aisles to accommodate the congre- 
gation. 

In his opening remarks, Bishop Darst paid tri- 
bute to the people who, when there was little hope 
of restoring anything to take the place of the 
former church, built a church that now stands 
as a message to God. 

"From the beginning of time," Bishop Darst 
said, "men have wanted a place where they could 
meet God. And it is indeed a tribute to you, in 
this period when in other parts of the world, 
churches are being smashed and crumpled under 
the might of hate and selfishness, that your spirit 
and hope have survived to build a more lasting 
and permanent church. 

"But there is something bigger than buildings," 
Bishop Darst declared, "and that is people with 
souls, aspirations, hope— a consciousness that 
God has not left them. My prayer is that this 
temple of God may be kept open in the lives of 
the people in this community. This is a great 
day to be building churches — this is a great day 
to be building the Kingdom of God in our hearts. 

"In this high hour," he told them, "when the 
world is burning with hate and greed, this church 
must stand for the spirit of God. The size of the 
church is not important. It is important what the 
people do who go out of it." 

The Rev. Stephen Gardner, rector of St. Peter's 
Church in Washington, read the opening prayers. 
The Rev, Joseph N. Bynum of Roanoke Rapids, 
former Rector of the Sunbury parish, read the 
instrument of Donation and the Rev. Reginald G. 
Eastman, rector of Galilee Church, Eastern Shore 
Chapel, Virginia Beach, also a former rector of 
St. Peter's, read the instrument of Consecration. 

The present rector of St. Peter's Church, the 
Rev. John S. / rmfield, welcomed the bishop, the 
other clergy and the congregation, who, he said, 
showed their interest in the church by being there 
for the dedication. 



The closing prayers were read by the Rev. C. A. 
Ashby, rector of St. Paul's Church in Edenton. 

Bishop Darst also consecrated two memorials: 
a brass cross to William Nixon given by his wife, 
and a brass reading desk to William Nixon given 
by Mr. and Mrs. William Nixon, Jr. 

Editor's Note: — Mr. Nixon was Senior War- 
den of St. Peter's Church for twenty five years. 
He was regular in attendance at the services and 
faithfully performed all the other duties of his 
office. 



EPISCOPAL CHURCH NOW ACTIVE IN 
ONSLOW COUNTY 



For many years we have had to report that 
there was ne Episcopal Church in Onslow County, 
but now we can say that the Episcopal Church 
is actively at work there. The Mission at Tar 
Landing is in Onslow County, and services are 
being held at the County Seat, Jacksonville, by 
the Rev. Charles E. Williams of Christ Church, 
New Bern. 

The Government Camp that will soon be built 
at Holly Ridge will be near our Mission at Tar 
Landing. We understand that about 20,000 men 
will be in this Camp. 



CHURCH AT CHOCOWINITY PAINTED 



Some time ago, the church building at Choco- 
winity was moved into the town and was placed 
near the parish house and rectory, and a few days 
ago the Church was painted. All the buildings are 
now in good condition. The painting of the 
Church was made possible by contributions of the 
Church members and other people of the com- 
munity, who are now interested in our work. 

Trinity, Chocowinity, is one of our colonial 
parishes. The Rector is the Rev. A. C. D. Noe. 



CHURCH OF THE ADVENT, WILLIAMSTON 



The Saint Elizabeth's Auxiliary entertained 
the Woman's Auxiliary of Williamston, and the 
Woman's Auxiliary of Saint Martin's Church 
of Hamilton on November 6th. 

Those present enjoyed delightful and interest- 
ing talks given by Mrs. John Hardy and Mrs. Paul 
Simpson, who attended the Triennial in Kansas 
City. 

A delicious sweet course and spiced tea was 
served by the hostess, Mrs. W. I. Skinner. 
MRS. C. B. CLARK, JR., 

Publicitv Chairman. 




A Christian Christmas 



By Rev. E. F. Moseley, Rector of St. Mary's Parish, Kinston 




There are many people who will celebrate 
Christmas this year as they have always done. 
They will buy for themselves and indulge them- 
selves as though they did not know that the rest 
of the world is in darkness and need. Such ob- 
servance of Christmas is pagan, even though so- 
called Christians are so self-centered as to ob- 
serve this great festival in such manner. 

There are others who have so brooded over the 
tradegy of the world and have so little faith in 
the survival of things that Christmas really 
stands for, that they have an indifferent, if not 
cynical, attitude this year. These also are pagans, 
for they see not beyond the clouds that hang low 
just now. 

But Christians with a conscience will look at 
Christmas seriously this year and seek how they 
may observe it in a Christian manner. How can 
they put the spirit of Christ in Christmas? 

In the first place, Christmas is a joyous sea- 
son. We can't help all the people who are in need 
but we can help some and bring joy into their 
hearts. We can share what we have, or our sel- 



fish joy will turn sour. Not only should we share 
our material things, but equally important we can 
share our cheer and good will. Many people with 
heavy hearts will appreciate genuine friendship 
and kind words more than bread. And bread giv- 
en without love is sacrilege, whereas with love it 
is a sacrament. 

Then too, Christmas we associate with peace, 
and war seems more horrible at this season. But 
because the world is mad either with fighting or 
preparing for war, should we abandon the idea 
of peace until the war is over? That would leave 
the world in the hands of the war-makers. Christ- 
ian people should not lose faith in the fact that 
it is only Christianity that is going to break down 
the war spirit. And if Christians give up hope of 
peace we have deserted our Saviour, the Prince of 
Peace. Of course, we know that we shall not 
have peace merely by not fighting. We must get 
rid of the hates and prejudices in our hearts 
for these are the basis of war. Until the love of 
our fellow-man grips us, and until we have an 
attitude of '"good will" toward all men, the world 
will always be threatened by war. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMINGTON 



The Good Shepherd Parish held a most suc- 
cessful Harvest Thanksgiving Bazaar on Novem- 
ber 22nd, in the Parish House, from 2:00 P. M. 
tiJl 10:00 P. M. 

It was a great success both financially and 
from a standpoint of getting the people of the 
Parish together in one united effort. All of the 
organizations had a share in the promotion of 
the event. 

Ninety-five dollars was realized, and will be 
used in repairing the rooms in the rear of the 
Parish Hall. One of the rooms is used as an 
assembly room for the various organizations, and 
the other for the Primary Department of the 
Church School. 

The Hall was very attractively decorated in 
carnival style with colored balloons hanging from 



the lights. 

On either side of the Hall were attractive 
booths, decorated in different color schemes. One 
booth made in the form of a cradle, held many 
lovely articles for the baby. 

The Religious Booth sold miniature crosses for 
Prayer Corners, religious pictures and literature. 

The Art, Handicraft and Produce Booths car- 
ried articles for the housewife. The Home-made 
candy table and Hot dog stand did a landslide 
business. 

The stage was most artistically fixed as a Tea 
Room, where English Tea was served from four 
to six. 

The children were very enthusiastic over the 
games of which they had charge — Ring-throwing 
and puncturing balloons with darts. 

It was decided to make the Bazaar an annual 
event, as it was enjoyed so much by all who took 
part. 



DECEMBER, 1940 



FORMAL OPENING OF STONE HALL, 

CALABASH MISSION, BRUNSWICK 

COUNTY 



By Elizabeth MacMurray 

November twenty-fifth will linger long in the 
minds of the staff of the Inland Waterway Mis- 
sions as a memorable day. Memorable because 
so many of you, our friends and Church people 
shared the warmth and fellowship of our hearth ; 
memorable because the vision we had of such a 
place is now a reality and we could ask God's 
blessing upon it; memorable because the delight- 
ful occasion ended with Bishop's Darst's confirm- 
ing six persons — the first class to be presented 
in Calabash. 

Words fail when those so closely connected 
with the work attempt to tell you what the open- 
ing of Stone Hall meant to us. We trust that 
to those who shared it with us that day, may 
have come a real prayer that Calabash and Bruns- 
wick County may be blessed through its ministry. 
Those of you who could not come on November 
twenty-fifth, come another time and spend as 
long as you can at Stone Hall. We love it and we 
believe >ou will too. 

Perhaps you would like to hear how the com- 
munity ieels toward Stone Hall. One woman in 
the community, misunderstanding a remark I 
made, said "What's that you said about leaving? 
If I had as pretty a house as that to live in, I'd 
stay there until the Lord came after me !'" 

More than two hundred books are in our library 
at present, and daily people drop in to exchange 
books and sit down to browse through them or 
look at the daily paper. Thanksgiving Day was 
a holiday and some fifteen or so children spent 
the day with us. We had five guests for dinner, 
the occasion being also the birthday of two of 
our young people, one nine and the other sixteen. 
Seven of us ate and as many more looked on. 
Then the day ended with a much anticipated 
weiner roast for the children. The living room 
of the parish house was the scene of the gay 
Christmas meeting of the Woman's Club with 
eighteen present. If you could all have seen 
those women revelling in tie hospitality of Stone 
Hall you would know it was worth while. Stone 
Hall is the meeting place of the Men's Bible Class, 
the Junior League, the Senior League, and our 
mid-week Bible Class is held there. The living 
room floor is often dotted about with groups of 
children playing Chinese Checkers. It is not 
difficult to know how the children feel about 
Stone Hall. Approval of everything is seen in 
their happy faces. They love the picture of Mr. 
Marshall that hrmgs in the !iv;ng-room. 



Another reason for our thankfulness of No- 
vember iwenty-fifth was on account of the liberal 
offering of sixty dollars and fifty cents that 
helped to make it possible for us to feel safe in 
purchasing our much needed automobile. All 
of you rejoice with us in the car that we have. 
May it be used in causing many to know our Lord 
and Saviour Jesus Christ. 



REV. 



ROBERT C. FLETCHER APPOINTED 
TRUSTEE 




The Rev. Robert C. Fletcher, Episcopal Mis- 
sionary to the Deaf in the Province of Sewanee 
since 1929, was recently appointed one of the 
three trustees of the National Association of the 
Deaf. 

This organization seeks to promote scientific 
efforts to prevent deafness, and better education, 
employment and social conditions among per- 
sons whose hearing is impaired. 

The Episcopal Church has eleven missionaries 
who are carrying on the religious work which 
it started ninety years ago in New York and 
Philadelphia. At various times the National 
Association for the Deaf has depended on our 
experienced missionaries for help and leadership. 

Mr. F'etcher has several missions in our dio- 
cese which he visits throughout the year. 



HOLY INNOCENTS', SEVEN SPRINGS 



The Woman's Auxiliary met November 16th. 
Our Educational Chairman, Mrs. J. G. Whitfield, 
gave a quiz on the first four chapters of Acts. 

We are sponsoring a Festival and Bazaar, the 
proceeds to go to help carry on the work of the 
Auxiliarv. 

MRS KLEBER CROOM, 

Publicity Chairman 



IJoung People's Senri.ee League 

By Mary D. Home, Publicity Chairman 
A LETTER FOR YA' CONVOCATIONAL MEETING 



Dear Leaguers: 

It was grand seeing all of you people at the 
meeting in Kinston, November 23rd. And weren't 

those Kinston Leaguers swell hosts? Thanks 

to the Moseleys and Johnny Osteen and his 
league for a splendid time. It was just like con- 
vention except there was no Camp Leach. But 
the good ole Camp Spirit, that we work so hard 
for, was all over the place and everybody de- 
serves a blue ribbon. However, there were a few 
people who just couldn't get to Kinston for the 
meeting and to those we say "We missed you". 

Well Christmas is just about here and may it 
be a joyous one. But though Christmas brings 
happiness to so many, it brings sad thoughts 
also. For we think of all the people across the 
sea, who instead of listening to beautiful Christ- 
mas music, listen to the deafening, never ceasing 
roar of the cannon and. are constantly alert for 
the sound of the air raid alarm. The families 
must be divided, the father in the trenches, the 
mother and children huddled in an air raid shelter, 
wnile we sit safe at home with everyone home for 
Christmas. And in some countries, they can't 
e ,T en go to the ever beautiful midnight Mass and 
worship. They can't give thanks for the Birth of 
our Lord and Saviour. They pay homage to a 
man made God. 

There's not much we can do for these people, 
you say. Perhaps not materially. But we can 
offer our prayers to the Lord of Lords, and King 
of kings and perhaps through this medium He 
will bring them "The Peace of God which pass- 
eth all understanding" and guide them back to a 
normal way of life. 

So let us, as a united young people, say this 
prayer as we kneel at the Altar for the Christ- 
mas Service. 

"O Christ, who by a Cross of love didst turn 
the counsels of sin and hate into the healing of 
the world, proclaim, we beseech thee, to the peo- 
ples of the nations the things which belong to 
their true peace; that they may rise with a sin- 
gle voice to forgive past wrong, to repent pre- 
sent bitterness, and to remember only their unity 
in Thee and Thy kingdom of love, who livest with 
the Father, and the Holy Spirit, One God, world 
without end. Amen. 



Plans for uniting the Christian Youth of the 
Nation were presented to the members of the 
Young People's Service League at the fall Con- 
vocational meeting held in St. Mary's Episcopal 
Church, Kinston on November 24, by Walter Noe, 
Jr., one of the speakers reporting on the events 
of the National Youth Week-end of the Kansas 
City Convention. 

The proposal involved seven points: Worship, 
Study, Action, Individual Commitment, Leader- 
ship, Literature, and Organization. 

Each of the points were discussed and ex- 
plained in detail. And in conclusion a reso- 
lution was presented and adopted "that the 
Young People's Service League of the Diocese of 
East Carolina write a letter to the Rev. Frederick 
H. Arterton, National Youth Secretary, endors- 
ing this proposal". 

Other talks were made by Hallie Townes, Wil- 
mington, and Rev. John Grainger, Goldsboro, on 
Fellowship and Programs respectively. 

The meeting was followed by a Fellowship 
Banquet in the parish house. 

Belle Ray Tillinghast, first vice president from 
St. John s, Fayetteville, presided over the meeting 
attended by 250 young people, clergy and coun- 
sellors. 



CHRIST CHURCH, ELIZABETH CITY 



Our League thought the new Y. P. S. L. Hand- 
book was the most complete and helpful ever 
produced. We are now passing it among our 
members so that every one might have a chance 
to read it. We congratulate you on such a help- 
ful book. 

This year our officers of the League were in- 
stalled at the Church service on November 3rd, 
by the Rector. We think this is a very impres- 
sive service and are enclosing a copy so if you 
are interested perhaps you can use it. During the 
same service we had a corporate communion. 
Our new officers are as follows : President — Betty 
Gaither; Vi:e President — Lucile Williams; Secre- 
tary Betty Griffin: Treasurer — Bill Dawson; 

Publicity Chairman — Carolyn Hill ; Diocesan Rep- 
resentative — Morgia Worth Garrett; Thank Of- 
fering Secretary — Virginia Wilson; Pianists — 
Audrey Dawson and Lucile Williams. 

We are very sorry no one in our League was 
able to get to Kinston for the Convocational 
meeting. We were hoping it might be in our own 



DECEMBER, 1940 



11 



Convocation and nearer to us but it was so far 
away we could not get there. Most of our mem- 
bers are too young to drive and it is hard to get 
others to take us. Perhaps we will be able to 
make it next year. 

We arc very proud to report that all our Pro- 
vincial and Diocesan dues are paid in full and 
that many genuine acts of service have been 
reported. 

CAROLYN HILL 



INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS OF THE 
Y. P. S. L. FOR 1940-1941 



Hymn (as announced). Immediately after the 
sermon, at the beginning of the first verse, of- 
ficers will go to the Altar Rail, taking this paper 
with them. 

Rector: You who are now gathered before the 
Altar of this Church, have been duly elected of- 
ficers of the Young People's Service League of 
this parish by your fellow members. The officers 
are as follows : President, Vice-President, Treas- 
urer, Secretary, Diocesan Representative, Thank 
Offering Secretary, and Publicity Chairman. 

Your election to these offices are far from emp- 
ty honors. Special authority and powers have 
been granted you by your election, in order that 
you might exercise the same in the furtherance 
of your four ideals, namely: Worship, Service, 
Fellowship and Study. The success of these 
ideals for the year 1940-41 will depend largely 
upon your loyalty, consecration and determina- 
tion as officers. May God grant you strength, 
courage and faith to do all that is expected of you 
by your membership and by your Heavenly Fa- 
ther. 

In accepting your office as elected, you have 
the prayers of this congregation, that through 
each of you God's Holy Will may be done and His 
Kingdom may be brought nearer. 

WHAT PLEDGE DO EACH OF YOU MAKE 
TO GOD, TO YOUR LEAGUE AND TO EACH 
OTHER ? 

Officers: I pledge allegiance to the Young 
People's Service League of the Diocese of East 
Carolina and to this parish, and to consecrate 
myself during this year to greater usefulness in 
the League through the ideals for which it 
stands: Worship, Service, Fellowship and Study. 

Rector: The Lord be with you. 

All: And with thy spirit. 

Rector: Let us pray. (All kneeling and 
saying together this prayer: O Lord, we pray 
that Thou wilt bless us as members of the Young 
People's Service League. Give us wisdom and 
strength to carry out effective plans for the 



spread of the ideals of the League. Draw us ever 
closer to Thyself, and grant that by our member- 
ship we may be made better members of Thy 
Kingdom, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen. 
Rector : (Prayers and benediction.) 
(The officers will retire to their pews when the 
hymn is being sung.) 



HOLY INNOCENTS', SEVEN SPRINGS 



The Young People's Service League of Holy 
Innocents', Seven Springs have recently elected 
new officers for the coming year. They are as 
follows : President, Edward Davis ; Vice Pres- 
ident, Liilie Raye Smith ; Secretary, Nettie Har- 
dy; Treasurer, Howard Hardy; and Publicity 
Chairman, Nettie Hardy. 

Thanksgiving morning our League visited the 
Lenoir County Home. We presented a short 
Thanksgiving program and served fruits and nuts 
to the inmates. 

MARTHA RAYE BARWICK 



ST. STEPHENS, GOLDSBORO 



As the New Church Year begins, it is good to 
feel that our St. Stephen's Branch of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary has had a year of accomplsh- 
ments and advancements. We have had interest- 
ing monthly programs, the most outstanding one, 
our recent talk by Mrs. MacMillan, just back from 
the Triennial, and so full of enthusiasm and in- 
spiration. We have two new organizations in 
our Parish : a parish Council and a New Guild of 
young girls. The guild will be called St. Cath- 
erine's, and as part of the members work, they 
will have their meetings at night. Thanksgiving 
morning, St. Anne's Guild served a Parish Break- 
fast after the early service. For this Breakfast 
our Parish House Annex was used for the first 
time. This building is the old Rectory that has 
just been refinished under the direction of Mrs. 
Kennon Borden, and furnishes much needed space 
for Sunday School classes and social gatherings. 
We plan a House-warming there after the Decem- 
ber meeting, and hope for many suitable re- 
membrances ! Our members are continuing the 
splendid Red Cross Work they began last Spring, 
both in the Sewing Room, and by knitting or sew- 
ing at home. 

During the early fall two memorial windows 
were placed in the Tower Entrance to St. Ste- 
phen's Church, in Memory of our late Rector, 
Rev. George S. Gresham, by members of his fam- 
ily. The dedication service will be held in the 
Spring. 

MPS. JAMES L. BELOTE, 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



FR(M A VERY INTERESTING REPORT OF 

THE VESTRY OF GRACE CHURCH 

PLYMOUTH 



Church Properties 

Since the beginning of the year 1940 the parish 
has laid great stress upon the problem of repair- 
ing, improving and beautifying the properties 
owned by the Church. This task has been a diffi- 
cult one. but a remarkable degree of progress has 
been made. The following list of accomplishments 
-summarizes the progress achieved in regard to 
the Church and its property: 

1. Furnace room cleaned and placed in satis- 
factory condition. 

2. Furnace repaired and flushed out at a cost 
of approximately $70.00. New grates and other 
necessary additions were made. 

3. All broken windows in the Church were re- 
placed and all windows reputtied and painted. All 
rotten box boards, of which there were consider- 
able, were replaced. The entrances to the furnace 
room were repaired and a new roof put on and all 
painted. 

4. All vines were cut and trimmed away from 
the box boards, and also from around the win- 
dows. This was done to prevent the vines from 
getting under the shingles and boards and to 
prevent their destruction. 

5. All accumulated grass and other debris 
was removed from the Church yard and the yard 
kept in proper shape to date. All unnecessary 
bushes were removed and trimmed and other or- 
namental bushes, such as rose bushes, were added. 

6. All of the iron fences around certain pri- 
vate lots have been painted with the exception of 
one which we expect to finish in a short time. All 
tombstones were straightened up and repaired 
where necessary. A great many sunken graves 
and low places in the Church yard were filled and 
this work will be completed in a short time. A bor- 
der of Iris has been planted around half of the 
church yard and this work will be completed. The 
old, broken down fence around the church yard 
was removed, as it was practically impossible to 
repair same. 

7. The rectory was in a run down condition 
and the necessary repairs were made to make it 
tenantable. The rectory to date is in good con- 
dition. 

8. The pipe organ that had not been cleaned 
in ten years was badly in need of cleaning and 
repair. This work was contracted out to a reliable 



organ company, and an electric keyboard was 
added and several new stops put in. This repair 
work was done at a cost of $500.00, $100.00 of 
which has been raised by subscription; the sum 
of $250.00 has been paid to date on this work and 
the balance is due next year. 

9. A gasoline powered lawn mower has been 
purchased. One-half the cost was taken from the 
yard fund. The yard has been kept in this ex- 
cellent condition by public donations of time or 
money by the members of the Church. 

10. A complete survey of the Church property 
has been made. On this survey the proper loca- 
tion with the names of all lots in the church yard 
have been designated. The church has also been 
properly located on this survey. Permanent con- 
crete markers have been placed on each corner 
of each lot so that in the future any of these lots 
may be definitely located. 

11. Plans have been drawn and inquiries made 
in regard to securing memorial windows at the 
front of the church in memory of Dr. Ward, his 
wife and his daughter. 

12. Considerable work was carried on in the 
belfry of the church so that the bell could be rung. 

13. All outstanding unpaid portions for burial 
lots were immediately acted upon by the Vestry 
early in the year and all records brought com- 
pletely up to date. All lots have been paid for 
and deeds collected with the exception of three, 
two of these are under a plan to be paid for at the 
present time. 

The following list of projects is under discus- 
sion and it is hoped that these will be approved 
and completed at an early date: 

1. The purchase of new doors for three en- 
trances. The doors there at the present are in a 
deplorable condition. 

2. The purchase of memorial windows for Dr. 
Ward as above described. 

3. The painting of all box boards around the 
church, and the crosses on the church. 

4. The sandpapering and repainting of all 
church pews. 

5. The purchase of either a new rug for the 
church, or putting hardwood floors in the church. 

6. Working on plans for a new lighting sys- 
tem. 

7. Changing the position of the present organ 
so that it will greatly improve the sound effect 
of both the organ and choir. 



DECEMBER, 1940 



13 



OUR PRESENT DUTY 



By Rl. Rev. Henry St. George Tucker, 
Presiding Bishop 



A time like the present imposes a severe strain 
upon our loyalty to and our belief in the good. 
There is the temptation to repay evil with evil, 
to allow the hatred and anger from which we 
are suffering to provoke in us an answering anger 
ai:>d haired. Among the many responsibilities 
which Christians must assume in time of war, 
none is more important than to keep alive the 
spirit of love toward those whose evil we oppose. 

We see around us a world in which good activ- 
ities are in imminent danger of being overcome by 
those that are evil. An heroic effort is being 
made to save mankind from what in our estima- 
tion at least would be a terrible disaster. Ameri- 
can Christians represent the only considerable 
body of Christ's followers whose energies are 
not absorbed in this titanic struggle. We are 
not uninterested spectators. We feel that the 
welfare of the world will be gravely affected by 
the outcome of the present struggle; our own 
as well as that of nations directly involved. We 
are consequently busy preparing to defend our- 
selves against future attacks by possible aggres- 
sors. We are giving moral support and as much 
material aid as seems practicable, if we are to 
preserve our neutral position, to those nations 
which are fighting for principles whose main- 
tenance we consider necessary for human wel- 
fare. 

Let us not delude ourselves with the hope that 
our national preparation to safeguard us from the 
dangers of war releases us as members of the 
Church from any further concern. All that it 
does is give us another opportunity to apply our- 
selves with more diligence and more sacrifice to 
the task to which God calls us, that of overcoming 
evil with good during the years of peace to which 
we look forward. 

The first requisite of the preparation we should 
make in this time of war is more real dedication 
of ourselves to God. The second requisite is more 
readiness to use the capacities which have been 
enriched by the love of God shed abroad in our 
hearts in actual service. 

The next requisite for going forward in service 
is an ardent longing to extend to all men the op- 
portunity to receive that power which has trans- 
formed our own lives into witnesses unto Christ. 

Shall we not place upon the altar the bodies 



that have been made clean by His Body and the 
souls that have been washed through His most 
precious Blood, offering them and all the re- 
sources that God has entrusted to us as a holy, 
living and reasonable sacrifice? 

If so, we may well have confidence that God 
will use our little sacrifice to complete that work 
of saving the world that was begun by the sac- 
rifice of the Son of God upon the Cross of Calvary. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF PRESIDENT OF THE 

MEN'S CLUB OF ST. JOHN'S PARISH, 

WILMINGTON 



To the Members of the Men's Club of St. John's 
Parish : 

T beg to submit my report as to the activities 
of the club for its second year. 

I first desire to convey to each of you present 
my sincere appreciation of the loyal support that 
1 have had and also of the wonderful response 
from the ladies of the Church, and any success 
that the Club may have had during the past year 
is solely attributable to the vast amount of effort 
put forth by both the ladies and the men of the 
Parish. 

I wish to also thank the other officers, the 
members of the Executive Committee and all of 
the members of the various standing and working 
committees for their much needed help. 

While our various committees have not func- 
tioned 100 per cent, there has been improvement 
during the past year, and I ask that each of you 
during the coming year, whenever you are as- 
signed to any committee, make an honest effort 
to perform the duty assigned to you and by so 
doing you will lighten the work of the other mem- 
bers of the committee, and at the same time find 
that the work is not burdensome on any one per- 
son when each one does his equal share, and you 
will also have the pleasure of participating in 
carrying on a good work. If for any reason 
you find that you can not accept work on any 
committee to which you are assigned, just let 
the President of the Club know, so that someone 
else can be assigned in your place. 

The principal purposes of our Club are to enlist 
laymen in active service for the Church; to pro- 
mote fellowship among men; and to cooperate 
with the Rector and Vestry of our Parish. We 
have most assuredly made much gain this year 
towards attaining our goal and, with the con- 
tinued and increased interest and work of the 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



men of the Parish, I feel sure of ultimate success 
in our undertakings. 

During the past year, prior to tonight, we have 
held nine (,9) meetings with an average atten- 
dance of over 42. There are only 18 resident 
communicants of St. John's Parish that have not 
attended at least one meeting since the club was 
organized. 

We have been fortunate in securing outstand- 
ing people as our guest speakers, who have 
brought messages which were both inspiring and 
interesting, and during the year we have heard 
Rev. Mortimer Glover, Judge Alan A. Marshall, 
Rev. Carl Fisher, Mrs. W. 0. S. Sutherland, Rev. 
Walter Freed, Rev. J. F. Herbert, Judge John J. 
Burney, Dr. Charlton H. Storey, Mr. W. H. Hen- 
derson and tonight Rev. Jack R. Rountree. 

During the year Bishop Darst attended and 
participated in three (3) of our meetings. 

On the way to our December 1939 meeting our 
oldest member, Mr. W. H. Yopp was stricken down 
bv an automobile and from the effects of this ac- 
cident in September 1940, passed away, after 
having lived an active Christian life of over 90 
years. Mr. Yopp will surely be missed by all. 

The metal sign which we worked so hard for 
last year was installed and fittingly dedicated by 
Bishop Darst at our December 1939 meeting. 

At this same meeting we took up a special 
Christmas collection of $12.05, which was used to 
purchase one-half ton of coal for a member of 
the Parish in need and the remainder was spent 
on baskets for the needy which were distributed 
by Mr. and Mrs. Halleck. 

We also called upon the Mayor of the City to 
help in curbing the shooting of fireworks in the 
vicinity of St. John's and also called attention 
to the same situation at St. James' and St. Paul's, 
during the Christmas services, and, though our 
request was not acknowledged, the Chief of Po- 
lice did place a policeman on special duty, which 
materially helped. 

At the January 1940 meeting, a special offering 
was taken to aid the ladies in the purchase of the 
carpet for the church and $18.00 was realized, also 
during the summer months our members contri- 
buted over $30.00 towards this good cause. 

At our June 1940 meeting, a resolution was 
adopted and sent to the President of the United 
States, with copies to the Senators and Represent- 
atives from North Carolina in Congress, endors- 
irg compulsory military service for boys upon 
completion of High School. The President refer- 
red this resolution to the War Department for 
handling and we also received acknowledgements 
from our Senators and some of the Representa- 
tives. 



I wish to thank Mr. Darden for the wonderful 
work he is doing in conducting and teaching the 
Men's Bible Class, which means much to our Club 
and the parish, and while the attendance is good 
there is no reason why we cannot have at least 
fifty men present on every Sunday morning for 
this thirty minute period, so I want to again ask 
each of you to attend these classes and take ad- 
vantage of this wonderful opportunity to learn 
more about the Bible. 

During the year we had requests for informa- 
tion as to the operation of our Club from Holy 
Trinity Church, at Hertford, N. C, and Christ 
Church at Elizabeth City, N. C, and complete in- 
formation, along with copies of our Constitution 
and By-Laws, was sent in each instance and I 
hope we will be of help in there being active 
Men's Clubs in both of these Parishes. 

With best wishes for the success of the Club 
and for each of you during the coming year and 
in each succeeding year, and again making a 
plea to each and all of you to take up the chal- 
lenge of the "Dictators", by taking an ever active 
interest in the Men's Club of St. John's Parish, 
and show to the world that Christianity and free- 
dom can and does exist on this earth, I am, 
Faithfully yours, 

NATHAN S. HASKETT, 

President 



THE GENERAL CHURCH IS BECOMING 

INTERESTED IN OUR INLAND 

WATERWAY WORK 



According to reports that have come to us from 
other parts of the Church and from our head- 
quarters in New York many people are becoming 
interested in our Inland Waterway Work. 

We have had requests from two of our national 
periodicals for information and pictures. 

The Speaker's Bureau of the National Council 
has asked one of our women workers, Miss Eliz- 
abeth MacMurray of the Calabash Mission, in 
Brunswick County, to present this work to a 
number of parishes in the Diocese of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

There are at present two missions along the 
Inland Waterway, one at Calabash served by 
Miss MacMurray, and the other at Tar Landing 
served by Miss Jettie Odell. The Rev. J. Leon 
Malone is minister-in-charge of this work. 

There are many other places waiting for us, 
and with the help of the General Church, we hope 
some day to do the same for them that we have 
been able to do at Calabash and Tar Landing. 



DECEMBER, 1940 



15 



AMERICA'S PRAYER FOR PEACE 



(Sing to tune of "America") 

Eternal God, to Thee, 
We come in unity, 
Praying for peace : 
May every voice that rings, 
May every soul that sings, 
May every heart that speaks 
Cry out for peace. 

May all the strife that wrings 

The hearts of men and kings, 

God, be stilled ! 

May peace, good will to men, 

All human carnage end; 

May every nation bow 

To Thy good will. 



If we must fight, Lord, 

For life and liberty, 

God lead us still ! 

And may the battle win 

For peace eternally, 

And warring nations come 

To know Thy will. 

To Thee, God, for truth, 
For peace and liberty, 
We pray and sing: 
May all the world be bright 
With freedom's holy light, 
Command it by Thy might, 
Great God, our King! 



By Isaac Theophilus Smith 
Windsor, N. C. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND 
GENERAL CHURCH WORK, JANU ARY L 1340 TO DECEMBER 31. 1940 

CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



Paid to 
Dec. 12th 
1940 
Parishes 

Beaufort. St. Paul's $ 165.00 

Clinton. St. Paul's 150.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 1,613.28 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 841.20 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 100.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 850.00 

Lumberton, Trinitv 60.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 1,676.34 

Red Springs. St. Stephen's 84.50 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 80.80 

Southport, St. Philip's 175.00 

Vanceboro, St. Paul = ..- 40.00 

Whiteville, G-ace Church 45.07 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 244.71 

Wilmington, St. James' 8,462.29. 

Wilmington, St. John's 2,021.13 

Wilmington, St. Pail's 700.00 



Organized M'ssions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Campbellton. St. Philip-Apostle 

Fa ; son. St. Gabriel's 

North West. All Soul's 

Pikev ; lle, St. George's 

Trenton. Grace Church 

Wilmington, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 



Unorganized Missions 

Calabash. St. Andrew's 

Polloksville, Mission 

Tar Landing. Mission 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd ... 



Paid to 
>ec. 12th 
1940 

17.60 

40.00 

30.00 

5.00 

25.00 
22.50 
25.0l> 



15.60 
5.00 
6.71 

75.00 



Total $17,576.73 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



Parishes 

Aurora. Holv Cross 27.31 

Ayden. St. James' 50.00 

Bath, St. Thomas' : 13.63 

Belhaven, St. James' 100.00 

Bonnerton, St. John's 33.14 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Columbia, fit. Andrew's 36.25 

Creswell, St. David's ...: 25.02 

Edenton. St. Paul's 900.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 940.88 

Farm v> He, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 37.81 

Greenville, St. Paul's 849.04 

Grifton, St. John's 100.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 20.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 300.00 

Jessama, Zion 116.72 

Lake Landing, St. George's 15 4F 

Plymouth, Grace Church 200.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 38.15 

Washington, St. Peter's 1,977.17 

Wil'iamston, Advent 150.50 



Windsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield. All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Winterville, S.. Luke's 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's ... 



Unorganized Missions 

A /oca, Holy Innocents' 



Parochial Missions 

Creswell, Galilee Mission .... 



250.00 

17.79 

200.00 



32.98 



54.45 
31.00 



20.00 

io. no 

150.00 
40.00 



29.50 



10.00 



Total $ 6,776.79 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cypxian's. 
Wilmington St Mark's .... 



Organized Missions 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 

Edenton, St. John the Evangelist 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 

GoiasDoro, St. Andrew's 

Kir.^ton, St. Augustine's 

Washington St. Paul's 



13.83 
335.74 
115.00 

42.02 
125.00 
16.03 
35.00 
50.00 
43.22 



Unorganized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Farmville, St. Timothy's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock'* v -Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, Brooklyn Mission 



15.72 
35.25 

5.0»» 
21.00 
25.00 
12.90 



Total $ 890.71 

Grand Total $25,244.23 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 






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VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 

RECTOR 



| THEY ARE ON SALE IN YOUR PARISH 

LARGE. ATTRACTIVE BOOKLETS 
J Printed For the 

SILVER JUBILEE OF BISHOP DARST 

Entitled 

"BISHOP DARST AND EAST CAROLINA 

DURING THE PAST TWENTY-FTVE YEARS' 

Price 35 cents 



THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of East Carolna 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.09 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 
Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
I Wilmington, N. C. 

I _ 



INVESTMENTS ! 



We are at all times ready to assist the in- 
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sale of any type security. 

We specialize in : 

NO^-TH CAROLINA 

STfeTE, COUNTY AND CTTY TOND3 

Local Preferred and Common Stocks 

Please communicate with lis if we can be of 
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Oscar Burnett and Company I 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Thomas C. Darst, Jr. Lloyd E. Canady 

I __ 



I ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

j RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

! Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 

j copal Church. 

I A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 

degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



i 



! I 

I i 
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! 1 
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*■ 

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THE MISSION HERALD 

The Official Church Paper of the Diocese 
of Easi Carolina 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 A YEAR 
Payable In Advance 

Address: THE MISSION HERALD 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Editor and Business Manager 
Wilmington, N. C. 

McCONNELL & CAUSEY | 

FOR SERVICE 
Good -Year Tires Exide Batteries \ 

Quaker State Lubrication \ 



Telephone 88 



12th & Market Sts. j 



Wilmington, N. C. 



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LOUIE E. WOODBURY, Jr. 

INSURANCE 

815 Murchison Building 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Phone 84 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for Girls — Have your daughter 
cotitinue her education in a Church school. 

MRS. ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, A. M. 
President 

Saint Mary's offers the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades 
of High S"hool and 2 years College work. All acade- 
mic courses fully accredited by Southern Association. 

General charge $700 including tu lion In Art, Expres 

sion, Home Economics, Music. 

Gym and Field sports, Horseback Riding, Golf, 
Tennis, 20 acre campus and Indoor Tiled Pool. 

Catalogue and Book of Views 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



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